Current Coyotes News and Events

Current Coyotes News and Events, Coyotes News Articles.
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'Runway Roadkill' rapidly increasing at airports across the world, UCC study finds
The number of reported collisions (i.e. strikes) between aircraft and wildlife is increasing globally, with consequences for personnel and passenger safety as well as for industry economics. These are important considerations for airport operators that are obliged to mitigate wildlife hazards at airfields. Incidents involving mammals account for approximately 3-10% of all recorded strikes. However, relatively little research has been conducted on mammal strikes with aircraft outside of the USA. (2021-02-05)

The dire wolf was a distinct species, different from the gray wolf, biologists discover
The iconic, prehistoric dire wolf, which prowled through the Americas over 11 millennia ago, was a distinct species from the smaller gray wolf, an international team of scientists reports today in the journal Nature. The study, which puts to bed a mystery that biologists have pondered for more than 100 years, was led by researchers from UCLA, along with colleagues from Durham University in the UK, Australia's Adelaide University and Germany's Ludwig Maximilian University. (2021-01-13)

Ancient DNA reveals secrets of Game of Thrones wolves
Extinct dire wolves split off from other wolves nearly six million years ago and were only a distant relative of today's wolves, according to new research published in Nature. (2021-01-13)

Levels of stress hormone in saliva of newborn deer fawns may predict mortality
The first-ever study of the levels of the stress hormone cortisol in the saliva of newborn white-tailed deer fawns yielded thought-provoking results that have Penn State researchers suggesting predation is not the only thing in the wild killing fawns. (2021-01-11)

Comparing canine brains using 3D-endocast modelling
Based on digital endocranial cast models the canine brain does not increase proportionally with body size. Researchers at ELTE Eötvös Loránd and Kaposvár University in Hungary reconstructed the surface morphology of 28 canine brains, including various dog breeds, wolves, coyotes, and jackals. The shortening of the facial skeleton greatly influences the ratio of certain brain regions, primarily the olfactory bulb and the frontal lobe. These changes might have profound implications for olfactory and problem-solving abilities. (2020-10-22)

Carnivores living near people feast on human food, threatening ecosystems
MADISON - Ecologists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have found that carnivores living near people can get more than half of their diets from human food sources, a major lifestyle disruption that could put North America's carnivore-dominated ecosystems at risk. (2020-10-12)

Mathematical patterns developed by Alan Turing help researchers understand bird behavior
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have used mathematical modelling to understand why flocks of long-tailed tits segregate themselves into different parts of the landscape. (2020-08-11)

Michigan coyotes: What's for dinner depends on what the neighbors are having
Michigan coyotes in most of the Lower Peninsula are the ''top dogs'' in the local food chain and can dine on a wide variety of small animals, including rabbits and rodents, along with berries and other plant foods, insects, human garbage and even outdoor pet food. (2020-07-20)

'Fatal attraction': Small carnivores drawn to kill sites, then ambushed by larger kin
University of Washington researchers have discovered that large predators play a key yet unexpected role in keeping smaller predators and deer in check. Their 'fatal attraction' theory finds that smaller predators are drawn to the kill sites of large predators by the promise of leftover scraps, but the scavengers may be killed themselves if their larger kin return for seconds. (2020-03-18)

The do's and don'ts of monitoring many wildlife species at once
A new analysis of 92 studies from 27 countries conducted by ecologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst suggests that many recent multi-species studies of wildlife communities often incorrectly use the analytical tools and methods available. Technology such as trail cameras and drones have 'revolutionized wildlife monitoring studies' in recent years, says organismic and evolutionary biology doctoral student Kadambari Devarajan, who led the study, 'but if not properly used in well-designed research, they will compromise the reliability of the results obtained.' (2020-02-25)

Jaguars could prevent a not-so-great American biotic exchange
In eastern Panama, canid species from North and South America are occurring together for the first time. Urban and agricultural development and deforestation along the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor might be generating a new passageway for these invasive species adapted to human disturbance. (2020-01-06)

Mountain goats' air conditioning is failing, study says
A new study in the journal PLOS One says Glacier National Park's iconic mountain goats are in dire need of air conditioning. (2019-12-11)

Coastal fog linked to high levels of mercury found in mountain lions, study finds
Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have discovered elevated levels of mercury in mountain lions, the latest indication that the neurotoxin is being carried in fog, deposited on the land, and making its way up the food chain. (2019-11-26)

Division by subtraction: Extinction of large mammal species likely drove survivors apart
A new study in Science suggests that the extinctions of mammoths, dire wolves and other large mammal species in North America drove surviving species to distance themselves from their neighbors, reducing interactions as predators and prey, territorial competitors or scavengers. The discovery could preview the ecological effects of future extinctions, the researchers say. (2019-09-19)

Intense look at La Brea Tar Pits explains why we have coyotes, not saber-toothed cats
The most detailed study to date of ancient predators trapped in the La Brea Tar Pits is helping Americans understand why today we're dealing with coyotes dumping over garbage cans and not saber-toothed cats ripping our arms off. (2019-08-05)

'Citizen scientists' help track foxes, coyotes in urban areas
As foxes and coyotes adapt to urban landscapes, the potential for encounters with humans necessarily goes up. A team of scientists is taking advantage of this fact to enlist the eyeballs and fingertips of humans -- getting them to report online what they see in their own neighborhoods and parks. (2019-06-04)

ESA tipsheet for May 6, 2019
Get a sneak peek at these new scientific papers in the Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment: Nature reserves and wilderness areas plagued by understaffing and budget shortfalls; Extremely old trees endure in China; Fuel breaks stop wildfire in its tracks -- but may create new problems; Connecting species to possible future safe havens; and Wildfires as an ecosystem service. (2019-05-02)

Americans' beliefs about wildlife management are changing
A new 50-state study on America's Wildlife Values led by researchers at Colorado State University and The Ohio State University describes individuals' values toward wildlife. (2019-04-25)

Can multiple carnivores coexist in cities?
A new citizen science study shows how urbanization may affect interactions between carnivores in small suburban forest patches, using camera trap images from Raleigh, N.C., and Washington, D.C. (2019-04-16)

New study questions effects of reintroducing top predators
There's little evidence that reintroducing top predators to ecosystems will return them to the conditions that existed before they were wiped out, according to new research. (2019-04-03)

The recent spread of coyotes across North America did not doom deer populations
Coyotes eat deer, but not enough to limit the deer population at a large scale. A new study of deer numbers across the eastern United States has found that the arrival and establishment of coyote predators has not caused the number of deer harvested by hunters to decline. (2019-03-20)

Study reveals that coyotes are not controlling deer populations in eastern US states
Coyotes expanded their range to colonize eastern North America over the last century, where their impacts on white-tailed deer populations are highly debated. In a Journal of Wildlife Management study, researchers conducted the first long-term, large scale assessment and documented no consistent decline in deer harvest numbers after coyote arrival. (2019-03-20)

When coyote parents get used to humans, their offspring become bolder, too
When coyote parents are habituated to humans, their offspring are more habituated, too -- potentially leading to negative interactions between coyotes and humans. (2019-03-11)

Rating riverside corridors -- the 'escape routes' for animals under climate change
While riverside habitats are known to be important for species migrating under climate change, this is the first study to rank riparian areas as targets for restoration and conservation efforts. (2019-02-08)

Skull scans tell tale of how world's first dogs caught their prey
Analysis of the skulls of lions, wolves and hyenas has helped scientists uncover how prehistoric dogs hunted 40 million years ago. (2019-01-11)

Camera trap study reveals the hidden lives of island carnivores
Researchers placed 160 cameras on 19 of the 22 Apostle Islands in northern Wisconsin to see which carnivores were living there. After taking more than 200,000 photos over a period of three years, the team discovered that several carnivores are living on various islands in this remote archipelago in Lake Superior. (2018-12-21)

Red wolf DNA found in mysterious Texas canines
Princeton biologists Bridgett vonHoldt and Elizabeth Heppenheimer discovered that a mysterious group of canines spotted on Galveston Island, Texas, share DNA with both coyotes and a captive breeding group of red wolves from North Carolina. The animals also have unique genetic material that may represent genes that had been lost in the small population of wolves that began the captive breeding program in the 1970s. (2018-12-18)

A future for red wolves may be found on Galveston Island
Red wolves, once nearly extinct, again teeter on the abyss. New research finds red wolf ancestry in Texas -- providing opportunities for additional conservation action and difficult policy challenges. Michigan Tech researcher Kristin Brzeski and others have identified red wolf ''ghost alleles'' in canid population on Galveston Island. (2018-12-11)

Wild suburbia
It's a jungle out there in the suburbs, where many wild mammals are thriving near humans. That's the conclusion of a large-scale study using camera trap images from hundreds of citizen scientists in Washington, D.C., and Raleigh, North Carolina. (2018-10-02)

Sniffing out error in detection dog data
New research finds three alternative answers beyond errors in handler or dog training that can explain why dogs trained to identify scat for conservation purposes sometimes collect non-target scats. (2018-09-14)

Surviving large carnivores have far-reaching impact
Anywhere large-bodied mammalian carnivore species are present, other, smaller carnivores are less likely to occur, according to an international team of researchers that conducted the first global assessment of carnivore interactions using camera trap data. (2018-08-08)

Forest ecology shapes Lyme disease risk in the eastern US
In the eastern US, risk of contracting Lyme disease is higher in fragmented forests with high rodent densities and low numbers of resident fox, opossum, and raccoons. These are among the findings from an analysis of 19 years of data on the ecology of tick-borne disease in a forested landscape, recently published in the journal Ecology. (2018-07-09)

Researchers explore whether smarter animals are bigger troublemakers
A new paper in the journal Animal Behaviour examines whether smarter animals might be better at learning to live in cities -- but, at the same time, also may come into more conflict with humans. (2018-06-18)

How coyotes conquered the continent
Using museum specimens and fossil records, researchers have produced a comprehensive (and unprecedented) range history of coyotes that can help reveal the ecology of predation as well as evolution through hybridization. (2018-05-22)

Hunger guides mountain lions' actions to enter residential areas
In a new study, researchers found that while big cats like mountain lions are generally fearful of and avoid humans, hunger can dampen that fear. (2018-03-13)

Urban foxes and coyotes learn to set aside their differences and coexist
Diverging from centuries of established behavioral norms, red fox and coyote have gone against their wild instincts and learned to coexist in the urban environment of Madison and the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus, according to a recently published study in the journal PLOS One. (2018-01-30)

Coyotes and red foxes may coexist within urban landscapes
Coyotes and red foxes may select different types of habitats for their home ranges, helping them to coexist in urban environments, according to a study published Jan. 24, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Marcus A. Mueller from the University of Wisconsin, USA, and colleagues. (2018-01-24)

Study examines conflict between farmers and livestock predators
A new Journal of Wildlife Management study conducted in South Africa has found that black-backed jackals, a similar species to coyotes and dingoes, prefer to eat livestock rather than similar-sized wild prey, which has important consequences for livestock husbandry and the management of predators. (2017-12-20)

Why are coyote populations difficult to control?
Conventional wisdom suggests that coyote control efforts actually result in an increase in the number of coyotes due to increasing litter sizes and pregnancy rates among individuals that survive. (2017-08-31)

CU study: Ancient DNA used to track Mesa Verde exodus in 13th century
Ancient DNA used to track the mass exodus of Ancestral Pueblo people from Colorado's Mesa Verde region in the late 13th century indicates many wound up in the Northern Rio Grande area north of Santa Fe, N.M., inhabited today by the Tewa Pueblo people. (2017-08-10)

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