Current Coping Strategies News and Events

Current Coping Strategies News and Events, Coping Strategies News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
What is COVID-19's impact on Black and Latino persons living with HIV?
Study looks at COVID-19 effects on engagement in HIV care, HIV medication use, and overall well-being among low-income Black and Latino individuals who have lived with HIV for many years. (2021-02-22)

Pandemic got you down? A little nature could help
Researchers have long been aware of the positive impact of a connection with nature on psychological health and, according to a new study published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences, the pandemic hasn't decreased the power of nature to improve mental well-being. (2021-02-18)

Study sheds light on how people cope with health challenges and medical debt
A recent qualitative study sheds light on how people cope with health and financial challenges, highlighting the important role that communication plays in these coping strategies. (2021-02-16)

New study of goals and beliefs during COVID-19 lockdown shows people still care
A new report has revealed how people's attitudes towards their beliefs and/or accomplishing their short and long-term goals changed amid the unexpected alteration and challenges of lockdown. (2021-02-15)

Grasshoppers and roadblocks: Coping with COVID-19 in rural Mexico
On the outskirts of some small Indigenous communities in the Mexican state of Oaxaca, a few volunteer guards keep watch along roads blocked by makeshift barricades of chains, stones and wood. The invader they are trying to stop is COVID-19. For many of Mexico's Indigenous people, poor and ignored by state and federal governments, the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic is one that rests primarily with themselves. (2021-02-12)

How research on chronic illnesses will improve COVID-19 treatment
A new paper in Oxford Open Immunology, published by Oxford University Press, examines prior findings in the field of neuroimmunology that suggest potential treatment strategies for patients suffering long-term symptoms from COVID-19. (2021-02-10)

COVID-19: 1 in 3 adults anxious, depressed
COVID-19 has led to psychological distress among one in three adults, systematic review and meta-analysis reveals. (2021-01-28)

Age-based COVID-19 vaccine strategy that saves most lives prioritizes elderly, modeling shows
Vaccinating people over 60 is the most effective way to mitigate mortality from COVID-19, a new age-based modeling study suggests. (2021-01-21)

Advances in modeling and sensors can help farmers and insurers manage risk
A review of index insurance for smallholder farmers shows the potential of high-resolution satellite imagery to help poor farmers be compensated for potentially devastating losses. (2021-01-21)

Rescuers at risk: emergency personnel face trauma and post traumatic stress symptoms
Researchers at the University of Bern's Hospital of Psychiatry have for the first time, demonstrated varying levels of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in emergency personnel and rescue workers, with emergency department and psychiatry department staff demonstrating the highest levels of PTSS, suicidal thoughts and dysfunctional coping strategies. The study highlights the urgent need for job-specific training to improve emergency workers' quality of life and ability to cope with work-related trauma. (2021-01-19)

Need to reduce work-related stress? It's a walk in the park
Research from the University of Tsukuba examined the relationship between ''sense of coherence'' (a quality indicative of stress-coping ability) and frequency of walking in forests or greenspaces. The aim was to find easy coping devices for workplace stress. Forest/greenspace walking at least once a week was found to correlate with those with a stronger sense of coherence. The findings suggest the benefits of walking in urban greenspaces or in forests to help with stress management. (2021-01-13)

GSA publishes seven new research articles on COVID-19 and aging
The Gerontological Society of America's highly cited, peer-reviewed journals are continuing to publish scientific articles on COVID-19. The following were published between December 5 and January 6; all are free to access. (2021-01-13)

Hospitals must help their own COVID long-haulers recover, experts argue
Thousands of frontline health care workers risked their lives to save others during the pandemic. Some are suffering long-term complications of COVID-19. Yet there are no clear guidelines in most institutions to provide the necessary support to help their workers recover and return to work. Without accommodations, COVID long-haulers may be forced to leave the health care workforce -- at a time when COVID is surging again. (2021-01-12)

Wives bore the brunt of child care during the shutdown
Traditional gendered patterns of child care persisted during the COVID-19 shutdown, with more than a third of couples relying on women to provide most or all of it. (2021-01-12)

Study: Religion, psychology share methods for reducing distress
Religious people facing life crises rely on emotion-regulation strategies that psychologists also use, a new study finds. They look for positive ways of thinking about hardship, a practice known to psychologists as ''cognitive reappraisal.'' They also tend to have confidence in their ability to cope with difficulty, a trait called ''coping self-efficacy.'' Both have been shown to reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression. (2021-01-08)

Consumers challenged by high status peers make a 'status pivot,' new study finds
When outshone by peers in one area of life, such as financial success, consumers will embrace making a 'status pivot' to show prowess in another aspect of life, such as personal relationships, social life, parenting, physical and mental health, and fitness, according to a new report by researchers from Boston College, Boston University and London Business School. (2020-12-21)

Healthcare workers have increased insomnia, risk of severe mental health problems: COVID-19 study
University of Ottawa global meta-analysis finds significant mental-health consequences for population, but especially healthcare workers. (2020-12-17)

COVID-19 pandemic had big impact on commercial fishing in Northeast
With restaurants and supply chains disrupted due to the global coronavirus pandemic, two-fifths of commercial fishermen surveyed from Maine through North Carolina did not go fishing earlier this year, according to a Rutgers study that also documented their resilience and adaptation. Of those who kept fishing, nearly all reported a decline in income compared with previous years, according to the survey of 258 fishers in the Northeast published in the journal PLOS ONE. (2020-12-17)

How hope can make you happier with your lot
New research finds that that having hope for the future can make you happier with your lot - and protect you from risky behaviours such as drinking and gambling. (2020-12-16)

UC Study: Suicide watch more important now than ever
The study, conducted at UC's Center for Prevention Science, found that between 2015 to 2018, there was a 16% increase in suicide ideation, an 18.6% increase in suicide planning, and an 11.6% increase in suicide attempts. Additionally, significant increases in each behavior were found in African Americans, younger adults, sexual minorities, and individuals who reported past-year drug use. Among these higher-risk groups, the largest increases in suicidal behaviors were African Americans. (2020-12-16)

Pandemic has severely disrupted sleep, increasing stress and medication use
The COVID-19 pandemic is seriously affecting the sleep habits of half of those surveyed in a new study from The Royal Institute of Mental Health Research and the University of Ottawa, leading to further stress and anxiety plus further dependence on sleep medication. The global pandemic's impact on daily routines extends to the bed, according to 'Profiles of sleep changes during the COVID?19 pandemic: Demographic, behavioural and psychological factors'. (2020-12-16)

uOttawa-led study shows that poor sleep can lead to depression in adolescents
Chronic sleep disruption during adolescence can lead to depression in both males and females and alters stress reactivity in females, according to a new study led by University of Ottawa researchers. Their findings are particularly relevant in the context of a pandemic when adolescents' mental health is already under strain. (2020-12-07)

UTSA researchers study the effects of parental job loss on families during the pandemic
A team of UTSA researchers has discovered that economic implications because of COVID-19 can have a devastating ripple effect on children. Monica Lawson, assistant professor of psychology, Megan Piel, assistant professor of social work and Michaela Simon, psychology graduate student in the UTSA College for Health, Community and Policy, have recently published a research article on the effects of parental job loss during the COVID-19 pandemic and risk of psychological and physical abuse toward children. (2020-12-07)

No 'one-size-fits-all solution' for children exposed to domestic violence, researchers say
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University surveyed 105 agencies throughout Ohio to better understand service, policy and research needs--and get feedback about potential strategies to protect children from intimate partner violence. (2020-12-03)

Mothers' stress may lead to preterm births, faster aging in children
Why do some people age faster than others? A new UCLA-led study indicates that a mother's stress prior to giving birth may accelerate her child's biological aging later in life. A second UCLA-led study from the same research group found that women suffering from high stress during the months and even years before conception -- defined as feeling overwhelmed and unable to cope -- had shorter pregnancies than other women. (2020-11-30)

How fishermen have adapted to change over the past 35+ years
An analysis published in Fish and Fisheries notes that marine fisheries are increasingly exposed to external drivers of social and ecological change, and recent changes have had different impacts upon the livelihood strategies favored by fishermen based on the size of their boats. (2020-11-18)

Be mindful: Study shows mindfulness might not work as you expect
If dispositional mindfulness can teach us anything about how we react to stress, it might be an unexpected lesson on its ineffectiveness at managing stress as it's happening, according to new research from the University at Buffalo. When the goal is ''not to sweat the small stuff,'' mindfulness appears to offer little toward achieving that end. (2020-11-13)

Nervous systems of insects inspire efficient future AI systems
Study explores functions of fruit fly's nervous system in food seeking / results valuable for the development and control of artificial intelligence. (2020-11-05)

Study reveals impact of COVID-19 on oncology staff and their work
A study presented at the NCRI Virtual Showcase reports the results of a survey of oncology staff on their management of patients, their wellbeing and whether they felt valued during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-10-29)

Precaution: Lessons from COVID-19
Which is more important in the initial phase of a pandemic: taking precautionary actions or responding to its severity? That is the question that researchers from SUTD set out to address in an article published in BioEssays. (2020-10-27)

City, University of London academics develop algorithm to analyse HeLa cancer cells
Dr Constantino Carlos Reyes-Aldasoro and Dr Cefa Karabag collaborate with the Francis Crick Institute on a novel approach published in the PLoS ONE journal, which significantly reduces the amount of time taken to analyse the cell line named after Henrietta Lacks, an African-American woman whose contribution to medical science was only formally acknowledged decades after her death. (2020-10-26)

Relieving the cost of COVID-19 by Parrondo's paradox
The health and well-being of the population will be affected if the community is kept open, but the lockdown strategy taken on due to COVID-19 also incurs economic and financial impacts. Each strategy on its own will increase the total 'cost' to society. Can both losing strategies be combined in a manner that leads to a winning outcome? (2020-10-22)

COVID-19 anxiety linked to body image issues
A new study has found that anxiety and stress directly linked to COVID-19 could be causing a number of body image issues. The research, which involved 506 UK adults, found that worries linked to COVID-19 were associated with body dissatisfaction and a desire for thinness in women, and associated with body fat dissatisfaction and a desire for muscularity in men. (2020-10-22)

Study reveals why some blame Asian Americans for COVID-19
A blend of racial prejudice, poor coping and partisan media viewing were found in Americans who stigmatized people of Asian descent during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study. But it was prejudice against Asian Americans that was most strongly linked to beliefs that Asians were responsible for the pandemic and most at risk for spreading it, results showed. (2020-10-20)

New study examines what human physiology can tell us about how animals cope with stress
Research from the University of South Florida offers a novel perspective on how vertebrates may regulate flexibility in coping with stress. (2020-10-14)

Long-term, frequent phone counseling helps cancer patients who smoke quit
Recently diagnosed cancer patients who smoke are significantly more likely to quit and remain tobacco-free if they receive frequent and sustained telephone counseling, according to a new study. The study offers hope that these patients will respond better to treatment and enjoy improved quality of life while coping with cancer. (2020-10-13)

Factors that increase or decrease suicidal behavior risk in adolescents
An analysis of relevant studies published to date has identified certain risk factors associated with suicidal behavior in adolescents. The analysis also revealed certain protective factors that may reduce the likelihood of suicidal behavior. (2020-10-07)

Social media use linked with depression, secondary trauma during COVID-19
Can't stop checking social media for the latest COVID-19 health information? You might want to take a break, according to researchers at Penn State and Jinan University who discovered that excessive use of social media for COVID-19 health information is related to both depression and secondary trauma. (2020-09-29)

Pandemic sets off future wave of worsening mental health issues
Long after a COVID-19 vaccination is developed and years after the coronavirus death toll is tallied, the impact on mental health will linger, continuing to inflict damage if not addressed, according to new research. A psychology researcher at the University of Houston has published two papers discussing the psychological, addictive and health behavior issues related to the COVID-19 pandemic from a behavioral science perspective. (2020-09-28)

Born to be wild: Fungal highways let bacteria travel in exchange for thiamine
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found a fungal-bacterial relationship that allows bacteria to travel along fungal highways and supply the fungus with thiamine (vitamin B1), which is essential to most organisms. Thiamine provided by the bacteria helped the fungal filaments to grow, and the highways let the bacteria travel farther than otherwise possible. Research in this area could be applied to settings ranging from fermentation to plant and human disease mechanisms. (2020-09-24)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.