Current Crab News and Events

Current Crab News and Events, Crab News Articles.
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Managing crab and lobster catches could offer long-term benefits
A study by the University of Plymouth (UK) has found that managing the density of crab and lobster pots at an optimum level increases the quality of catch, benefits the marine environment and makes the industry more sustainable in the long term. (2021-02-15)

Spectacular 'honeycomb heart' revealed in iconic stellar explosion
A unique 'heart-shape', with wisps of gas filaments showing an intricate honeycomb-like arrangement, has been discovered at the centre of the iconic supernova remnant, the Crab Nebula. Astronomers have mapped the void in unprecedented detail, creating a realistic three-dimensional reconstruction. The new work is published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. (2021-02-10)

The power of groupthink: Study shows why ideas spread in social networks
New research shows that large groups of people all tend to think alike, and also illustrates how easily people's opinions can be swayed by social media--even by artificial users known as bots. (2021-02-10)

Ocean toxin a heartbreaking threat for sea otters
Heart disease is a killer threat for southern sea otters feasting on domoic acid in their food web, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis. Climate change projections indicate that toxic blooms and domoic acid exposure will continue to rise. (2021-01-26)

Dungeness crab fishing industry response to climate shock
Fishermen contend with regulations, natural disasters, and the ups and downs of the stocks they fish, along with many other changes. As a result, fishing communities are quite resilient. That is, they can withstand, recover from, and adapt to change. (2021-01-05)

Bait and switch
Seafood is the world's most highly traded food commodity, and reports of seafood mislabeling have increased over the past decade. However, proof of the environmental effects of mislabeled seafood has been scant as has research. So, Arizona State University researcher Kailin Kroetz and her colleagues analyzed the impact of seafood mislabeling on marine population health, fishery management effectiveness, and habitats and ecosystems in the United States, the world's largest seafood importer. (2020-12-22)

Chemists from RUDN University synthesized chitin-based antibiotics
?hemists from RUDN University discovered previously unknown derivatives of chitin, a biopolymer that forms the exoskeletons of insects and carapaces of crayfish and other arthropods. The new compounds and their nanoparticles have antibacterial properties and are able to catalyze chemical reactions. (2020-12-14)

Chemists from RUDN University used crab shells to improve palladium catalysts
?hemists from RUDN University synthesized soluble biopolymers based on chitin from crab shells. Together with palladium, they form effective catalysts for organic reactions, and their nanoparticles can be re-used over ten times. (2020-12-14)

How seaweed-munching crabs could help save coral reefs
Coral reefs are facing a steep decline today for many reasons, including climate change, overfishing, pollution, disease, and more. What's taking their place is lots and lots of seaweed. But researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on December 10 now have some encouraging news: native crabs can help to combat the seaweed and restore the reef. (2020-12-10)

To push or to pull? How many-limbed marine organisms swim
Couinter-intuitively, small marine animals don't use their limbs or propulsors to push themselves through the water while swimming. Instead, their appendages create negative pressure behind them that pulls the animal through the water, scientists from the Marine Biological Laboratory report. (2020-11-24)

Seafood mislabeling is having negative impacts on the marine environment
As the most globally traded food commodity, seafood production and its supply chains are often complex and opaque. Contemporaneous with the increase in seafood consumption, evidence of mislabeling has become ubiquitous. Yet, little is known about the consequences of seafood mislabeling. New research by Advanced Conservation Strategies and colleagues show that conditions exist for mislabeling to generate negative impacts on marine populations and to support consumption of products from poorly managed fisheries. (2020-11-16)

Touch and taste? It's all in the tentacles
Scientists identified a novel family of sensors in the first layer of cells inside the suction cups that have adapted to react and detect molecules that don't dissolve well in water. The research suggests these sensors, called chemotactile receptors, use these molecules to help the animal figure out what it's touching and whether that object is prey. (2020-10-29)

Triggerfish learns to catch more diverse food
In probably the first observation of its kind, a tricky triggerfish is seen beaching itself before attacking a crab walking along the shoreline. (2020-10-19)

Scientists release previously unseen footage showing environmental impacts of pot fishing
The findings of research by the University of Plymouth go against previous thinking around the damage caused by pot fishing to the seabed (2020-10-13)

Crabs are key to ecology and economy in Oman
The intertidal mudflats of Barr Al Hikman, a nature reserve at the south-east coast of the Sultanate Oman, are crucial nursery grounds for numerous crab species. In return, crabs are a vital element of the ecology, as well as the regional economy, a new publication in Hydrobiologia shows. 'These important functions of the crabs should be considered when looking at the increasing human pressure on this nature reserve', first author and NIOZ-researcher Roeland Bom says. (2020-10-08)

Metal-ion breakthrough leads to new biomaterials
Metals such as iron and calcium play a crucial role inside the human body, so it's no surprise that bioengineers would like to integrate them into the soft, stretchy materials used to repair skin, blood vessels, lungs and other tissue. (2020-09-30)

VLBA makes first direct distance measurement to magnetar
Using the VLBA, astronomers have made the first direct geometric measurement of the distance to a magnetar. This precision measurement to one of the most magnetic objects in the Universe could help scientists determine if such objects are responsible for generating the mysterious Fast Radio Bursts. (2020-09-18)

Notice me! Neglected for over a century, Black sea spider crab re-described
Even though recognised in the Mediterranean Sea, the Macropodia czernjawskii spider crab was ignored by scientists (even by its namesake, 19th-century biologist Vladimir Czernyavsky) in the regional faunal accounts of the Black Sea for more than a century. Now, scientists re-describe this, most likely, sole species of the genus to occur in the Black Sea. The finding was published in the open-access journal Zoosystematics and Evolution. (2020-09-01)

Climate change is impacting the spread of invasive animal species
What factors influence the spread of invasive animal species in our oceans? (2020-07-22)

Two new species of parasite discovered in crabs -- discovery will help prevent infection of other marine species
Two new species of parasite, previously unknown to science, have been discovered in crabs in Swansea Bay, Wales, during a study on disease in the Celtic and Irish Seas. Both species are emerging pathogens, and were discovered infecting the common shore crab, so they could potentially have damaging effects on fisheries and other marine species. The researchers' discovery will help inform measures to reduce this risk. (2020-07-15)

Burrowing crabs reshaping salt marshes, with climate change to blame
Given higher sea levels and softer soil in the wake of a shifting climate, Sesarma crabs, which have already decimated salt marshes in the Northeast, are now rising to prominence in southeastern marshes, a new study finds. (2020-07-13)

This supernova in a lab mimics the cosmic blast's splendid aftermath
Mystery enshrouds the birth of swirls typical for supernova remnants like the Crab Nebula. A new 'supernova machine' may help solve it. (2020-06-17)

Scientists detect crab nebula using innovative gamma-ray telescope
The prototype Schwarzschild-Couder Telescope (SCT)--developed by scientists at the Columbia University in collaboration with researchers from other institutions--is part of an international effort, known as the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), which aims to construct the world's largest and most powerful gamma-ray observatory, with more than 100 similar telescopes in the northern and southern hemispheres. (2020-06-02)

Oyster farming and shorebirds likely can coexist
Oyster farming as currently practiced along the Delaware Bayshore does not significantly impact four shorebirds, including the federally threatened red knot, which migrates thousands of miles from Chile annually, according to a Rutgers-led study. The findings, published in the journal Ecosphere, likely apply to other areas around the country including the West Coast and Gulf Coast, where oyster aquaculture is expanding, according to Rutgers experts. (2020-05-14)

The North Atlantic right whale population is in poor condition
New research reveals that endangered North Atlantic right whales are in poorer body condition than individual whales from the three well recovering populations of Southern right whales. This difference is alarming: poor body condition for North Atlantic right whales explains why too many of them are dying, and why they are not giving birth to enough calves to boost the population's recovery. The results has been published in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series. (2020-04-27)

North Atlantic right whales are in much poorer condition than Southern right whales
New research by an international team of scientists reveals that endangered North Atlantic right whales are in much poorer body condition than their counterparts in the southern hemisphere. (2020-04-23)

Animals keep viruses in the sea in balance
A variety of sea animals can take up virus particles while filtering seawater for oxygen and food. Sponges are particularly efficient. That was written by marine ecologist Jennifer Welsh from NIOZ this week, in a publication in Nature Scientific Reports. This Monday, Welsh will defend her thesis at the Free University of Amsterdam, through an online connection. (2020-03-27)

Science publishes study on Neanderthals as pioneers in marine resource exploitation
The journal Science has published a study led by the University of Barcelona, which presents the results of the excavation in Cueva de Figueira Brava, Portugal, which was used as shelter by Neanderthal populations about between 86,000 and 106,000 years ago. The study reveals fishing and shellfish-gathering contributed significantly to the subsistence economy of the inhabitants of Figueira Brava. The relevance of this discovery lies in the fact that so far, there were not many signs of these practices as common among Neanderthals. (2020-03-26)

Building a better color vision test for animals
University of Cincinnati biologists modified simple electronics to create a color vision test for fiddler crabs and other animals. (2020-03-19)

Ship noise leaves crabs too stressed to hide from danger
The ocean is getting too loud even for crabs. Normally, shore crabs (Carcinus maenas) can slowly change their shell color to blend in with the rocky shore, but recent findings show that prolonged exposure to the sounds of ships weakens their camouflaging powers and leaves them more open to attack. The work, appearing March 9 in the journal Current Biology, illustrates how man-made undersea noise can turn shore crabs into sitting ducks for predators. (2020-03-09)

Ship noise hampers crab camouflage
Colour-changing crabs struggle to camouflage themselves when exposed to noise from ships, new research shows. (2020-03-09)

West coast dungeness crab stable or increasing even with intensive harvest, research shows
Fishermen from California to Washington caught almost all the available legal-size male Dungeness crab each year in the last few decades. However, the crab population has either remained stable or continued to increase, according to the first thorough population estimate of the West Coast Dungeness stocks. (2020-03-06)

Cuttlefish eat less for lunch when they know there'll be shrimp for dinner
Cuttlefish can rapidly learn from experience and adapt their eating behavior accordingly, a new study has shown. (2020-02-04)

Crab-shell and seaweed compounds spin into yarns for sustainable and functional materials
Biobased fibres are made from two renewable marine resources and with promise in advanced applications, in wovens and medical materials, among others. The threads draw strength from the crab chitin component and flexibility from seaweed alginate. (2020-01-28)

Study connects marine heat wave with spike in whale entanglements
Climate change is increasing the frequency and severity of marine heat waves -- warm water anomalies that disrupt marine ecosystems -- and this is creating new challenges for fisheries management and ocean conservation. A new study shows how the record-breaking marine heat wave of 2014 to 2016 caused changes along the US West Coast that led to an unprecedented spike in the numbers of whales that became entangled in fishing gear. (2020-01-27)

'Blob' research shows ecological effects that halted fishing and hiked whale entanglements
An ecological pileup of unprecedented changes in the ocean off the West Coast beginning about 2014 led to record entanglements of humpback and other whales, putting the region's most valuable commercial fishery at risk, new research shows. (2020-01-27)

Microplastics affect sand crabs' mortality and reproduction, PSU study finds
Sand crabs, a key species in beach ecosystems, were found to have increased adult mortality and decreased reproductive success when exposed to plastic microfibers, according to a new Portland State University study. (2020-01-17)

The carbon footprint of dinner: How 'green' are fish sticks?
Fish sticks may be a tasty option for dinner, but are they good for the planet? A new study of the climate impacts of seafood products reveals that the processing of Alaskan pollock into fish sticks, imitation crab, and fish fillets generates significant greenhouse gas emissions. (2020-01-16)

Jaguars could prevent a not-so-great American biotic exchange
In eastern Panama, canid species from North and South America are occurring together for the first time. Urban and agricultural development and deforestation along the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor might be generating a new passageway for these invasive species adapted to human disturbance. (2020-01-06)

Scientists use crabs to validate popular method to identify unknown human brain neurons
A crab's nervous system could help scientists learn what causes single neurons in the human brain to become 'out of whack,' which can contribute to the development of neurological diseases like Alzheimer's disease. Knowing exactly how a single neuron operates among the billions housed in the human brain could one day help scientists design innovative ways to prevent and treat these diseases, such as targeted therapies. (2019-12-06)

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