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Current Coral Reefs News and Events, Coral Reefs News Articles.
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Surviving harsh environments becomes a death-trap for specialist corals
The success of corals that adapt to survive in the world's hottest sea could contribute to their demise through global warming, according to new research. (2015-05-20)
Ocean head count: Scientists develop new methods to track ocean biodiversity
How can you track changes in complex marine ecosystems over time? (2015-05-12)
University of Miami's RoboCanes win RoboCup US Open 2015
The RoboCanes, the University of Miami's team of autonomous soccer-playing robots developed by students and faculty in the College of Arts & Sciences Computer Science Department, won the 2015 RoboCup US Open -- claiming victory for the first time since entering the competition in 2012. (2015-05-11)
Scientists go high-tech to study fragile cold-water reefs
Coral reefs are generally associated with warm, shallow and crystal-clear waters in the tropics. (2015-05-06)
NASA IMERG sees Australia's bicoastal rainfall
The rainfall accumulation analysis above was computed from data generated by the Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) during the period from April 28 to May 3, 2015. (2015-05-05)
Slowdown after Ice Age sounds a warning for Great Barrier Reef's future
Environmental factors similar to those affecting the present day Great Barrier Reef have been linked to a major slowdown in its growth 8,000 years ago, research led by the University of Sydney, Australia shows. (2015-05-05)
Study shows dietary supplements are good for coral health
Most people know the health benefits of taking daily supplements, but what about endangered corals? (2015-05-04)
New climate projections paint bleak future for tropical coral reefs
As greater atmospheric carbon dioxide boosts sea temperatures, tropical corals face a bleak future. (2015-05-04)
Endangered corals smothered by sponges on overfished Caribbean reefs
For reef-building corals, sponges do not make good neighbors. Aggressive competitors for space, sponges use toxins, mucus, shading, and smothering to kill adjacent coral colonies and then grow on their skeletons. (2015-04-28)
New study shows parrotfish are critical to coral reef island building
As well as being a beautiful species capable of changing its colour, shape and even gender, new research published today shows that parrotfish, commonly found on healthy coral reefs, can also play a pivotal role in providing the sands necessary to build and maintain coral reef islands. (2015-04-28)
A new coral-inhabiting gall crab species discovered from Indonesia and Malaysia
Fieldwork in Indonesia and Malaysia by researcher Sancia van der Meij from Naturalis Biodiversity Center in the Netherlands lead to the discovery of a new coral-dwelling gall crab. (2015-04-27)
First invasive lionfish discovered in Brazil
A single fish caught with a hand spear off the Brazilian coast is making big waves across the entire southwestern Atlantic. (2015-04-22)
Fishing impacts on the Great Barrier Reef
New research shows that fishing is having a significant impact on the make-up of fish populations of the Great Barrier Reef. (2015-04-21)
Let it snow
Before Deepwater Horizon, scientists didn't know that oil and marine snow had anything to do with each other. (2015-04-20)
Researchers produce first atlas of airborne microbes across United States
A University of Colorado Boulder and North Carolina State University-led team has produced the first atlas of airborne microbes across the continental US, a feat that has implications for better understanding health and disease in humans, animals and crops. (2015-04-20)
Fish type, body size can help predict nutrient recycling rates
The nutrients excreted by fish in their 'pee' may be critical to the health of coastal ecosystems. (2015-04-16)
Dispersant used to clean Deepwater Horizon spill more toxic to corals than the oil
The dispersant used to remediate the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is more toxic to cold-water corals in lower concentrations than the spilled oil. (2015-04-09)
Mysteries of the deep
Scientists who have spent much of their careers in deep-sea submersibles observing coral and sponges are sharing their experiences and expertise through innovative online seminars. (2015-04-08)
Recovery potential for the world's coral reef fish
A simple test of the number of fish living on a coral reef can be used as a road map to restore degraded reefs and fishers' livelihoods according to a global study published in the journal Nature. (2015-04-08)
Recipe for saving coral reefs: Add more fish
Fish are the key ingredients in a new recipe to diagnose and restore degraded coral reef ecosystems, according to scientists from the Australian Institute of Marine Science, the Wildlife Conservation Society, James Cook University and other organizations in a new study in the journal Nature. (2015-04-08)
We can fix the Great Barrier Reef
Leading coral reef scientists say Australia could restore the Great Barrier Reef to its former glory through better policies that focus on science, protection and conservation. (2015-04-06)
NOAA study provides detailed projections of coral bleaching
New NOAA research shows that while nearly all coral reefs in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico will experience bleaching by mid-century, there will be great variety in the timing and location of these harmful effects. (2015-04-01)
Ocean-scale dataset allows broad view of human influence on Pacific coral reef ecosystems
A study published today by scientists at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the University of Victoria in the journal PLOS ONE draws on data from nearly 40 islands and atolls across the central and western Pacific, including 25 unpopulated islands, to investigate the relative influence of environmental variation and human presence on reef fish assemblages. (2015-04-01)
Equatorial fish babies in hot water
Scientists have discovered that rising ocean temperatures slow the development of baby fish around the equator, raising concerns about the impact of global warming on fish and fisheries in the tropics. (2015-03-30)
A decade in, have Australia's no-take reserves protected life on the Reef?
The expansion of no-take marine reserves within Australia's Great Barrier Reef Marine Park more than a decade ago is working to protect fish just as experts had hoped it would, say researchers who have been monitoring the reef via underwater surveys. (2015-03-26)
2°C climate change target 'utterly inadequate'
The official global target of a 2°C temperature rise is 'utterly inadequate' for protecting those at most risk from climate change, says a lead author on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, writing in the open-access journal Climate Change Responses. (2015-03-26)
Twice the coral trout in Great Barrier Reef protected zones
Twice the coral trout in Great Barrier Reef protected zones Coral trout in protected 'green zones' are not only bigger and more abundant than those in fished 'blue zones' of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, but they are also better able to cope with cyclone damage, according to a long-term study published today in Current Biology. (2015-03-26)
Florida Tech study finds climate refuges where corals survive, grow
As rising ocean temperatures continue to fuel the disappearance of reef-building corals, a new study from Florida Tech finds there may be some climate refuges where corals will survive in the future. (2015-03-25)
Government action needed on iconic World Heritage ecosystems
Without better local management, the world's most iconic ecosystems, UNESCO World Heritage sites are at risk of collapse under climate change, say researchers in a study published in the journal Science. (2015-03-19)
Color-morphing reef fish is a 'wolf in sheep's clothing'
The dottyback changes its color to match surrounding damselfish species, enabling it to counter the defenses of its damselfish prey by disguising itself as a harmless part of their community, then swooping in to hunt their young. (2015-03-19)
Smoke and mirrors on coral reefs: How a tiny fish deceives its prey
Basel Zoologists are unveiling the colorful secrets of coral reefs: On the Australian Great Barrier Reef they discovered a coral reef fish, the dusky dottyback that flexibly adapts its coloration to mimic other fishes and in doing is able to prey on their juvenile offspring. (2015-03-19)
World Heritage Sites risk collapse without stronger local management
Without better local management, the world's most iconic ecosystems are at risk of collapse under climate change, say researchers in Science. (2015-03-19)
2015 Harriet Evelyn Wallace Scholarship winners announced
The American Geosciences Institute would like to congratulate Emma Reed and Annette Patton, both Master's candidates, as the two latest recipients of the Harriet Evelyn Wallace Scholarship. (2015-03-16)
Rare glimpse into how coral procreates could aid future conservation
A rare and threatened Caribbean coral species has for the first time been successfully bred and raised in the lab, according to research published in the open-access journal BMC Ecology. (2015-03-15)
Tropical Cyclone Nathan crawling in NASA satellite imagery
Tropical Cyclone Nathan has made its cyclonic loop in the Coral Sea near Queensland, Australia's Cape York Peninsula, and is headed away from land. (2015-03-13)
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Olwyn nearing landfall in Australia
Tropical Cyclone Olwyn was close to making landfall in the northern region of Western Australia when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead. (2015-03-12)
Cells target giant protein crystals for degradation
Researchers at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan engineered a fluorescent protein that rapidly assembles into large crystals inside living cells, and showed that cells actively targeted the crystals for degradation. (2015-03-12)
James Cook University in major study on rapid fish acclimatization
A JCU team from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies has been granted more than $600,000 to find out why fish exposed to high water temperatures have offspring that are born already acclimatized to the high temperatures. (2015-03-04)
Newly discovered algal species helps corals survive in the hottest reefs on the planet
A new species of algae has been discovered in reef corals of the Persian Gulf where it helps corals to survive seawater temperatures of up to 36 degrees Celsius -- temperatures that would kill corals elsewhere. (2015-02-27)
Pew names 5 new marine conservation fellows for 2015
Five distinguished scientists and conservationists from Canada, Australia, Russia, and the United Kingdom are the 2015 recipients of the Pew fellowship in marine conservation. (2015-02-24)
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