Current Copper News and Events

Current Copper News and Events, Copper News Articles.
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Making swimming pools safer by reducing chlorine disinfection byproducts
Swimming in indoor or outdoor pools is a healthy form of exercise and recreation for many people. However, studies have linked compounds that arise from chlorine disinfection of the pools to respiratory problems, including asthma, in avid swimmers. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have found that using a complementary form of disinfection, known as copper-silver ionization (CSI), can decrease disinfection byproducts and cell toxicity of chlorinated swimming pool water. (2021-02-17)

Russian scientists significantly improved coal-burning efficiency
A team of Russian scientists from NUST MISIS, Tomsk Polytechnic University (TPU) and Boreskov Institute of Catalysis has suggested a new approach to modifying the combustion behavior of coal. The addition of copper salts reduces the content of unburnt carbon in ash residue by 3.1 times and CO content in the gaseous combustion products by 40%, the scientists found. The research was published in Fuel Processing Technology. (2021-02-10)

AD diagnostics could become more accessible
A team of researchers from the Laboratory of Biophysics at NUST MISIS, Lomonosov Moscow State University and D. Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia has summarized metal-containing diagnostic agents for positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of Alzheimer's disease (AD). According to the researchers, their use could improve access to diagnostic imaging of AD among the risk groups. (2021-02-09)

Research identifies more sustainable, cost-effective approach to treating citrus canker
Behlau and his colleagues showed that it is possible to control citrus canker by spraying much less water and copper. ''By adjusting both copper and water usage based on the volume of the citrus trees without affecting the quality of disease control, we have taken an important step to a more economically and environmentally sustainable citrus industry.'' (2021-02-03)

Novel photocatalyst effectively turns carbon dioxide into methane fuel with light
Decarbonising has become a prioritised mission in many countries and the science community is working on the ''carbon capture'' technologies. If the captured carbon dioxide could be converted into energy, then it would be killing two birds with one stone. A joint research team led by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has developed a new photocatalyst which can produce methane gas (CH4) selectively and effectively from carbon dioxide using sunlight and mimicking photosynthesis. (2021-02-02)

A glimpse into the wardrobe of King David and King Solomon, 3000 years ago
In groundbreaking research, archaeologists have recovered scraps of fabric dyed in royal purple from the time of King David and King Solomon. According to the researchers, 'The color immediately attracted our attention, but we found it hard to believe we had found true purple from such an ancient era'. (2021-01-28)

Bioorthogonally catalyzed lethality strategy generates targeting drugs within tumor
Selectively killing tumor while not causing damage to normal cells still remains a challenge in cancer chemotherapy. Professor Hongke Liu from Nanjing Normal University together with Professor Jing Zhao and Professor Zijian Guo from Nanjing University developed a novel strategy---bioorthogonally-catalyzed lethality to generate efficient anticancer species between two non-toxic components only within cancer cells and tumors without external catalysts, realizing the precise and efficient anticancer chemotherapy. (2021-01-25)

An anode-free zinc battery that could someday store renewable energy
Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, could help decrease the world's reliance on fossil fuels. But first, power companies need a safe, cost-effective way to store the energy for later use. Massive lithium-ion batteries can do the job, but they suffer from safety issues and limited lithium availability. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have made a prototype of an anode-free, zinc-based battery that uses low-cost, naturally abundant materials. (2021-01-20)

Evolution in a test tube: these bacteria survive on deadly copper surfaces
The descendants of regular wild-type bacteria can evolve to survive for a long time on metallic copper surfaces that would usually kill them within a few minutes. An international research team led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the Bundeswehr Institute of Microbiology was able to produce these tiny survivalists in the lab and has been able to study them more closely. The team reports on its findings in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. (2021-01-13)

Copper-indium oxide: A faster and cooler way to reduce our carbon footprint
Emergent e-fuel technologies often employ the reverse water-gas shift (RWGS) reaction to convert atmospheric CO2 to CO. While efficient, this reaction requires high temperatures and complex gas separation for high performance. However, for the first time in the world, scientists from Japan have now demonstrated record-high CO2 conversion rates at relatively low temperatures in a modified chemical-looping version of RWGS using a novel copper-indium oxide. (2021-01-13)

New process more efficiently recycles excess CO2 into fuel, study finds
For years, researchers have worked to repurpose excess atmospheric carbon dioxide into new chemicals, fuels and other products traditionally made from hydrocarbons harvested from fossil fuels. The recent push to mitigate the climactic effects of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has chemists on their toes to find the most efficient means possible. A new study introduces an electrochemical reaction, enhanced by polymers, to improve CO2-to-ethylene conversion efficiency over previous attempts. (2021-01-11)

Carbon monoxide reduced to valuable liquid fuels
Rice engineers develop a reactor to produce liquid acetic acid directly from carbon monoxide. (2021-01-11)

High-flux table-top source for femtosecond hard X-ray pulses
Researchers at the Max Born Institute (MBI) in Berlin have now accomplished a breakthrough in table-top generation of femtosecond X-ray pulses by demonstrating a stable pulse train at kilohertz repetition rate with a total flux of some 10^12 X-ray photons per second. (2021-01-07)

Researchers turn coal powder into graphite in microwave oven
The University of Wyoming team created an environment in a microwave oven to successfully convert raw coal powder into nano-graphite, which is used as a lubricant and in items ranging from fire extinguishers to lithium ion batteries. (2021-01-06)

Imaging of ballistic wounds, bullet composition and implications for MRI safety
According to an article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), because patients with ballistic embedded fragments are frequently denied MRI (due to indeterminate bullet composition sans shell casings), radiography and CT can be used to identify nonferromagnetic projectiles that are safe for MRI. (2020-12-29)

Alzheimer's disease: regulating copper in the brain stops memory loss among mice
Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques1 in the patient's brain. These plaques sequester copper, and contain approximately five times as much as a healthy brain. Two CNRS scientists from the Coordination Chemistry Laboratory recently developed, with their colleagues from the Guangdong University of Technology and Shenzhen University (China), a molecule that regulates the circulation of copper in the brain. (2020-12-17)

New theranostic approach reduces tumor volume and increases survival in NET study
A pair of copper radionuclides that target the somatostatin receptor overexpressed in neuroendocrine tumors has proven successful in identifying tumors and improving survival. According to new research published in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, the imaging agent 64Cu-CuSarTate produced high-quality positron emission tomography (PET) images in a mouse model of neuroendocrine tumors, while its therapeutic counterpart, 67Cu-CuSarTate, was highly effective in reducing tumor volume and extending lifespan. (2020-12-16)

Experiment to test quantum gravity just got a bit less complicated
Is gravity a quantum phenomenon? That has been one of the big outstanding questions in physics for decades. Together with colleagues from the UK, Anupam Mazumdar, a physicist from the University of Groningen, proposed an experiment that could settle the issue. However, it requires studying two very large entangled quantum systems in freefall. In a new paper, Mazumdar presents a way to reduce background noise to make this experiment more manageable. (2020-12-08)

Cooling electronics efficiently with graphene-enhanced heat pipes
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have found that graphene-based heat pipes can help solve the problems of cooling electronics and power systems used in avionics, data centres, and other power electronics. (2020-12-03)

Carbon dioxide converted to ethylene -- the 'rice of the industry'
In recent times, 'e-chemical' technology -- which converts carbon dioxide to high-value-added compounds using renewable electricity -- has gained research attention as a carbon capture utilization technology. Ethylene, referred to as the 'rice of the industry,' is widely used to produce various chemical products and polymers, but it is more challenging to produce from electrochemical CO2 reduction. To overcome this limitation, a domestic research team in South Korea has made a breakthrough in unveiling a key path-triggering intermediate in the ethylene production reaction. (2020-12-02)

Nanomaterials enable dual-mode heating and cooling device
Engineers at Duke University have demonstrated a dual-mode heating and cooling device for building climate control that, if widely deployed in the U.S., could cut HVAC energy use by nearly 20 percent. The invention uses a combination of mechanics and nanomaterials to either harness or expel certain wavelengths of light. Depending on conditions, rollers move a sheet back and forth to expose either heat-trapping materials or cooling materials. (2020-12-02)

Ultrasensitive transistor for herbicide detection in water
University of Tokyo researchers have fabricated a tiny electronic sensor that can detect very low levels of a commonly used weed killer in drinking water. (2020-12-01)

Ultrathin spray-applied MXene antennas are ready for 5G
New antennas so thin that they can be sprayed into place are also robust enough to provide a strong signal at bandwidths that will be used by fifth-generation (5G) mobile devices. Performance results for the antennas, which are made from a new type of two-dimensional material called MXene, were recently reported by researchers at Drexel University and could have rammifications for mobile, wearable and connected ''internet of things'' technology. (2020-11-30)

New material 'mines' copper from toxic wastewater
A team of scientists led by Berkeley Lab has designed a new material -- called ZIOS (zinc imidazole salicylaldoxime) -- that targets and traps copper ions from wastewater with unprecedented precision and speed. The technology offers the water industry and the research community the first blueprint for a water-remediation technology that scavenges heavy metal ions with a measure of control that far surpasses the current state of the art. (2020-11-24)

Quantum magic squares
The magic of mathematics is particularly reflected in magic squares. Recently, quantum physicist Gemma De las Cuevas and mathematicians Tim Netzer and Tom Drescher introduced the notion of the quantum magic square, and for the first time studied in detail the properties of this quantum version of magic squares. (2020-11-24)

Team uses copper to image Alzheimer's aggregates in the brain
A proof-of-concept study conducted in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease offers new evidence that copper isotopes can be used to detect the amyloid-beta protein deposits that form in the brains of people living with -- or at risk of developing -- Alzheimer's. (2020-11-24)

Alternative gene control mechanism based on organization of DNA within nucleus
Researchers at the University of Tokyo have identified how the architecture of the cell nucleus can change gene activity in plants. This discovery reveals fundamental knowledge about genome regulation and points towards future methods for potentially manipulating the expression of many genes simultaneously. (2020-11-20)

Palladium, meet copper: Skoltech researchers use machine learning to improve catalysts
Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues from Germany and the US have studied the properties and behavior of a palladium-copper alloy under changing temperatures and hydrogen concentrations, with highly relevant implications of this research for catalyst design. The authors hope that their findings can open the door for designing metal alloys with better catalytic properties by taking into account dynamic changes in the composition and structure of materials at realistic operational conditions. (2020-11-17)

Scientists discover a new mineral
The research team headed by Stanislav Filatov, Professor at the Department of Crystallography at St Petersburg University, has discovered a new mineral species in Kamchatka - petrovite. The scientists named the find in honour of Tomas Petrov, an outstanding crystallographer and Professor at St Petersburg University. He together with his students Arkady Glikin and Sergei Moshkin, was the first in the world to create a technology for growing jewellery malachite. (2020-11-16)

3D printing -- a 'dusty' business?
3D printers are becoming increasingly popular. They can be used to create a wide variety of three-dimensional objects based on computer templates. For example, depending on the method used, objects can be printed using plastics, synthetic resins, ceramics or metal. The material is applied layer by layer and, in doing so, building the printed object. But what about health risks from the extremely fine particles and volatile chemical substances that might be released and inhaled during printing? (2020-11-12)

NIST designs a prototype fuel gauge for orbit
Liquids aren't as well behaved in space as they are on Earth. Inside a spacecraft, microgravity allows liquids to freely slosh and float about. This behavior has made fuel quantity in satellites difficult to pin down, but a new 3D-imaging fuel gauge engineered at the National Institute of Standards and Technology could offer an ideal solution. (2020-11-12)

Use of some contraceptives may temporarily delay a woman's fertility from resuming
Women who stop using some forms of contraception may have to wait up to eight months before their fertility returns, suggests research published online in The BMJ. (2020-11-11)

The importance of good neighbors in catalysis
Are you affected by your neighbors? So are nanoparticles in catalysts. New research from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, published in the journals Science Advances and Nature Communications, reveals how the nearest neighbors determine how well nanoparticles work in a catalyst. (2020-11-03)

Face mask aims to deactivate virus to protect others
Researchers have developed a face mask with an embedded antiviral layer that sanitizes the wearer's respiratory droplets to make them less infectious to others. (2020-10-29)

UCF researcher is working to extend battery life in smartphones, electric cars
A University of Central Florida researcher is working to make portable devices and electric vehicles stay charged longer by extending the life of the rechargeable lithium-ion batteries powering them. He is doing this by making the batteries more efficient, with some of his latest work focusing on keeping the anode from falling apart over time. The new technique is detailed in the journal Advanced Materials. (2020-10-26)

RUDN University chemist suggested synthesizing bioactive substances using a copper catalyst
A chemist from RUDN University used a copper catalyst in the click reaction of triazole synthesis. Triazoles are bioactive substances that are used to treat fungal diseases and synthesize pharmaceutical drugs and also play a role in polymer chemistry. The catalyst not only accelerated the reaction several times but also helped perform it at room temperature and without any bases or solvents. The reaction turned out to be almost 100% effective and had no by-products. (2020-10-22)

Cicada-inspired waterproof surfaces closer to reality, researchers report
A multidisciplinary group that studies the physical and chemical properties of insect wings has demonstrated the ability to reproduce the nanostructures that help cicada wings repel water and prevent bacteria from establishing on the surface. The new technique - which uses commercial nail polish - is economical and straightforward, and the researchers said it will help fabricate future high-tech waterproof materials. (2020-10-22)

Oxygen can do a favor to synthesize metal-organic frameworks
IBS scienetists have identified how oxygen affects the synthesis of a novel metal-organic framework. (2020-10-21)

A new approach boosts lithium-ion battery efficiency and puts out fires, too
Building new functionality into an overlooked lithium-ion battery component addresses two major goals of battery research: extending the driving range of electric vehicles and reducing the danger that laptops, cell phones and other devices will burst into flames. (2020-10-15)

UNLV and University of Rochester physicists observe room-temperature superconductivity
Physicists from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and the University of Rochester have made a breakthrough in the long sought-after quest for a room-temperature superconductor, what they call the ''holy grail'' of energy efficiency. (2020-10-14)

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