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Current Cotton News and Events, Cotton News Articles.
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Infection outbreaks at hospitals could be reduced by copper-coated uniforms
Doctors, nurses and healthcare professionals could soon be wearing uniforms brushed with tiny copper nanoparticles to reduce the spread of bacterial infections and viruses, such as Escherichia coli (E. coli), at hospitals. (2018-02-15)
NUS researchers turn fashion waste into multifunctional material
A research team led by Associate Professor Hai Minh Duong and Professor Nhan Phan-Thien from the Department of Mechanical Engineering at National University of Singapore's Faculty of Engineering has devised a fast, cheap and green method to convert fashion waste into highly compressible and ultralight cotton aerogels. (2018-02-12)
Scientists target glioma cancer stem cells, which could improve patient survival
Brain tumors are responsible for 25 percent of cancer-related deaths in children and young adults. (2018-02-05)
UTIA research examines long-term economic impact of cover crops
A team of researchers from the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture examined data from the past 29 years to determine whether it is profitable to include cover crops in an erosion management strategy. (2018-02-05)
New Eocene fossil data suggest climate models may underestimate future polar warming
A new international analysis of marine fossils shows that warming of the polar oceans during the Eocene, a greenhouse period that provides a glimpse of Earth's potential future climate, was greater than previously thought. (2018-01-22)
AgriLife Research study: Winter wheat feasible cover crop for Rolling Plains cotton
Interest in using cover crops to improve soil health continues to grow in the Texas Rolling Plains region, but the nagging concern of reductions in soil moisture and effects on yields of subsequent cash crops still exists. (2017-11-28)
Research shows drones could help crop management take off
Initial results of an ongoing study show that aerial imagery produced by multi-spectral sensors as well as less-expensive digital cameras may improve accuracy and efficiency of plant stand assessment in cotton. (2017-11-17)
Cool textiles to beat the heat
Air-conditioned buildings bring welcome relief to people coming in from the heat. (2017-11-08)
Circadian clock discovery could help boost water efficiency in food plants
A discovery by Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists in Dallas provides new insights about the biological or circadian clock, how it regulates high water-use efficiency in some plants, and how others, including food plants, might be improved for the same efficiency. (2017-11-07)
New SOFT e-textiles could offer advanced protection for soldiers and emergency personnel
New technology from Dartmouth College harnesses electronic signals in a smart fabric to detect, capture, concentrate and filter toxic chemicals. (2017-11-01)
Three new lung cancer genetic biomarkers are identified in Dartmouth study
SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) are variations in our DNA that determine our susceptibility to developing some diseases. (2017-10-26)
Global trade entrenches poverty traps
A theorem published this week suggests that greater engagement in the international exchange can actually reinforce productivity-impeding practices that keep countries in poverty. (2017-10-26)
Serrated polyps plus conventional adenomas may mean higher risk for colorectal cancer
Examining more than 5,000 reports from the New Hampshire Colonoscopy Registry, A Dartmouth research team finds that individuals with both conventional adenomas as well as a subset of lesions known as serrated polyps may be at higher risk for developing colorectal cancer or high-risk adenomas that can lead to colorectal cancer, than those who have serrated polyps or high-risk adenomas alone. (2017-10-11)
Pest resistance to biotech crops surging
Pest resistance to genetically engineered crops Bt crops is evolving faster now than before, UA researchers show in the most comprehensive study to date. (2017-10-10)
Electrically-heated textiles now possible via UMass Amherst research
Skiers, crossing guards and others who endure frozen fingers in cold weather may look forward to future relief as manufacturers are poised to take advantage of a new technique for creating electrically heated cloth developed by materials scientist Trisha Andrew and colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. (2017-09-28)
Secrets of bright, rapidly spinning star revealed
Almost 50 years after it was first predicted that rapidly rotating stars would emit polarized light, a UNSW Sydney-led team of scientists has succeeded in observing the phenomenon for the first time. (2017-09-18)
'Naturally' glowing cotton yields dazzling new threads
Cotton that's grown with molecules that endow appealing properties -- like fluorescence or magnetism -- may one day eliminate the need for applying chemical treatments to fabrics to achieve such qualities, a new study suggests. (2017-09-14)
Comparing cancer drug effectiveness from cells to mice to man
Dartmouth researchers who studied the cancer drug gemcitabine in cell culture, mouse models and humans have shown that the drug, at administered (tolerated) dose, arrests cell growth during cancer progression. (2017-09-06)
'Something wicked (smelling)' this way comes -- the science of fabrics and odors
Researchers from New Zealand's University of Otago have used advanced technology to find out why three common fiber types differ in how they take in and release body odor. (2017-09-04)
Energized fabrics could keep soldiers warm and battle-ready in frigid climates
Soldiering in arctic conditions is tough. Protective clothing can be heavy and can cause overheating and sweating, while hands and feet can grow numb. (2017-08-20)
City College researchers produce smart fabric to neutralize nerve gas
From the lab of City College of New York chemical engineer and Fulbright Scholar Teresa J. (2017-08-16)
Scientists unlock planthoppers' role in rice stripe virus reproduction
Recently, researchers from the Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have discovered how a severe rice virus reproduces inside the small brown planthopper, a major carrier of the virus, and have published this work in eLife. (2017-08-10)
Cracking the code of megapests
For the first time researchers have mapped the complete genome of two closely related megapests potentially saving the international agricultural community billions of dollars a year. (2017-08-02)
SA child living with HIV maintains remission without ARVs since 2008
A 9-year-old South African diagnosed with HIV at a month old who received antiretroviral treatment during infancy has suppressed the virus for almost 9 years. (2017-07-26)
Drug combination shows better tolerance and effectiveness in metastatic renal cell cancer
A novel combination of nivolumab plus ipilimumab for patients with metastatic kidney cancer is proving to be a more effective treatment with more durable tumor response than the two immunotherapies used separately. (2017-07-26)
Molecular changes with age in normal breast tissue are linked to cancer-related changes
New research provides insight into how changes that occur with age may predispose breast tissue cells to becoming cancerous. (2017-07-20)
Shooting the achilles heel of nervous system cancers
A cooperative research team led by researchers at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center devised a strategy to target cancer cells while sparing normal cells by capitalizing on vulnerabilities that are exposed only in tumor cells. (2017-07-20)
Climate change to deplete some US water basins used for irrigation
A new study by MIT climate scientists, economists, and agriculture experts finds that certain hotspots in the country will experience severe reductions in crop yields by 2050, due to climate change's impact on irrigation. (2017-07-12)
E-cigarettes increase risk of cigarette smoking in youth
A new collaborative Dartmouth study finds strong and consistent evidence of greater risk between initial e-cigarette use and subsequent cigarette smoking initiation, regardless of how initiation was defined and net other factors that predict cigarette smoking. (2017-06-28)
Cotton candy capillaries lead to circuit boards that dissolve when cooled
The silver nanowires are held together in the polymer so that they touch, and as long as the polymer doesn't dissolve, the nanowires will form a path to conduct electricity similar to the traces on a circuit board. (2017-06-27)
Sweet bribes for ants are key to crops bearing fruit, study shows
Some flowering crops, such as beans and cotton, carefully manage the amount and sweetness of nectar produced on their flowers and leaves, to recruit colonising ants which deter herbivores. (2017-06-23)
Special journal issue showcases Aalto University's materials research
The 12 articles in the special issue of Advanced Electronic Materials investigate materials and devices that are being researched for their applications in micro-electronics, opto-electronics, thermo-electricity generation, photovoltaics and quantum technologies. (2017-06-14)
Largest genome-wide study of lung cancer susceptibility identifies new causes
A huge study identified several new variants for lung cancer risk that will translate into improved understanding of the mechanisms involved in lung cancer risk (2017-06-13)
E-cigarettes potentially as harmful as tobacco cigarettes, UConn study shows
UConn study shows nicotine-based e-cigarettes are potentially as harmful as unfiltered cigarettes when it comes to causing DNA damage. (2017-06-12)
First step taken toward epigenetically modified cotton
Scientists have produced a 'methylome' for domesticated cotton and its wild ancestors, a powerful new tool to guide breeders in creating cotton with better traits based on epigenetic changes. (2017-05-30)
Secret weapon of smart bacteria tracked to 'sweet tooth'
Researchers have figured out how a once-defeated bacterium has re-emerged to infect cotton in a battle that could sour much of the Texas and US crop. (2017-05-24)
A better sustainable sanitary pad
Students led by University of Utah materials science and engineering assistant professor (lecturer) Jeff Bates have developed a new, 100-percent biodegradable feminine maxi pad that is made of all natural materials and is much thinner and more comfortable than other similar products. (2017-05-15)
Diverse rotations and poultry litter improves soybean yield
Possible sustainable solution to continuous cropping. (2017-05-15)
Cotton tip applicators are sending 34 kids to the emergency department each day
A study conducted by Nationwide Children's Hospital researchers found that over a 21-year period from 1990 through 2010, an estimated 263,000 children younger than 18 years of age were treated in US hospital emergency departments for cotton tip applicator related ear injuries -- that's about 12,500 annually, or about 34 injuries every day. (2017-05-08)
Immunity against melanoma is only skin deep
Researchers at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center find that unique immune cells, called resident memory T cells, do an outstanding job of preventing melanoma in patients who develop the autoimmune disease, vitiligo. (2017-04-14)
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