Current Corruption News and Events

Current Corruption News and Events, Corruption News Articles.
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Does Goal 7 Energy for All need a rethink?
Goal 7 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aims to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all by 2030. Yet according to new research by Copenhagen Business School the poor planning and execution of decarbonisation strategies in emerging markets challenges the aims of Goal 7. (2021-02-08)

Natural resources governance -- responsibilization of citizens or forcing responsibility on them?
The possibilities of citizens to participate in natural resource governance are increasing. Responsive and collaborative models of natural resource governance can open up new opportunities, but can also lead to unreasonable responsibilization, or even force responsibility on under-resourced organizations and individuals. (2020-11-30)

Politicians and governments are suppressing science, argues The BMJ
Politicians and governments are suppressing science, and when good science is suppressed, people die, argues a senior editor at The BMJ today. (2020-11-13)

Malice leaves a nasty smell
Unhealthy behaviours trigger moral judgments that are similar to the basic emotions that contribute to our ability to survive. Two different hypotheses are to be found in the current scientific literature as to the identity of these emotions. After developing a new approach to brain imaging, a research team from the University of Geneva shows that unhealthy behaviours trigger brain responses that are similar to those prompted by bad smells. (2020-10-16)

Clean and clear: How being more transparent over resources helps cut carbon emissions
Countries that sign up to improved financial transparency over oil, gas, and mining revenues benefit from significant reductions in carbon emissions, a new study by the University of Sussex Business School reveals. (2020-10-14)

New research explores how multinational firms can manage corruption
New research from Charles E. Stevens, associate professor of management in Lehigh's College of Business, shows multinational firms taking a new approach when dealing with corruption. Instead of engaging in corrupt activities or avoiding investments in countries where corruption is widespread, firms are managing corruption by promoting positive engagement with the host country. (2020-10-01)

The secretive networks used to move money offshore
The researchers at USC have made some discoveries about the network behind the Panama Papers, uncovering uniquely fragmented network behavior and transactions. This is vastly different from more traditional social or organizational networks, demonstrating why these systems of transactions and associations are so robust and difficult to infiltrate or take down (2020-09-29)

Privatized prisons lead to more inmates, longer sentences, study finds
WSU study finds that when states turn to private prisons, the number of criminals incarcerated rises and the length of sentences increases. Private prisons lead to an average increase of 178 new prisoners per million population per year. At an average cost of $60 per day per prisoner, that costs states between $1.9 to $10.6 million per year, if all those additional prisoners are in private prisons. (2020-09-14)

All that glitters is not gold: Misuse of AI by big tech can harm developing countries
The debate on the risks and benefits of Artificial Intelligence (AI) is still ongoing, but one thing is certain: without appropriate regulatory measures, AI is potentially dangerous. A recent study explores how AI can be a threat to the society, especially developing nations, if left unregulated. The study also talks about why AI should comply with the Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations, to ensure that it benefits the society as a whole. (2020-08-27)

Novel technology extends battery life, increases upload speed, and reduces data corruption
Researchers from the University of Southern California have created a memory device with improved material and structure and which promises to increase data upload speed, extend smartphone battery life, and reduce data corruption. (2020-07-22)

Could your computer please be more polite? Thank you
In a tense time when a pandemic rages, politicians wrangle for votes and protesters demand racial justice, a little politeness and courtesy go a long way. Now researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed an automated method for making communications more polite. Specifically, the method takes nonpolite directives or requests -- those that use either impolite or neutral language -- and restructures them or adds words to make them more well-mannered. (2020-06-30)

Examining media coverage of protests worldwide
As anti-racism solidarity protests continue around the world, new research suggests mainstream media have a tendency to focus on the violence and spectacle of a protest rather than the substance. That mentality and approach need to change according to Summer Harlow, assistant professor of journalism at the University of Houston Jack J. Valenti School of Communication. (2020-06-24)

Why relying on new technology won't save the planet
Why relying on new technology won't save the planet Overreliance on promises of new technology to solve climate change is enabling delay, say researchers from Lancaster University. Their research in Nature Climate Change calls for an end to a longstanding cycle of technological promises and reframed climate change targets. They argue instead for cultural, social and political transformation to enable widespread deployment of both behavioural and technological responses to climate change. (2020-04-20)

Mismanagment, not tampering, at root of supply problems for Ugandan farmers
For years, speculation about the poor quality of vital agricultural supplies in the African nation of Uganda has focused on questions of deliberate tampering with products -- adding rocks to bags of seed in order to charge more money for the heavier product, for instance. But in a recent publication, two UConn researchers found no evidence of deliberate adulteration -- but plenty of proof that mismanagement and inadequate infrastructure pose a significant problem for Ugandan farmers. (2020-04-17)

Corporate social irresponsibility: Which cases are critically reported -- and which aren't?
A new study on media reports about corporate misconduct in five countries shows that reporting or no reporting often depends on interests of the media companies. (2020-03-12)

UTSA examines reporters' portrayal of US border under Trump
The southern US border has been portrayed as a bogeyman not only by the Trump administration but also surprisingly by major US news media. This is the latest finding according to an analysis of news reporting conducted at The University of Texas at San Antonio. (2020-02-12)

Beyond Goodfellas and The Godfather: the Cosa Nostra families' rise and fall
Since 1979 the Crime and Justice series has presented a review of the latest international research, providing expertise to enhance the work of sociologists, psychologists, criminal lawyers, justice scholars, and political scientists. The series explores a full range of issues concerning crime, its causes, and its cures. In both the review and the thematic volumes, Crime and Justice offers an interdisciplinary approach to address core issues in criminology. (2020-02-06)

Researchers foresee the ongoing use of cash
Are the countries of the Eurozone ready to drop cash in hand? In light of a study of the UPV and UV, the answer is no. The work concludes that in these countries, there are still many years left of paying with cash. And, in Spain, this seems to be the case even more. These and other conclusions have recently been published in Cuadernos de Economía. (2020-01-28)

Global dissatisfaction with democracy at record high, new report reveals
2019 had the 'highest level of democratic discontent' since detailed global recording began in 1995. Many large democracies now at their highest-ever recorded level for democratic dissatisfaction, including the UK, US, Brazil, Mexico and Australia. (2020-01-28)

All Bitcoin mining should be environmentally friendly
The energy used to mine for cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin is on par with the energy consumed by Ireland. Naoki Shibata reports a new blockchain algorithm, proof-of-search, that redirects the wasted energy to solve for optimization problems in fields such as medicine, space, and finance, all while preserving the anonymity and democratization of cryptocurrencies. (2019-12-10)

Government integrity holds key to tackling corporate corruption -- study
Government leaders must set a good example to the business community if they want to eliminate corporate corruption, a new study reveals. (2019-11-20)

Study shows digital media has damaging impact on reintegration of 'white collar' criminals
Offenders convicted of occupational crime and corruption are having their rehabilitation negatively affected by long term 'labels' attached to them on digital media, according to new research by the University of Portsmouth. (2019-11-15)

When reporting climate-driven human migration, place matters
Location matters when talking about how climate might or might not be driving migration from Central America. Climate research in the dry corridor region revealed a complex pattern of change. If you average across the entire region you wouldn't see a trend going either way. (2019-11-13)

Overcoming weak governance will take decades with implications for climate adaptation
Governance in climate vulnerable countries will take decades to improve, substantially impeding the ability of nations to adapt to climate change and affecting billions of people globally, according to new research involving the University of East Anglia (UEA). (2019-10-28)

Improving governance is key for adaptive capacity
Governance in climate vulnerable countries will take decades to improve, substantially impeding the ability of nations to adapt to climate change and affecting billions of people globally, according to new research published in Nature Sustainability. (2019-10-28)

Catch-22 -- stricter border enforcement may increase agent corruption
Analysis of corruption cases among customs officers and Border Patrol agents reveals alarming trends depending on their years of service. (2019-10-02)

Corruption among India's factory inspectors makes labour regulation costly
New research shows that 'extortionary' corruption on the part of factory inspectors in India is helping to drive up the cost of the country's labour regulations to business. (2019-08-27)

Bribery linked with difficulty accessing healthcare in sub-Saharan Africa
In a large survey in sub-Saharan Africa, adults who said they had paid a bribe for healthcare in the past year were more than four times as likely to report difficulty in obtaining care than those who had not paid bribes. Amber Hsiao and colleagues at the Technical University of Berlin, Germany, report these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on Aug. 21, 2019. (2019-08-21)

The front line of environmental violence
Environmental defenders on the front line of natural resource conflict are being killed at an alarming rate, according to a University of Queensland study. According to UQ School of Biological Sciences researcher Dr Nathalie Butt, the 1558 deaths recorded between 2002 and 2017 were largely due to external demand for the very resources they were trying to protect. (2019-08-05)

Study: Even in competitive markets, shareholders bear burden of corruption
While the US traditionally ranks low on worldwide corruption indices, domestic political corruption still imposes substantial costs on US shareholders, according to new research co-written by Gies College of Business accounting professor Nerissa Brown. (2019-07-18)

Current pledges to phase out coal power are critically insufficient to slow climate change
The Powering Past Coal Alliance, or PPCA, is a coalition of 30 countries and 22 cities and states, that aims to phase out unabated coal power. But analysis led by Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shows that members mainly pledge to close older plants near the end of their lifetimes, resulting in limited emissions reductions. (2019-07-01)

Roads and deforestation explode in the Congo basin
Logging roads are expanding dramatically in the Congo Basin, leading to catastrophic collapses in animal populations living in the world's second-largest rainforest, according to research co-led by a scientist at James Cook University in Australia. (2019-06-24)

Moral concerns override desire to profit from finding a lost wallet
The setup of a research study was a bit like the popular ABC television program 'What Would You Do?' -- minus the television cameras and big reveal in the end. (2019-06-20)

Social media use contributing to poor mental health in Indonesia, research finds
Social media use is contributing to poor mental health in Indonesia, research presented in a paper by Sujarwoto Sujarwoto, Gindo Tampubolon and Adi Cilik Pierewan has found. (2019-06-17)

Why you may be prone to hiring a liar, and not even know it
Researchers find that people don't always disapprove of deception. In fact, they perceive the ability to deceive as an asset in occupations that are stereotyped as high in 'selling orientation.' (2019-06-11)

Exploring the causes of persistent corruption
IIASA researchers used a novel approach to explore the key processes and conditions that determine corruption levels. Their analysis shows that transparency about the integrity of institutions is key to fighting corruption, and that vigilance against corruption must be maintained despite its cost, even when corruption levels appear to be low. (2019-06-10)

Study offers comprehensive roadmap for regulating political activity by nonprofits
Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer's comprehensive approach yields surprising and controversial solutions, beginning with the creation of a simple and broad definition of political activity that charities will be prohibited from engaging in. (2019-06-05)

Africa's elephant poaching rates in decline, but iconic animal still under threat
Elephant poaching rates in Africa have started to decline after reaching a peak in 2011, an international team of scientists have concluded. (2019-05-28)

Factors associated with elephant poaching
Study associates illegal hunting rates in Africa with levels of poverty, corruption and ivory demand. (2019-05-28)

Brain activity of Spanish Popular Party voters triggered by rivals
Scientists from the University of Granada (UGR), the Distance Learning University of Madrid (UDIMA) and Temple University (United States) have analyzed the brain response of supporters of Spain's Popular Party (PP) and the Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) when exposed to information about corruption or positive news from the rival party (2019-05-16)

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