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Current Coral Reefs News and Events, Coral Reefs News Articles.
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Enhanced rock weathering could counter fossil-fuel emissions and protect our oceans
Scientists have discovered enhanced weathering of rock could counter man-made fossil fuel CO2 emissions and help to protect our oceans. (2015-12-14)
Scientists warn light pollution can stop coral from spawning
Sexual reproduction is one of the most important processes for the persistence of coral reefs and disrupting it could threaten their long-term health and the marine life they support. (2015-12-14)
Targeted assistance needed to fight poverty in developing coastal communities
Researchers say there needs to be a better understanding of how conservation and aid projects in developing countries impact the people they are designed to help. (2015-12-11)
New theory of Okinawan coral migration and diversity proposed
OIST's genome analysis of coral population leads to new findings about Okinawan coral reefs. (2015-12-10)
Coral reefs could be more vulnerable to coastal development than predicted
For years, many scientists thought we had a secret weapon to protect coral reefs from nutrients flushed into the seas by human activity. (2015-12-08)
UM researchers study sediment record in deep coral reefs
A University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science-led research team analyzed the sediments of mesophotic coral reefs, deep reef communities living 30-150 meters below sea level, to understand how habitat diversity at these deeper depths may be recorded in the sedimentary record. (2015-12-02)
Sylvester presents latest cancer research at ASH Annual Meeting
Researchers from Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine will present a selection of the latest advances in hematology research at this year's American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting, Dec. (2015-12-02)
Even thermally tolerant corals are in hot water when it comes to bleaching
Scientists have discovered that corals adapted to naturally high temperatures, such as those off the north west coast of Australia, are nonetheless highly susceptible to heat stress and bleaching. (2015-12-02)
How fish minimize their visibility to predators in open waters
Though the open ocean leaves few places for fish to hide from predators, some species have evolved a way to manipulate the light that fills it to camouflage themselves, a new study finds. (2015-11-19)
Fossil fireworm species named after rock musician
A muscly fossil fireworm, discovered by scientists from the University of Bristol and the Natural History Museum, has been named Rollinschaeta myoplena in honor of punk musician and spoken word artist, Henry Rollins. (2015-11-19)
Fat makes coral fit to cope with climate change
A year ago, researchers discovered that fat helps coral survive heat stress over the short term -- and now it seems that fat helps coral survive over the long term, too. (2015-11-17)
Oceans -- and ocean activism -- deserve broader role in climate change discussions
Researchers argue that both ocean scientists and world leaders should pay more attention to how communities are experiencing, adapting to and even influencing changes in the world's oceans. (2015-11-12)
Scientists measure the 'beauty' of coral reefs
Almost every person has an appreciation for natural environments. In addition, most people find healthy or pristine locations with high biodiversity more beautiful and aesthetically pleasing than environmentally degraded locations. (2015-11-10)
Complex skeletons evolved earlier than realized, fossils suggest
The first animals to have complex skeletons existed about 550 million years ago, fossils of a tiny marine creature unearthed in Namibia suggest. (2015-11-06)
Marine invasive species benefiting from rising carbon dioxide levels
Ocean acidification may well be helping invasive species of algae, jellyfish, crabs and shellfish to move to new areas of the planet with damaging consequences, according to the findings of a new report. (2015-11-06)
The astounding genome of the dinoflagellate
Dinoflagellates live free-floating in the ocean or symbiotically with corals, serving up -- or as -- lunch to a host of mollusks, tiny fish and coral species. (2015-11-05)
Marine reserves will need stepping stones to help fishes disperse between them
A massive field effort on the Belizean Barrier Reef has revealed for the first time that the offspring of at least one coral reef fish, a neon goby, do not disperse far from their parents. (2015-10-27)
Distressed damsels cry for help
Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have found that fish release a chemical 'distress call' when caught by predators, dramatically boosting their chances of survival. (2015-10-27)
Distressed damsels cry for help
In a world first study researchers from Uppsala University, Sweden and James Cook University in Australia and have found that prey fish captured by predators release chemical cues that acts as a 'distress call', dramatically boosting their chances for survival. (2015-10-27)
Response to environmental change depends on variation in corals and algae partnerships
Some corals are more protective than others of their partner algae in harsh environmental conditions, new research reveals. (2015-10-26)
Sunscreen is proven toxic to coral reefs
Tel Aviv University researchers have discovered that a chemical found in most sunscreen lotions poses an existential threat to young corals, posing a major danger to the marine environment. (2015-10-20)
Lathering up with sunscreen may protect against cancer -- killing coral reefs worldwide
Lathering up with sunscreen may prevent sunburn and protect against cancer, but it is also killing coral reefs around the world. (2015-10-20)
Scientists find some thrive in acid seas
Researchers from James Cook University have found that ocean acidification may not be all bad news for one important sea-dwelling plant. (2015-10-19)
Rising seas will drown mangrove forests
Mangrove forests around the Indo-Pacific region could be submerged by 2070, international research published today says. (2015-10-14)
Global marine analysis suggests food chain collapse
A world-first global analysis of marine responses to climbing human CO2 emissions has painted a grim picture of future fisheries and ocean ecosystems. (2015-10-12)
Marine mathematics helps to map undiscovered deep-water coral reefs
A team of marine scientists has discovered four new deep-water coral reefs in the Atlantic Ocean using the power of predictive mathematical models. (2015-10-12)
NOAA declares third ever global coral bleaching event
As record ocean temperatures cause widespread coral bleaching across Hawaii, NOAA scientists confirm the same stressful conditions are expanding to the Caribbean and may last into the new year, prompting the declaration of the third global coral bleaching event ever on record. (2015-10-08)
We Robot 2016 April 1-2 at University of Miami
We Robot 2016 is a conference at the intersection of the law, policy, and technology of robotics, to be held in Coral Gables, Florida on April 1-2, 2016. (2015-10-05)
Self-regulating corals protect their skeletons against ocean acidification
Scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies have found a species of coral living in a dynamic reef system, which is able to protect itself from the impact of ocean acidification. (2015-10-05)
University of Montana student, professor discover earliest Jurassic corals
Five times in Earth's history mass extinction events have wiped out up to 90 percent of global life. (2015-10-01)
Researchers in Northwestern Hawaiian Islands finds highest rates of unique marine species
Scientists returned from a 28-day research expedition aboard NOAA Ship Hi'ialakai exploring the deep coral reefs within Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. (2015-10-01)
A balanced diet is good for corals too, study finds
A new study found that a nutrient-rich, balanced diet is beneficial to corals during stressful thermal events. (2015-10-01)
GSA Today study documents rare early Jurassic corals from North America
Mass extinction events punctuate the evolution of marine environments, and recovery biotas paved the way for major biotic changes. (2015-09-29)
Tools for illuminating brain function make their own light
A variant on the optogenetics technique gives neuroscientists the choice of activating neurons with light or an externally supplied chemical. (2015-09-29)
I've got your back -- fishes really do look after their mates!
When it comes to helping each other out, it turns out that some fish are better at it than previously thought. (2015-09-25)
Past spikes in carbon dioxide levels accompanied by high ocean circulation
Two abrupt rises in carbon dioxide and Northern Hemispheric warming occurred during the last glacial ice melt, and new evidence confirms that these spikes were accompanied by deep ocean 'flushing' events. (2015-09-24)
The Micronesia Challenge: Sustainable coral reefs and fisheries
The University of Guam Marine Laboratory leads the way in research to demonstrate how scientists help managers measure the effectiveness of marine conservation efforts. (2015-09-23)
New weapon against the reef eaters
James Cook University scientists in Australia have made a breakthrough in the war against a deadly enemy of the Great Barrier Reef. (2015-09-22)
UW labs win $4.5 million NSF nanotechnology infrastructure grant
The University of Washington and Oregon State University have won a $4.5 million, five-year grant from the National Science Foundation to advance nanoscale science, engineering and technology research in the Pacific Northwest and support a new network of user sites across the country. (2015-09-16)
Marine biologists develop portable kit to preserve coral DNA at sea
A new portable laboratory kit devel­oped by sci­en­tists at Northeastern University and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration extracts tissue and pre­serves the sam­ples' DNA in record time, per­mit­ting the sci­en­tists to archive large amounts of the pre­cious genetic mate­rial while in the field on expeditions. (2015-09-09)
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