Current Corrosion News and Events

Current Corrosion News and Events, Corrosion News Articles.
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A salt solution for desalinating brine
Solar-powered brine crystallization could alleviate the environmental impacts of seawater desalination. (2021-02-21)

Solar hydrogen: Photoanodes made of alpha-SnWO4 promise high efficiencies
Photoanodes made of metal oxides are considered to be a viable solution for the production of hydrogen with sunlight. Alpha-SnWO4 has optimal electronic properties for photoelectrochemical water splitting with sunlight, but corrodes easily. Protective layers of nickel oxide prevent corrosion, but reduce the photovoltage and limit the efficiency. Now a team at HZB has investigated at BESSY II what happens at the interface between the photoanode and the protective layer. (2021-01-26)

Giving the hydrogen economy an acid test
Tsukuba University scientists show that the effectiveness of hydrogen-producing metal catalysts protected by graphene depends on the ability of protons to penetrate into the inner metallic surface. This work may lead to widely available hydrogen-powered cars. (2021-01-14)

Scientists suggested a method to improve performance of methanol fuel cells
Fuel cells based on methanol oxidation have a huge potential in the motor and technical industries. To increase their energy performance, scientists suggest using electrodes made of thin palladium-based metallic glass films. A group of researchers from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Austria, Turkey, Switzerland, and the UK has developed a new metallic glass for this application. The results were reported in the Nanoscale journal. (2020-12-22)

The latest magnesium studies pave the way for new biomedical materials
Materials used in biomedicine must be characterized by controlled biodegradability, sufficient strength and total absence of toxicity to the human body. The search for such materials is, therefore, not a simple task. In this context, scientists have been interested in magnesium for a long time. Recently, using such techniques as positron annihilation spectroscopy, the researchers were able to demonstrate that magnesium subjected to surface mechanical attrition treatment obtains the properties necessary for a biocompatible material. (2020-12-17)

Novel cathode design significantly improves performance of next-generation battery
A research team at HKUST has proposed a novel cathode design concept for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery that substantially improves the performance of this kind of promising next-generation battery. (2020-12-11)

Researchers find a better way to design metal alloys
A system developed by MIT researchers uses machine learning to analyze boundaries between crystal grains, allowing for the selection of desired properties in a new metal alloy. (2020-12-11)

Common pipe alloy can form cancer-causing chemical in drinking water
Rusted iron pipes can react with residual disinfectants in drinking water distribution systems to produce carcinogenic hexavalent chromium in drinking water, reports a study by engineers at UC Riverside. (2020-12-03)

RUDN University chemists developed cheap and eco-friendly surfactants
An international team including chemists from RUDN University suggested an economically feasible and environmentally friendly method to synthesize surfactants. The new compounds can become an eco-friendly alternative to traditional chemicals used in oil production, skincare products manufacture, and in the pharmaceutical industry to transport drugs to diseased body tissues. (2020-11-12)

Solar hydrogen: let's consider the stability of photoelectrodes
As part of an international collaboration, a team at the HZB has examined the corrosion processes of high-quality BiVO4 photoelectrodes using different state-of-the-art characterisation methods. The result is the first operando stability study of high-purity BiVO4 photoanodes during the photoelectrochemical oxygen evolution reaction (OER). This work shows how the stability of photoelectrodes and catalysts can be compared and enhanced in the future. (2020-10-26)

Scientists from NUST MISIS manage to improve metallic glasses
Researchers at National University of Science and Technology MISIS (NUST MISIS) have managed to develop a unique method to process bulk metallic glasses. According to the authors of the study, they have managed to find processing conditions that significantly improve the quality of this promising material. The research results were published in Journal of Alloys and Compounds. (2020-10-23)

Monash engineers improve fatigue life of high strength aluminium alloys by 25 times
A world-first study by Monash University engineers has demonstrated improvements in the fatigue life of high strength aluminium alloys by 25 times -- a significant outcome for the transport manufacturing industry. (2020-10-15)

Climate change undermines the safety of buildings and infrastructure in Europe
The higher temperatures expected over the next 50 years in Europe will accelerate corrosion of buildings, and will expose infrastructure to higher stresses, thus undermining the safety of constructions. CMCC researchers and members of the scientific network established by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission, co-authored two studies, suggesting a review of the EU standards for structural design. (2020-10-14)

Story Tips: Remote population counting, slowing corrosion and turning down the heat
ORNL Story tips: Remote population counting, slowing corrosion and turning down the heat (2020-10-06)

Cement-free concrete beats corrosion and gives fatbergs the flush
Researchers from RMIT University have developed an eco-friendly zero-cement concrete, which all but eliminates corrosion. (2020-09-28)

A better informed society can prevent lead poisoning disasters
In a paper published Sept. 8 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, John R. Scully and Raymond J. Santucci address unresolved scientific questions that can help avert future lead poisoning disasters. A better-informed society can prevent such disasters from happening through improved risk assessment, anticipation and management of factors affecting lead release. (2020-09-18)

A chemist from RUDN developed a new type of one-molecule thick water-repellent film
A chemist from RUDN University together with colleagues created a new type of two-dimensional nanofilm from an organic material called calixarene. The invention can be used as a protective coating in electronics and as a part of molecular filters. They also suggested a way of increasing the durability of such films with UV radiation (2020-09-09)

Development of next-generation zinc ion battery without the risk of explosion or fire
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) has announced that a research team of the Center for Energy Storage Research had developed a next-generation secondary battery that uses zinc metal as an electrode without any risk of explosion or fire. This battery is safe enough to be worn on the body and can be manufactured in the form of fiber shape, which means it may potentially be applied as a power source for wearable devices in the future. (2020-09-02)

Photo catalysts show promise in creating self-cleaning surfaces and disinfecting agents
The team produced and studied new active photocatalysts based on natural aluminosilicate nanotubes with cadmium sulfide quantum dots stabilized on their surface synthesized by self-assembly. (2020-09-02)

How dangerous are burning electric cars?
What happens if an electric car burns in a road tunnel or an underground car park? In the Hagerbach test tunnel in Switzerland, Empa researchers and tunnel safety expert Lars Derek Mellert set fire to battery cells of electric cars, analyzed the distribution of soot and smoke gases and the chemical residues in the extinguishing water. (2020-09-01)

Sunflower oil shows unexpected efficiency in corrosion prevention
Sunflower oil, which is found in almost every home, can be used not only in cooking, everyday life and cosmetology - it will help avoid complications (gas hydrates and corrosion) during oil and gas production. Scientists of the priority area of Kazan University intend to apply inhibitors developed on its basis in harsh Arctic conditions. (2020-08-28)

Microbial ecology yields new insights for future shipwreck conservation
Researchers find distinct differences in the composition of microbial communities on and around the 1960s Pappy Lane shipwreck in Pamlico Sound, North Carolina, suggesting niche partitioning based on biotic and abiotic conditions. The study also identified a new strain of iron-oxidizing bacteria that may contribute to biocorrosion. These results will be useful for the conservation of coastal shallow water shipwrecks. (2020-08-19)

Long-term risks of joint implants
Using highly complex analytical techniques, a group of researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin were able to observe in detail how different metals are released from joint implants and accumulate in the surrounding bone tissue. Findings showed a steady release of metals from various implant components. In contrast to previous assumptions, this was not related to the degree of mechanical stress involved. (2020-08-11)

POSTECH solves the durability issue of hydrogen cars
Professor Yong-Tae Kim's research team improves the durability of automotive fuel cells through selective electro-catalysis. (2020-07-13)

Developing better fabrication techniques for pH-responsive microcapsules
Researchers have developed a new method to create microcapsules, which are tiny droplets surrounded by a solid shell. The technique can be used to make microcapsules that respond to changes in pH, which are useful for applications such as anti-corrosion coatings. (2020-06-09)

Machine-learning tool could help develop tougher materials
Engineers develop a rapid screening system to test fracture resistance in billions of potential materials. (2020-05-20)

X-ray analysis sheds light on construction and conservation of artefacts from Henry VIII's warship
21st century X-ray technology has allowed University of Warwick scientists to peer back through time at the production of the armour worn by the crew of Henry VIII's favoured warship, the Mary Rose. (2020-04-28)

Highly concentrated aqueous electrolytes could replace solvents used in batteries
The review article by researchers at the University of São Paulo shows the advantages of this technological alternative, which is nontoxic and much cheaper than other methods. (2020-04-24)

Future Army vehicles could see an improvement in structural materials
Materials used for a Soldier's personal protection gear may be tough enough for vehicles too, according to a new Army study. (2020-04-13)

Using fiber optics to advance safe and renewable energy
Fiber optic cables, it turns out, can be incredibly useful scientific sensors. Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have studied them for use in carbon sequestration, groundwater mapping, earthquake detection, and monitoring of Arctic permafrost thaw. Now they have been awarded new grants to develop fiber optics for two novel uses: monitoring offshore wind operations and underground natural gas storage. (2020-03-30)

Waterborne polyurea/urethanes significantly reduce hydrate growth rate in pipelines
A series of inhibitors has appeared with new reagents based on water-soluble polyurethanes. (2020-03-20)

A tale of shepherds and helices
A salt formed due to corrosion on a restored artwork features a structure that is known from the world of biology. (2020-03-16)

Sulfonated chitosan studied as potential biodegradable corrosion inhibitor
Hydrate formation has long been a problem for hydrocarbon production in the Arctic. Kazan Federal University's EcoOil research unit works on inhibitors to help mitigate the problem (2020-03-04)

Does graphene cause or prevent the corrosion of copper? New study finally settles the debate
Graphene has attracted the interest of researchers in recent years because, despite its apparent anti-corrosive properties, its proximity was seen to increase the corrosion of copper. A research team from Chung-Ang University used Raman spectroscopy to analyze graphene's properties over a long period and found that the corroded surface of copper forms a hybrid layer with graphene, which prevents further corrosion. These findings could have potential applications in extending the life of copper--a common component of various electronic devices. (2020-02-14)

Bats inspire detectors to help prevent oil and gas pipe leaks
Engineers have developed a new scanning technique inspired by the natural world that can detect corroding metals in oil and gas pipelines. By mimicking how bats use differing wavelengths of ultrasound to detect objects, hunt, and avoid predators, engineers have developed a new system that combines two separate types of radiation, fast neutrons and gamma rays, to detect corrosion -- a major cause of pipeline leaks. (2020-01-30)

New research could aid cleaner energy technologies
New research led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, could aid cleaner energy technologies. (2020-01-30)

Hybrid technique to produce stronger nickel for auto, medical, manufacturing
Purdue University innovators have created a hybrid technique to fabricate a new form of nickel that may help the future production of lifesaving medical devices, high-tech devices and vehicles with strong corrosion-resistant protection. (2020-01-29)

Instant hydrogen production for powering fuel cells
Researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing and Tsinghua University, Beijing investigate real-time, on-demand hydrogen generation for use in fuel cells, which are a quiet and clean form of energy. (2020-01-28)

Current model for storing nuclear waste is incomplete
The materials the United States and other countries plan to use to store high level nuclear waste will likely degrade faster than anyone previously knew, because of the way those materials interact, new research shows. The findings, published today in the journal Nature Materials, show that corrosion of nuclear waste storage materials accelerates because of changes in the chemistry of the nuclear waste solution, and because of the way the materials interact with one another. (2020-01-27)

Ocean acidification is damaging shark scales
Sharks have unusual type of scales referred to as 'denticles.' A research group from South Africa and Germany that includes Jacqueline Dziergwa and Professor Dr. Christopher Bridges from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) has examined the impact of climate change in the form of ocean acidification on these structures. The researchers uncovered damage to the denticles and have reported on their findings in the journal Scientific Reports. (2020-01-08)

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