Current Coronavirus COVID-19 News and Events

Current Coronavirus COVID-19 News and Events, Coronavirus COVID-19 News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Researchers reveal genetic predisposition to severe COVID-19
HSE University researchers have become the first in the world to discover genetic predisposition to severe COVID-19. The results of the study were published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology. http://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2021.641900 (2021-02-23)

Tool encoded in coronaviruses provides a potential target for COVID-19
Coronaviruses exploit our cells so they can make copies of themselves inside us. (2021-02-23)

How reducing body temperature could help a tenth of all ICU patients
ROCKVILLE, MD - A tenth of all intensive care unit patients worldwide, and many critical patients with COVID-19, have acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). (2021-02-23)

More than 87,000 scientific papers on coronavirus since pandemic
Scientists from around the world have published more than 87,000 papers about coronavirus between the start of the COVID-19 pandemic and October 2020, a new analysis shows. Even given the importance of the pandemic, researchers were surprised by the huge number of studies and other papers that scientists produced on the subject in such a short time. (2021-02-23)

Alzheimer Europe sets out recommendations to improve data sharing in dementia research
At an online European Parliament workshop hosted by Deirdre Clune MEP (Ireland), Alzheimer Europe launched a new report ''Data Sharing in Dementia Research'', which reviews recent changes in EU research policy and sets out recommendations to improve data sharing in dementia research. (2021-02-23)

CDDEP report highlights tremendous burden from infectious diseases in SEAR countries
Washington, DC / New Delhi, India - Researchers at CDDEP, in collaboration with leading experts in the field, have produced the ''Infectious Diseases in the South-East Asia Region'' report, which examines cross-boundary challenges in communicable disease control in countries in the South-and South-East Asia region. The report emphasizes infectious diseases related to other sources of disease burden in the region and communicates overall trends in the health and economic burden they impose. (2021-02-23)

Innate immune system worsens the situation in severe COVID-19
In patients with severe COVID-19, the innate immune system overreacts. This overreaction may underlie the formation of blood clots (thrombi) and deterioration in oxygen saturation that affect the patients. This is shown in an Uppsala University study published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology. (2021-02-23)

B cells continue to work against SARS-CoV-2 months after infection, but do not recognize mutant
A new analysis of B cells and more than 1,000 different monoclonal antibodies from 8 patients with COVID-19 shows that, contrary to previous hypotheses, protective B cell responses to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein remain stable and continue to evolve over a 5-month period, many months after the initial period of active viral replication. (2021-02-23)

Scientists identify potential contributor to hyper immune responses in patients with severe COVID-19
Researchers have pinpointed a helper T cell population in the lungs of patients with severe COVID-19 that may be central to the development of hyperinflammation, lung injury, and subsequent acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) during disease (2021-02-23)

University of Minnesota researchers develop two new rapid COVID-19 diagnostic tests
University of Minnesota Medical School researchers have developed two new rapid diagnostic tests for COVID-19 - one to detect COVID-19 variants and one to help differentiate with other illnesses that have COVID-19-like symptoms. (2021-02-23)

LSU Health New Orleans study finds disadvantaged census tracts linked to COVID incidence
An LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health study reports a positive association between social vulnerability and COVID-19 incidence at the census tract level and recommends that more resources be allocated to socially vulnerable populations to reduce the incidence of COVID-19. (2021-02-23)

College students displaced from campus due to COVID-19 show worse psychological outcomes
In a new study of 791 undergraduate and graduate students, surveyed between April 9 and August 4, 2020, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston University's School of Social Work, and McLean Hospital revealed that students forced to relocate during the spring were more likely to report COVID-19-related grief, loneliness and generalized anxiety symptoms than students who did not relocate. (2021-02-23)

Study finds COVID risk communication targeting younger adults may have biggest impact
A study of adults in the United States finds that - broadly speaking - the older you are, the more concerned you are about COVID-19, and the more steps you take to reduce your risk from COVID-19. The study suggests that the biggest boost in risk reduction would stem from communication efforts aimed at raising awareness of COVID-19 risks among U.S. adults under the age of 40. (2021-02-23)

Monoclonal antibodies against MERS coronavirus show promise in phase 1 NIH-sponsored trial
A randomized, placebo-controlled Phase 1 clinical trial of two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against the coronavirus that causes MERS found that they were well tolerated and generally safe when administered simultaneously to healthy adults. The experimental mAbs target the MERS coronavirus (MERS CoV) spike protein used by the virus to attach to and infect target cells. The mAbs were discovered and developed by scientists at the biopharmaceutical company Regeneron. The trial was sponsored by NIAID. (2021-02-23)

Stress was leading reason teachers quit before pandemic, and COVID has made matters worse
Stress was the most common reason teachers cited for leaving the profession before and during the pandemic, according to a RAND Corporation survey of nearly 1,000 former public-school teachers. Three of four former teachers said work was often or always stressful in the most recent year in which they taught in a public school. Teachers cited stress nearly twice as often as insufficient pay as a reason for quitting. (2021-02-22)

New model helping identify pregnant women whose previous kidney injury puts them, babies at risk
Young pregnant women, who appear to have fully recovered from an acute injury that reduced their kidney function, have higher rates of significant problems like preeclampsia and low birthweight babies, problems which indicate their kidneys have not actually fully recovered. MCG scientists have developed a rodent model that is enabling studies to better understand, identify and ideally avoid this recently identified association. (2021-02-22)

Absence of natural killer cell receptor associated with severe Covid-19
The course and severity of COVID-19 in individual patients is largely influenced by the interaction between the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus and the human immune system. The NKG2C receptor communicates with an infected cell via one of its specialised surface structures, HLA-E, which results in the destruction of virus-infected cells. However, due to a genetic variation, approximately 4% of the population naturally lack the this receptor NKG2C, and in 30% of the population this receptor is only partially available. (2021-02-22)

Lonely adolescents are susceptible to internet addiction
Loneliness is a risk factor associated with adolescents being drawn into compulsive internet use. The risk of compulsive use has grown in the coronavirus pandemic: loneliness has become increasingly prevalent among adolescents, who spend longer and longer periods of time online. (2021-02-22)

Material hardship taking a mental and physical toll on young adults during pandemic
Material hardship, such as not being able to pay bills, negatively affects both physical and mental health. This research brief examines how different types of material hardship (difficulty paying for food, bills, and health care) are associated with self-rated health, depression, sleep problems, and suicidal thoughts among U.S. young adults (ages 24-32). (2021-02-22)

UConn researcher offers lessons learned from a pre-pandemic study of telemedicine use
With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine has become a new norm for many routine and non-emergency medical needs. But there are lessons to be learned from telemedicine's use - or lack thereof - prior to the pandemic, and a new study from a UConn School of Social Work researcher offers insight for policymakers, administrators, and public health officials when considering the implementation of new services. (2021-02-22)

What is COVID-19's impact on Black and Latino persons living with HIV?
Study looks at COVID-19 effects on engagement in HIV care, HIV medication use, and overall well-being among low-income Black and Latino individuals who have lived with HIV for many years. (2021-02-22)

Association of timing of school closings, behavioral changes with evolution of COVID-19 pandemic in US
Using COVID-19 data, this observational study looked at what are the independent associations of voluntary behavioral change and legal restrictions, such as state-mandated school closings, with the subsequent spread of the COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S. (2021-02-22)

Parents of children with cancer have additional worries during COVID
The COVID-19 pandemic has heaped additional financial strains, childcare complications and other problems on already-burdened caregivers of children diagnosed with cancer, according to a study from researchers at Duke Health and other institutions. (2021-02-22)

Tricking the novel coronavirus with a fake "handshake"
Fool the novel coronavirus once and it can't cause infection of cells, new research suggests. Scientists have developed protein fragments, called peptides, that bind to the virus's Spike protein, effectively tricking SARS-CoV-2 into ''shaking hands'' with a replica rather than with the receptor that lets the virus into a cell. (2021-02-22)

Toddler sleep patterns matter
Lauren Covington, an assistant professor in the University of Delaware School of Nursing, found that children with inconsistent sleep schedules have higher body mass index (BMI) percentiles. Her research also found that children from households with greater poverty had more overall inconsistent sleep onset times. But for families living in poverty, consistent bedtime scheduling may not be easily done, especially if a caregiver is the only parent, juggling multiple jobs, parenting multiple children or dealing with a tenuous housing situation. (2021-02-22)

Oncotarget: MEK inhibitors relevant to SARS-CoV-2 infection
The @Oncotarget authors show a drug class-effect with MEKi to stimulate NK cells, inhibit inflammatory cytokines and block host-factors for SARS-CoV-2 infection leading also to suppression of SARS-CoV-2-S pseudovirus infection of human cells (2021-02-22)

West Virginia's enduring, intertwined epidemics: Opioids and HIV
In a paper for The Lancet, West Virginia University Drs. Sally Hodder and Judith Feinberg state that the opioid and HIV epidemics are intertwined in West Virginia, and therefore should be treated together. (2021-02-22)

BIDMC researchers develop model to estimate false-negative rate for COVID-19 tests
A team of researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) has developed a mathematical means of assessing tests' false-negative rate. (2021-02-22)

International study finds increased COVID-19 mortality among adults with Down syndrome
A new study by an international team of researchers found that adults with Down syndrome are more likely to die from COVID-19 than the general population, supporting the need to prioritize vaccinating people with the genetic disorder. (2021-02-22)

Texas A&M-UTMB team identifies potential drug to treat SARS-CoV-2
A federally approved heart medication shows significant effectiveness in interfering with SARS-CoV-2 entry into the human cell host, according to a new study by a research team from Texas A&M University and The University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB). (2021-02-22)

Researchers learn that pregnant women pass along protective COVID antibodies to their babies
Antibodies that guard against COVID-19 can transfer from mothers to babies while in the womb, according to a new study from Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian researchers published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. (2021-02-22)

COVID-19 infection in pregnancy not linked with still birth or baby death
COVID-19 infection in pregnancy is not associated with stillbirth or early neonatal death, according to a new study. (2021-02-22)

Investment needed to bring down pancreatic cancer death rates in Europe
Researchers have called on European policymakers to make adequate resources available to tackle pancreatic cancer, a disease that is almost invariably fatal and where little progress has been made over the past 40 years. The latest predictions for cancer deaths in the EU and UK for 2021, published in the leading cancer journal Annals of Oncology, show that pancreatic death rates are predicted to remain approximately stable for men, but continue to rise in women in most EU countries. (2021-02-21)

Ten lessons from the virus crisis
A mixture of smaller countries led by New Zealand, Vietnam, Taiwan, Thailand, Cyprus, Rwanda and Iceland led the world 's Top 10 countries to manage their COVID-19 response well, according to a new study. In the study, published in The BMJ, lead researcher Flinders University's Professor Fran Baum joined experts from around the world to reflect upon the Global Health Security Index (October 2019) predictions for a public health emergency. (2021-02-21)

Covid-19: Future targets for treatments rapidly identified with new computer simulations
Researchers have detailed a mechanism in the distinctive corona of Covid-19 that could help scientists to rapidly find new treatments for the virus, and quickly test whether existing treatments are likely to work with mutated versions as they develop. (2021-02-19)

New study highlights lack of diversity and inclusion in vaccine clinical trials
A team of scientific experts from across the U.S. and Puerto Rico are advocating for increased diversity in vaccine trials after publishing a new report that highlights a decade's worth of disparities. (2021-02-19)

COVID-19 may have caused the loss of more than 20.5 million years of life worldwide
A study by a group researchers from several international universities and research centres, including lecturers from the UPF Department of Economics and Business, has estimated the premature mortality impact of covid-19. It has done so by calculating years of life lost (YLL) due to covid-19 compared to YLL for other common illnesses, such as the flu or cardiovascular diseases. (2021-02-19)

Data show lower daily temperatures lead to higher transmission of COVID-19
Understanding the impact of seasonal temperature changes on transmission of SARS-CoV-2 is an important factor in reducing the virus's spread in the years to come. Researchers compared daily low temperature data and logged cases of COVID-19 in 50 countries in the Northern Hemisphere between Jan. 22 and April 6, 2020. Their research, published this week in PLOS ONE, showed that as temperatures rose, the rate of new cases of COVID-19 decreased. (2021-02-19)

Combined vaccination and physical distancing enough to prevent future COVID-19 surges
A combination of robust vaccination programmes and strict physical distancing could avoid recurring peaks of COVID-19 without the need for stay-at-home restrictions, according to a new study by epidemiologists and demographers from WorldPop at the University of Southampton and The Chinese University of Hong Kong. Using anonymised mobile phone geolocation data with epidemiological and coronavirus case data from China, the team predicted the effect of combinations of interventions on low, medium and high density cities. (2021-02-19)

The Lancet: 3-month interval between first and second dose of Oxford COVID-19 vaccine results in higher vaccine efficacy than 6-week interval
* Exploratory analyses including 17,178 participants find that higher vaccine efficacy is obtained with a longer interval between the first and second standard dose (81% for 3-month interval vs 55% for up to 6-week interval). In addition, a single dose of vaccine is highly efficacious in the first 3 months (76% efficacy from 22 days after vaccination onwards). (2021-02-19)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.