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Better diabetes treatment: New insulin molecule can self-regulate blood sugar
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen and biotech firm Gubra have developed a new insulin molecule that will make blood sugar regulation both easier and safer for those with type 1 diabetes. (2020-12-03)

Autism study suggests connection between repetitive behaviors, gut problems
In children with autism, repetitive behaviors and gastrointestinal problems may be connected, new research has found. The study found that increased severity of other autism symptoms was also associated with more severe constipation, stomach pain and other gut difficulties. (2020-12-02)

Scientists identify new genetic MND risk factor in junk DNA
Researchers from the University of Sheffield have identified a new genetic risk factor for Motor Neurone Disease (MND). (2020-12-01)

New mechanism of pain control revealed
Researchers have identified a unique population of astrocytes in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord of mice that produces pain hypersensitivity when activated by neurons carrying signals down from the brain. The findings indicate that the role of descending neurons in controlling spinal pain transmission is not limited to suppression and point to this group of astrocytes as a new target for enhancing the effect of chronic pain treatments. (2020-11-25)

Trinity researchers discover how the brain 're-wires' after disease
Trinity College researchers are studying how the brain re-wires itself in neurological disease. The team is building treatments for today's more common global conditions like Motor Neurone Disease (MND/ALS) and Spinal Muscular Atrophy and their findings could impact rehabilitation for patients, the discovery of effective drugs and quantifying the potential efficacy of new therapies. (2020-11-24)

Biofriendly protocells pump up blood vessels
In a new study published today in Nature Chemistry, Professor Stephen Mann and Dr Mei Li from Bristol's School of Chemistry, together with Associate Professor Jianbo Liu and colleagues at Hunan University and Central South University in China, prepared synthetic protocells coated in red blood cell fragments for use as nitric oxide generating bio-bots within blood vessels. (2020-11-20)

New non-invasive technology could spot early signs of motor disorders in babies
Imperial College London scientists have created the world's first non-invasive way to map how baby movements are generated on a neuronal level. (2020-11-20)

Lovestruck by oxytocin! Novel roles of the hormone in controlling male sexual function
Hormones are the master regulators of sexual functions in mammals. The hormone oxytocin has a well-established role in social bonding, sexual function, maternal instinct, nursing, and lactation. Researchers from Okayama University have now explored the roles of oxytocin in male sexual function for the first time. Findings from the study suggest that oxytocin-mediated control of male sexual function via the spinal cord may in fact be instrumental in treating erectile dysfunction. (2020-11-18)

Blood biomarkers for detecting brain injury in COVID-19 patients
COVID-19 can directly cause neurologic symptoms and long-term neurological disease. Elevations of blood biomarkers indicative of brain injury have been reported in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of COVID-19 patients. Clinical application of blood biomarkers to improve medical management of COVID-19 patients (2020-11-17)

Reversal of glial scar tissue back to neuronal tissue through neuroregenerative gene therapy
Brain or spinal cord injury often results in glial scar tissue that is correlated to neural functional loss. Glial scar is a well-known obstacle for neural regeneration. A research team led by Prof. Gong Chen at Jinan University, Guangzhou, published an article in the current issue of Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience, demonstrating that glial scar tissue can be reversed back to neuronal tissue through NeuroD1-based neuroregenerative gene therapy. (2020-11-16)

Promising MS drug may worsen disease, research suggests
The drug has not yet made it to human trials for multiple sclerosis, but scientists at the University of Virginia School of Medicine are urging their colleagues to move cautiously. (2020-11-13)

Exoskeleton-assisted walking improves mobility in individuals with spinal cord injury
''Participants showed improvement regardless of level of injury, completeness, or duration of injury,'' noted Dr. Forrest, ''indicating that exoskeletons can be used to improve mobility across a broad spectrum of individuals with neurological deficits caused by spinal cord injury. Our results can be used to guide the application of exoskeletons to spinal cord injury rehabilitation, and the timely acquisition of skills for the safe use of these devices for rehabilitation and community use.'' (2020-11-12)

University of Pittsburgh neuroscientists advance understanding of pain from light touch
Researchers from the Pittsburgh Center for Pain Research uncovered additional complexities behind mechanical allodynia - the sensation of pain from innocuous stimuli, such as light touch. (2020-11-11)

Penn researchers develop approach to prevent toxicity tied to neurological gene therapy
Penn Medicine researchers have developed a new targeted approach to prevent a toxicity seen in the sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia after gene therapy to treat neurological disorders. It's an important hurdle to clear, as the field works toward more safe and effective gene therapies for patients with disorders like spinal muscular atrophy. (2020-11-11)

Technique to regenerate optic nerve offers hope for future glaucoma treatment
Scientists have used gene therapy to regenerate damaged nerve fibres in the eye, in a discovery that could aid the development of new treatments for glaucoma, one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. (2020-11-05)

Venous origin of brain blood-vessel malformations
In the condition known as cavernoma, lesions arise in a cluster of blood vessels in the brain, spinal cord or retina. Researchers from Uppsala University can now show, at molecular level, that these changes originate in vein cells. This new knowledge of the condition creates potential for developing better therapies for patients. The study has been published in the journal eLife. (2020-11-03)

Multiple sclerosis as the flip side of immune fitness
About half of the people with multiple sclerosis have the HLA-DR15 gene variant. A study led by the University of Zurich has now shown how this genetic predisposition contributes to the development of the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis in combination with environmental factors. The decisive factor is the shaping of a repertoire of immune cells which - although they are effective in fighting off pathogens such as Epstein-Barr virus - also attack brain tissue. (2020-10-22)

Enzyme biofactories to enhance cord blood transplants
Stem cell trafficking to the bone marrow is improved by enzyme manufactured in silkworms and yeast. (2020-10-22)

Tracer molecule may improve imaging tests for brain injury
Researchers have validated a new radiolabeled molecule that can be used with imaging tests to accurately detect and characterize brain injury. (2020-10-22)

Cord blood DNA can hold clues for early ASD diagnosis and intervention
Specific regions in cord blood DNA can help identify kids who might develop autism, according to a UC Davis MIND Institute study. The findings from the study may hold clues for early autism diagnosis and intervention. (2020-10-22)

Findings shed light on the ancient origins of speed control during movement
Movement in animals is complex. Little has been known about how spinal inhibitory interneurons work to silence other neurons and related muscle groups in coordination with the active muscle groups across changing speeds. Now a Northwestern University research team has discovered in a study of zebrafish that there is a very orderly relationship between when these critical inhibitory neurons are born, their participation in different speeds of movement and what part of a motor neuron they innervate. (2020-10-22)

Robotic trunk support trainer improves upper body control of children with cerebral palsy
Columbia Engineering researchers report their innovative robotic Trunk Support Trainer, when combined with active practice of postural movements, improves trunk and reaching control in CP children with impaired sitting control. TruST helps physical therapists to not only support the children in the region of the trunk where they suffer from weakness and incoordination but also challenge them to perform rehabilitation tasks outside their base of support to improve their movement and coordination. (2020-10-22)

Ketamine, a painkiller used by the army, does not impair tolerance to blood loss
A low dose of ketamine, administered intravenously, does not alter a healthy human's tolerance to blood loss. In other words, if someone was given ketamine to kill pain associated with a battlefield injury, they would be able to tolerate blood loss just as well as someone who did not received this pain killer. (2020-10-21)

New evidence to guide the practice of blood transfusions in children with severe malari
Blood transfusions increase the survival of children admitted to the hospital with complications by severe malaria, and could be beneficial even at higher haemoglobin levels than those currently recommended. These are the main findings of a study led by ISGlobal, a centre supported by ''la Caixa'' Foundation, and published in The Lancet Haematology. (2020-10-19)

Wearable pressure-sensitive devices for medical use
Novel design and strategic use of materials in a pressure-sensitive adhesive strip. (2020-10-17)

Research could change how blood pressure is managed in spinal cord injury patients
New research from the International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries (ICORD) challenges the current standard for managing blood pressure in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). (2020-10-15)

Studies offer new evidence for possible link between blood type & COVID-19 susceptibility
Two studies published today in Blood Advances suggest people with blood type O may have a lower risk of COVID-19 infection and reduced likelihood of severe outcomes, including organ complications, if they do get sick. (2020-10-14)

Blood tests could be developed to help predict pregnancy complications new study suggests
UCLA researchers say a blood test commonly used to detect fetal genetic abnormalities may help predict complications associated with pregnancy before symptoms develop. Their preliminary study, appearing in Epigenetics, links certain cell-free DNA signatures to adverse outcomes in pregnancy, including ischemic placental disease and gestational diabetes. (2020-10-13)

Primates aren't quite frogs
Researchers in Japan demonstrated for the first time the 'spinal motor module hypothesis' in the primate arm, wherein the brain recruits interneuronal modules in the spinal cord rather than individual muscles to create movement and different modules can be combined to create specific movements. (2020-10-12)

Scientists discover mosquitoes' unique blood-taste detectors
Scientists aren't sure how mosquitoes sense taste of blood, or how they know that this, of all things, is something to gorge on. Nothing else, not even sweet nectar, makes them pump as ferociously as when they're draining our veins. New research identifies a unique group of neurons that don't care about simple tastes like sweet or salty. Rather, they activate only when sugar, salt, and other components of blood are all present at once. (2020-10-12)

New therapy improves treatment for multiple sclerosis
A new therapy that binds a cytokine to a blood protein shows potential in treating multiple sclerosis, and may even prevent it. (2020-10-12)

A diet high in prunes prevents bone loss associated with spinal cord injuries
Findings from a new study among mice show a diet high in dried plum (prunes) completely prevents bone loss associated with spinal cord injury (SCI), while also restoring some of the bone lost following SCI. (2020-10-06)

Effects of acute and chronic graft-versus-myelodysplastic syndrome on long-term outcomes following a
A research group led by Assistant Professor Takaaki Konuma in the Department of Hematology/Oncology, the Hospital of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo (IMSUT Hospital) has demonstrated a graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect of a previously unknown/novel allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in MDS patients. In addition, they succeeded in identifying a category of patients for whom the GVT effect was identified. (2020-10-06)

Exposure to vitamin D in the womb might minimize risk of high blood pressure for children born to mothers with preeclampsia
Children appear to be at greater risk of having high blood pressure when their mothers had the high blood pressure condition called preeclampsia during pregnancy--but this adverse association may be reduced or even eliminated for children who were exposed to higher levels of vitamin D in the womb. (2020-10-05)

High blood pressure linked to baroreflex in rats
Researchers describe a newly observed phenomenon in the way blood pressure is maintained in certain rats. (2020-10-03)

Latent lineage potential in neural stem cells enables spinal cord repair in mice
Spinal stem cells in mice can be reprogrammed to generate protective oligodendrocytes after spinal cord injury, enhancing neural repair, according to a new study. (2020-10-01)

Stem cells can help repair spinal cord after injury
Spinal cord injury often leads to permanent functional impairment. In a new study published in the journal Science researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden show that it is possible to stimulate stem cells in the mouse spinal cord to form large amounts of new oligodendrocytes, cells that are essential to the ability of neurons to transmit signals, and thus to help repair the spinal cord after injury. (2020-10-01)

UM171 saves another life
Developed in Canada, the UM171 molecule was used in a blood transplant by a Montreal medical team on a young man suffering from severe aplastic anemia, an autoimmune disease. (2020-09-30)

Urgent need for blood-based biomarkers to diagnosis concussion
There is an urgent need for objective markers for diagnosing concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury. The status of blood-based biomarker development and point-of-care testing are examined in a new Expert Panel Discussion. (2020-09-30)

Researchers create artificial lung to support pre-term babies in distress
An international team led by current and former McMaster University researchers has developed an artificial lung to support pre-term and other newborn babies in respiratory distress. (2020-09-29)

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