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Current Crab News and Events, Crab News Articles.
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Compound eyes: The visual apparatus of today's horseshoe crabs goes back 400 million years
The extinct sea scorpion species Jaekelopterus rhenaniae had eyes comparable to those of today's horseshoe crabs. The two-and-a-half-meter predator was particularly apt at perceiving contrasts and contours under water. (2019-12-03)

Ecofriendly nano-fabrication achieved with biodegradable chitosan nanoparticles
The Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials (KIMM) succeeded in creating glass with self-cleaning and antireflective functions through the biodegradable chitosan nanoparticle coating. This is the first use of a biodegradable material in nanosphere lithography. The results of the study can be utilized to prevent the use of synthetic polymer nanoparticles in nano-fabrication, a kind of microplastic waste, which have been associated with toxicity issues. (2019-11-28)

Tiny fossils, big findings: UAlberta paleontologists discover odd mid-Cretaceous shrimp
One of the most incomplete fossil records of marine life is being filled in by a new find by a team of paleontologists from the University of Alberta, Yale University, and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute -- with the discovery of hundreds of tiny comma shrimp fossils. (2019-11-28)

Study measures impact of agriculture on diet of wild mammals
In an article published in PNAS, Brazilian researchers stress the need for agricultural management that favors the maintenance of wildlife. (2019-11-18)

Crab disease poses threat to shellfish stocks
Shore crabs carry parasites that pose a major threat to shellfish stocks. In a new study, Swansea University researchers have used several different detection methods, including taking DNA from seawater, to build up the first comprehensive picture of the problem. (2019-10-30)

Two new porcelain crab species discovered
Two new symbiotic porcelain crab species have been described. One of them, from the South China Sea of Vietnam, inhabits the compact tube-like shelters built by the polychaete worm with other organisms. The other inhabits the intertidal vermetid snail formations in the Colombian Caribbean. (2019-10-15)

Response rate to albumin-bound paclitaxel plus gemcitabine plus cisplatin treatment among patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: A phase 1b/2 pilot clinical trial
Published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Oncology, researchers at HonorHealth Research Institute and TGen, an affiliate of City of Hope, found that among a clinical trial of 25 patients, adding the drug cisplatin to a current standard-of-care drug regimen resulted in substantial tumor shrinkage for 71 percent of those patients, and dramatically increased survival beyond one year. (2019-10-03)

Coral reefs and squat lobsters flourished 150 million years ago
An amazing trove of 150 million-year-old coral reef fossils from eastern Austria -- at the time a shallow sea -- provides a snapshot of a diverse and thriving community of creatures, including 53 species of squat lobsters. Neither lobster nor crab, they are a key part of today's coral reefs, but are likely to decline as coral dies, as happened to this reef 50 million years later with the drying up of the Tethys Sea. (2019-09-18)

Astrophysicists link brightening of pulsar wind nebula to pulsar spin-down rate transition
Astrophysicists have discovered that the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) surrounding the famous pulsar B0540-69 brightened gradually after the pulsar experienced a sudden spin-down rate transition (SRT). This discovery, made by a group of astrophysicists led by GE Mingyu and LU Fangjun at the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, provides important clues to the spin-down mechanism and the magnetic field structure of the pulsar, as well as the physical properties of the PWN. (2019-08-26)

Separate polarization and brightness channels give crabs the edge over predators
Fiddler crabs see the polarization of light and this gives them the edge when it comes to spotting potentials threats, such as a rival crab or a predator. Now researchers at the University of Bristol have begun to unravel how this information is processed within the crab's brain. The study, published in Science Advances today, has discovered that when detecting approaching objects, fiddler crabs separate polarization and brightness information. (2019-08-21)

Warmer winters could lead to longer blue crab season in Chesapeake Bay
Scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are predicting that warmer winters in the Chesapeake Bay will likely lead to longer and more productive seasons for Maryland's favorite summer crustacean, the blue crab. (2019-07-31)

Limits on pot fishing can result in win-win for fishermen and marine wildlife
The first major study into the impact of inshore potting for crab and lobster within a Marine Protected Area has found that in areas of low potting intensity the industry is operating in a way that had little impact on seabed species or economically-important shellfish. (2019-07-16)

The highest energy gamma rays discovered by the Tibet ASgamma experiment
The Tibet ASgamma experiment, a China-Japan joint research project, has discovered the highest energy cosmic gamma rays ever observed from an astrophysical source - in this case, the 'Crab Nebula.' The experiment detected gamma rays ranging from > 100 Teraelectron volts (TeV) to an estimated 450 TeV. (2019-07-03)

Biomedical bleeding may impact horseshoe crabs' spawning behavior and movement
Horseshoe crabs that have undergone biomedical bleeding tend to reside in deeper water and approach mating beaches less often, according to a new study published in The Biological Bulletin. In 'Effects of the Biomedical Bleeding Process on the Behavior of the American Horseshoe Crab, Limulus polyphemus in Its Natural Habitat,' Meghan Owings and her colleagues report the results of an investigation of the behavioral and physiological effects that the bleeding process has on horseshoe crabs that are released back into their natural environment. (2019-06-20)

Chimps caught crabbing
Kyoto University researchers report on chimpanzees in Guinea fishing and consuming freshwater crabs, something previously undiscovered. The paper describes how this is a potential clue in explaining how our primarily fruit-eating ancestors began eating aquatic life, and supplementing their diet with nutrients critical for brain development. (2019-05-29)

Chimpanzees catch and eat crabs
Chimpanzees have a mainly vegetarian diet, but do occasionally eat meat. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown for the first time that chimpanzees also eat crabs. In the rainforest of Guinea, the researchers observed how chimpanzees regularly fish for crabs. (2019-05-29)

Crabs' camouflage tricks revealed
Crabs from a single species rely on different camouflage techniques depending on what habitat they live in, new research shows. (2019-05-24)

Fooling nerve cells into acting normal
In a new study, scientists at the University of Missouri have discovered that a neuron's own electrical signal, or voltage, can indicate whether the neuron is functioning normally. If that voltage is absent, scientists say everything is 'out of whack.' (2019-05-09)

Low oxygen levels could temporarily blind marine invertebrates
Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego have found that low oxygen levels in seawater could blind some marine invertebrates. (2019-05-08)

This hawk likes crab for dinner
This is the first report of a red-shouldered hawk attacking and presumably consuming any species of crab and the first report of probable ghost crab predation by a raptor in North America. (2019-05-02)

Biomimicry of basic instinct
Chemical engineers at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering have recreated collaboration and competition responses within a microchamber environment of microscopic particles, sheets, and catalysts, effectively mimicking responses of feeding, fighting, and fleeing. (2019-04-25)

Meet Callichimaera perplexa, the platypus of crabs
The crab family just got a bunch of new cousins -- including a 95-million-year-old chimera species that will force scientists to rethink the definition of a crab. (2019-04-24)

Scientists unearth 'utterly bizarre' chimera crab fossil
University of Alberta paleontologists discover a new-- and bizarre -- species of 90- to 95-million-year-old crab fossil with features of many different marine arthropods, calling to mind the chimera of Greek mythology. 'We have an idea of what a typical crab looks like -- and these new fossils break all those rules,' said Javier Luque, postdoctoral paleontologist in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Alberta. (2019-04-24)

Fossil crab reveals a new branch in the tree of life
Taking on characteristics from another, younger stage in its life-cycle, a newly named fossil crab species was able to adapt to new conditions. (2019-04-24)

Marine Skin dives deeper for better monitoring
A pioneering tagging system that monitors the movement and local environment of sea animals reaches deeper depths and higher sensitivities. (2019-04-22)

Hubble celebrates its 29th birthday with unrivaled view of the Southern Crab Nebula
This incredible image of the hourglass-shaped Southern Crab Nebula was taken to mark the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's 29th anniversary in space. The nebula, created by a binary star system, is one of the many objects that Hubble has demystified throughout its productive life. This new image adds to our understanding of the nebula and demonstrates the telescope's continued capabilities. (2019-04-18)

Unprecedented number of warm-water species moved northward during marine heatwave
A UC Davis study documents an unprecedented number of southern marine species moving northward into California and as far north as Oregon during the 2014-2016 marine heatwave. Of 67 rare, warm-water species sightings observed, 37 had never been documented so far north before. (2019-03-12)

The fiddlers influencing mangrove ecosystems
The types of bacteria living in and around fiddler crab burrows vary widely between mangroves, but their functional activities are remarkably similar. (2019-03-11)

Researchers discover a flipping crab feeding on methane seeps
Researchers have documented a group of tanner crabs vigorously feeding at a methane seep on the seafloor off British Columbia -- one of the first times a commercially harvested species has been seen using this energy source. (2019-02-20)

Study finds Tropical Cyclone Winston damaged fisheries as well as homes in Fiji
A newly published study by WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) has found that impacts of Tropical Cyclone Winston on the coastal communities of Fiji went beyond the immediate loss of lives and infrastructure. The cyclone also had a lingering effect on the fisheries many communities depend on, particularly on the availability of commercially important crustaceans. (2018-12-21)

NUS study explains how a spider and a pitcher plant can benefit from collaboration
Two recent studies by ecologists from the National University of Singapore have shed light on the relationship between the slender pitcher plant and its 'tenant', the crab spider Thomisus nepenthiphilus, providing insights to the little known foraging behaviours of the spider. (2018-11-11)

Research reveals secret shared by comets and sand crabs
Researchers at Nagoya University find a mechanical connection between sand crab burrow widths and widths of cometary pits using a simple granular experiment. (2018-10-25)

Blue crab baby sizes and shapes influence their survival
Like people, blue crabs aren't all the same sizes and shapes. Now Rutgers scientists have discovered substantial differences in the body structures of larval crab siblings and among larvae from different mothers. And that can mean the difference between an early death and survival into adulthood for this important commercial and recreational species. (2018-10-17)

From guts to glory: The evolution of gut defense
Gut 'missing link' shows how mammals evolved to live with their microbes. (2018-08-24)

Biomimetic micro/nanoscale fiber reinforced composites
For the first time, through a programmed and consecutive 'brushing-and-laminating' assembly strategy, macroscopic 3-D bulk biomimetic twisted plywood structural materials with comprehensive mimicry of structural and mechanical characteristics of their natural counterparts are successfully fabricated from 1D micro/nanoscale building blocks under mild conditions. As expected, they achieve excellent mechanical properties superior to many natural, artificial and engineering materials. More importantly, the proposed assembly strategy is high-efficient, scalable and material-independent. (2018-08-10)

Genetic 'toolkit' helps periwinkles gain advantage on the seashore
Periwinkles, struggling to survive the seashore battleground, have developed a genetic 'toolkit' to help them adapt to different environments, a new study shows. (2018-08-07)

Material formed from crab shells and trees could replace flexible plastic packaging
Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology have created a material derived from crab shells and tree fibers that has the potential to replace the flexible plastic packaging used to keep food fresh. (2018-07-23)

Study shows 5,000 percent increase in native trees on rat-free palmyra atoll
New research published in PLOS ONE this week demonstrates dramatic positive benefits for native trees following rat removal at Palmyra Atoll, a magnificent National Wildlife Refuge and natural research laboratory located about 1000 miles south of Hawaii. For five native tree species, including Pisonia grandis, fewer than 150 seedlings were counted in the presence of rats, and more than 7700 seedlings were counted five years after rats were removed. (2018-07-17)

Seeing through the eyes of a crab
Crabs combine the input from their two eyes early on in their brain's visual pathway to track a moving object, finds new research published in JNeurosci. This study of adult male crabs from Argentina's Atlantic coast provides insight into the visual world of a crustacean. (2018-07-16)

Invaluable to the medical industry, the horseshoe crab is under threat
The biomedical industry depends on blood from horseshoe crabs for drug and environmental safety testing -- but this commercial demand, together with capture for bait, climate change and habitat destruction, is threatening populations of these 'living fossils.' This in turn will detrimentally affect the surrounding ecosystem, such as migratory shorebirds who rely on horseshoe crab eggs for food. Sustainable alternatives to horseshoe crab blood tests should be developed in conjunction with better harvesting and conservation strategies. (2018-07-04)

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