Current Copepods News and Events

Current Copepods News and Events, Copepods News Articles.
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Changing environment at home genetically primes invasive species to take over abroad
University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists have found that a constantly fluctuating environment can enable some species to invade new areas by helping them maintain the genetic diversity they need to settle into their new homes. (2020-06-22)

Climate change has degraded productivity of shelf sea food webs
Released to coincide with World Oceans Day, new research led by the University of Plymouth has shown that a shortage of summer nutrients -- a result of our changing climate -- has contributed to a 50% decline in important North East Atlantic plankton over the past 60 years. (2020-06-07)

The North Atlantic right whale population is in poor condition
New research reveals that endangered North Atlantic right whales are in poorer body condition than individual whales from the three well recovering populations of Southern right whales. This difference is alarming: poor body condition for North Atlantic right whales explains why too many of them are dying, and why they are not giving birth to enough calves to boost the population's recovery. The results has been published in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series. (2020-04-27)

Ecological impacts of palm stearin spill to the coastal ecosystem
In August 2017, a marine accident occurred in the Pearl River Estuary where a cargo vessel accidentally released about 1,000 tonnes of palm stearin into the sea, where over 200 tonnes reached the southwest coasts of Hong Kong. Subsequently an HKU research team launched an 18-month investigation on the degradation, bioaccumulation, and toxicity of the palm stearin through bother field- and laboratory-based investigations. The results were published in the international journal Environmental Science & Technology. (2019-12-20)

Siberian blue lakes and their inhabitants
There are picturesque but poorly studied blue lakes situated in Western Siberia. They are named so because of their color. To understand how such ecosystems function, scientists from Tyumen analyzed the chemical composition of water and studied the invertebrates' species living in them. These lakes are good model objects for studying the laws of geological history and the formation of the earth's surface, features of the natural and technogenic geo-and hydrochemical background of the region. (2019-12-05)

Climate change is reshaping communities of ocean organisms
Climate change is reshaping communities of fish and other sea life, according to a pioneering study on how ocean warming is affecting the mix of species. The study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, covers species that are important for fisheries and that serve as food for fish, such as copepods and other zooplankton. (2019-11-25)

For this ocean dweller, ability to respond to warming waters is about location
A new study by UConn researchers seeks to tease out some of the myriad pressures that drive adaptation in small, widely dispersed marine animals called copepods. (2019-09-27)

Dinoflagellate plankton glow so that their predators won't eat them
Some dinoflagellate plankton species are bioluminescent, with a remarkable ability to produce light to make themselves and the water they swim in glow. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on June 17 have found that for one dinoflagellate species (Lingulodinium polyedra), this bioluminescence is also a defense mechanism that helps them ward off the copepod grazers that would like to eat them. (2019-06-17)

Low oxygen levels could temporarily blind marine invertebrates
Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego have found that low oxygen levels in seawater could blind some marine invertebrates. (2019-05-08)

Small animals with big impact
Copepods, the world's most common animal, release unique substances into the oceans. Concentrations of these substances are high enough to affect the marine food web, according to new research from the University of Gothenburg. The studies also show that phytoplankton in the oceans detect the special scent of copepods and do their utmost to avoid being eaten. (2019-03-08)

Penguins, starfish, whales: Which animals will win and lose in a warming Antarctic?
Using risk assessments, like those used for setting occupational safety limits in the workplace, researchers determined the winners and losers of climate change in the Antarctic. They show that marine animals associated with sea ice for food or breeding, such as some whales and penguins, are most at risk from the effects of climate change, while seafloor predators and open-water feeding animals like starfish and jellyfish will benefit from the opening up of new habitat. (2019-01-17)

Aquatic animals that jump out of water inspire leaping robots
Ever watch aquatic animals jump out of the water and wonder how they manage to do it in such a streamlined and graceful way? Researchers who specialize in water entry and exit in nature had the same question. During the APS DFD 71st Annual Meeting, Nov. 18-20, they will present their work designing a robotic system inspired by jumping copepods and frogs to illuminate some of the fluid dynamics at play when aquatic animals jump. (2018-11-20)

Marine algae bloom-derived biotoxins alter development of zooplankton and ocean food web
UB warns on climate change-related microalgal blooms affecting marine ecosystems (2018-10-24)

New study helps explain recent scarcity of Bay nettles
A new, long-term study of how environmental conditions affect the abundance and distribution of jellyfish in the nation's largest estuary helps explain the widely reported scarcity of sea nettles within Chesapeake Bay during the past few months and raises concerns about how a long-term continuation of this trend might harm Bay fisheries as climate continues to warm. (2018-10-10)

Japanese student discovers new crustacean species in deep sea hydrothermal vent
A new species of microcrustacean was collected from a submarine hot spring (hydrothermal vent) of a marine volcano (Myojin-sho caldera) in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Japan. This crustacean group is found only in deep-sea hydrothermal vents and is the first of its kind found in Japanese waters. (2018-05-20)

Can we imitate organisms' abilities to decode water patterns for new technologies?
The shape of water. Can it tell us about what drives romance? Among fish, it might. Eva Kanso, a professor of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering studies fluid flows and almost like a forensic expert, Kanso, along with her team, is studying how aquatic signals are transported through the water. (2018-04-05)

Tiny red animals dart in the dark under the ice of a frozen Quebec lake
In a frozen lake in Quebec, tiny red creatures zip about under the ice. Guillaume Grosbois and Milla Rautio, researchers at Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, Saguenay, Québec, Canada report the discovery of active, unusually red, life in a winter lake today in the Ecological Sociey of America's journal Ecology. Bright pigment may preserve zooplankton's fatty acids from oxidative damage. (2017-12-19)

Climate change, sparse policies endanger right whale population
North Atlantic right whales -- a highly endangered species making modest population gains in the past decade - may be imperiled by warming waters and insufficient international protection, according to a new Cornell University analysis published in Global Change Biology. (2017-11-07)

Tracking down the whale-shark highway
MBARI biological oceanographer John Ryan and his colleagues recently discovered that whale sharks in the Eastern Tropical Pacific follow fronts -- the dynamic boundaries between warm and cold ocean waters. (2017-08-30)

Time to rise and shine
The copepod species Calanus finmarchicus schedules its day using a genetic clock that works independently of external stimuli. The clock shapes the copepod's metabolic rhythms and daily vertical migration. This in turn have an enormous influence on the entire food web in the North Atlantic, where Calanus finmarchicus is a central plankton species. Wherever the high-calorie copepod is, determines where its predator species are. The results of the study will be published in the journal Current Biology. (2017-07-13)

Meals on the go: The physics of whales' eating habits
Saint Louis University professor of physics Jean Potvin, Ph.D., and colleagues detail for the first time how baleen whales use crossflow filtration to separate prey from water without ever coming into contact with the baleen. (2017-06-06)

Melting sea ice may lead to more life in the sea
Every year an increasing amount of sea ice is melting in the Arctic. This can start a chain reaction, which leads to increased production of algae and hence more food for creatures in the sea. (2017-03-30)

New species of Brazilian copepod suggests ancient species diversification and distribution
A new species and genus of a tiny freshwater copepod has been found in the Brazilian rocky savannas, an ecosystem under heavy anthropogenic pressure. Prior to the discovery, only one genus of its subfamily had been recorded in the Neotropical region, which comes to show that related species had already spread across a huge range when the ancient supercontinent Gondwana split apart. The findings are published in the open-access journal Zoosystematics and Evolution. (2017-03-20)

Ocean acidification to hit West Coast Dungeness crab fishery, new assessment shows
The acidification of the ocean expected as seawater absorbs increasing amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere will reverberate through the West Coast's marine food web, but not necessarily in the ways you might expect, new research shows. (2017-01-12)

Nightlights under the sea
A new study published today in Scientific Reports reveals that 100 feet below the surface of the ocean is a critical depth for ecological activity in the Arctic polar night -- a period of near continuous winter darkness. There, atmospheric light diminishes and bioluminescence from marine organisms becomes the dominant light source. (2016-11-02)

Rising water temperatures and acidification affect important plankton organism
In an experiment with organisms from the Kiel Fjord, a team of biologists from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel demonstrated for the first time, that ocean acidification and rising water temperatures harms the fatty acid composition of copepods in the natural plankton community. As a consequence, fish might find food of poorer quality, the researchers argue in their publication in PLOS ONE. (2016-08-09)

Underwater terrain may be key factor in little auk foraging
Little auks forage in the same areas off East Greenland -- the continental shelf and its edge -- regardless of whether sea ice is present or absent, according to a study published July 20, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Françoise Amélineau from the University of Montpellier, France, and colleagues. (2016-07-20)

Ice algae: The engine of life in the central Arctic Ocean
Algae that live in and under the sea ice play a much greater role for the Arctic food web than previously assumed. In a new study, biologists of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research showed that not only animals that live directly under the ice thrive on carbon produced by so-called ice algae. (2016-07-12)

Organism responsible for paralytic shellfish poisoning may affect fisheries
New research by scientists at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology suggests that ingestion of toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense changes the energy balance and reproductive potential of Calanus finmarchicus in the North Atlantic, which is key food source for young fishes, including many commercially important species. (2016-05-27)

Plankton feces could move plastic pollution to the ocean depths
Plastic waste could find its way deep into the ocean through the feces of plankton, new research from the University of Exeter and Plymouth Marine Laboratory shows. (2016-02-29)

Plankton network linked to ocean's biological carbon pump revealed
The ocean is the largest carbon sink on the planet. The community of planktonic organisms involved in the removal of carbon from the upper layers of the ocean has now been described by oceanographers, biologists and computer scientists, from CNRS, UPMC, Nantes University, VIB, EMBL and CEA. This first overview of the network of species linked to the oceanic biological pump revealed new players as well as the main bacterial functions participating in the process. (2016-02-11)

Waters are more polluted than tests say
Bodies of water are 'sinks', and thereby bind contaminants particularly well. If even slightly toxic concentrations in water are to be detected, the growth and swimming behavior of small crustaceans and copepods should be used for ecotoxicological assessments. This was the conclusion of a scientist from the TUM, who carried out a number of studies on the subject. She also confirmed that it is more informative to test several substances on various aquatic species, rather than carrying out individual toxicity tests. (2015-11-30)

Zooplankton: Not-so-passive motion in turbulence
Imagine a species that is only one millimetre long and has only a limited swimming ability. Yet, its mobility is sufficient for moving, feeding and reproducing in freshwater and seawater. That's exactly what a type of zooplankton of the crustaceans family -- namely the calanoid copepods -- does. In a study published in EPJ E, physicists shed new light on how these zooplankton steer large-scale collective motion under strong turbulence. (2015-11-11)

What does it take to escape the water? Plankton have clues
Dolphins and whales may attract a lot of attention when they leap dramatically out of the water. But aquatic animals thousands of times smaller are accomplished jumpers, too. Their acrobatics often go unnoticed, but understanding them could help improve engineering processes, like oil refining and wastewater treatment, that rely on controlling the interaction of small particles with air-water interfaces. (2015-10-13)

In the dark polar winter, the animals aren't sleeping
You might expect that little happens in the Arctic Ocean during the cold and dark winter. But that just isn't so, according to researchers who have sampled the activities of many different species during three consecutive winters in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard. Their findings are published in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Sept. 24. (2015-09-24)

Tiny plankton can play a major role in CO2 storage in the oceans
Tiny zooplankton animals, each no bigger than a grain of rice, may be playing a huge part in regulating climate change, research involving the University of Strathclyde has found. (2015-09-24)

A whale of a tale
Scientists have found that the gut microbiome of right whales and other baleen species shares characteristics with both cows and meat-eating predators. The dual microbial communities allow whales to extract the most nutrition possible from their diet, digesting not only the copepods they eat, but their chitin-rich shells as well. (2015-09-22)

Omega-3's are vital for a healthy ocean
A new study published this week in Nature Scientific Reports reveals that the 'ocean-fleas' which play a vital role in maintaining a healthy ocean depend on omega-3's to survive. These 2 mm long creatures, called copepods, rank amongst the most abundant animals on our planet. An abundance of copepods results in lots of fish as well as an ocean better able to remove carbon from the atmosphere. (2015-09-17)

Young chum salmon may get biggest nutrition boost from Elliott Bay restored beaches
University of Washington researchers have found the types of organisms in Seattle's Elliott Bay change depending on the shoreline nearby, either armored or restored beaches. Young chum salmon adjusted their diets based on these changes. (2015-09-15)

The secret to the sea sapphire's colors -- and invisibility (video)
Sapphirina, or sea sapphire, has been called 'the most beautiful animal you've never seen,' and it could be one of the most magical. Some of the tiny, little-known copepods appear to flash in and out of brilliantly colored blue, violet or red existence. Now scientists are figuring out the trick to their hues and their invisibility. The findings appear in the Journal of the American Chemical Society and could inspire the next generation of optical technologies. (2015-07-15)

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