Current Crickets News and Events

Current Crickets News and Events, Crickets News Articles.
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Marmoset monkeys have personalities too
An international team of behavioral biologists from Austria, Brazil and the Netherlands, with Vedrana Å lipogor from the University of Vienna as leading author of the study, designed a set of tasks to assess personality of common marmosets. These results have just been published in American Journal of Primatology. (2021-02-08)

Traffic noise makes mating crickets less picky
New research has found that the mating behaviour of crickets is significantly affected by traffic noise and other man-made sounds. When man-made noise pollution was present, the females didn't take into account the courtship song of the male crickets during mating. As the courtship song is energetically costly and provides crucial information about the health of the male, this could affect long-term population viability as females could choose less suitable mates. (2021-02-01)

Putting bugs on the menu, safely
The thought of eating insects is stomach turning for many, but new Edith Cowan University (ECU) research is shedding light on allergy causing proteins which could pose serious health risks for those suffering from shellfish allergy. The research, published in the journal Food Chemistry, identified 20 proteins found in cricket food products which could cause serious allergic reactions. (2021-01-27)

How insects activate muscles to adapt to limbs removed
Adaptability explains why insects spread so widely and why they are the most abundant animal group on earth. Insects exhibit resilient and flexible locomotion, even with drastic changes in their body structure such as losing a limb. (2021-01-14)

Eurasian eagle owl diet reveals new records of threatened giant bush-crickets
Bird diets provide a real treasure for research into the distribution and conservation of their prey, conclude scientists after studying the Eurasian Eagle Owl in southeastern Bulgaria. In their paper, published in the open-access, peer-reviewed journal Travaux du Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle ''Grigore Antipa'', they report the frequent presence of the threatened Big-Bellied Glandular Bush-Cricket, and conclude that studies on the Eurasian Eagle Owl could be used to identify biodiversity-rich areas in need of protection. (2021-01-05)

Researchers hear more crickets and katydids 'singing in the suburbs'
he songs that crickets and katydids sing at night to attract mates can help in monitoring and mapping their populations, according to Penn State researchers, whose study of Orthoptera species in central Pennsylvania also shed light on these insects' habitat preferences. (2020-10-01)

Mosquitos lost an essential gene with no ill effects
University of Maryland scientists discovered mosquitos are missing a gene that's critical for survival in other insects. Alys Jarvela noticed the missing gene and went on the hunt to find out how mosquitos survive without it. She identified the first example of nature swapping out closely related genes, a phenomenon that poses caveats for studies using model organisms as proxies for other species. The research was published September 30, 2020, in Communications Biology. (2020-09-30)

What did the katydids do when picking up bat sounds?
Ecosystems can be incredibly complex, with many interacting species. In many habitats, predators shape they behavior of prey and prey shape the behavior of predators. This paper provides a detailed look at the predator-prey relationship between bats and katydids, a group of insects related to crickets and grasshoppers. (2020-08-28)

An ancient association? Crickets disperse seeds of early-diverging orchid Apostasia nipponica
Associate Professor SUETSUGU Kenji (Kobe University Graduate School of Science) presents evidence of the apparently unusual seed dispersal system by crickets and camel crickets in Apostasia nipponica (Apostasioideae), acknowledged as an early-diverging lineage of Orchidaceae. These findings are published on August 11 in the online edition of Evolution Letters. (2020-08-10)

Eavesdropping crickets drop from the sky to evade capture by bats
Researchers have uncovered the highly efficient strategy used by a group of crickets to distinguish the calls of predatory bats from the incessant noises of the nocturnal jungle. The findings, led by scientists at the universities of Bristol and Graz in Austria and published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, reveal the crickets eavesdrop on the vocalizations of bats to help them escape their grasp when hunted. (2020-05-17)

Bush-crickets' ears unlock the science to developing revolutionary hearing sensors
Scientists could revolutionise auditory devices used for monitoring and surveillance purposes after new research into bush-crickets' ear canals found that they have evolved to work in the same way as mammals' ears to amplify sound and modulate sound pressure. Until now, the mechanism responsible for such changes, which affects directional hearing, has been unknown. (2020-02-11)

Biodiversity has substantially changed in one of the largest Mediterranean wetlands
The Camargue area in France has considerably fewer grasshopper, cricket, locust, dragonfly, and amphibian species than 40 years ago. On the other hand, there are more birds and vascular plants, some of them considered as new and highly invasive species. (2019-12-19)

UK insects struggling to find a home make a bee-line for foreign plants
Non-native plants are providing new homes for Britain's insects -- some of which are rare on native plants, a new study has found. (2019-12-16)

Insects share the same signaling pathway to form their 3-dimensional body
Zoologist shows that beetles, bugs and crickets control their body shape through Fog signalling / publication in 'eLife'. (2019-10-21)

Human medicines affect fish behavior
Human medicines that act on important signal systems in the brain make fish bolder, shows a new study on three-spined sticklebacks by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden. The results reinforce that the signal substances serotonin and dopamine play important roles in behavioral differences between individuals. Further, it shows that drugs that end up in the natural environment may have consequences for animal life. The study has been published in the Journal of Experimental Biology. (2019-10-16)

Are humans preventing flies from eavesdropping?
Soundscapes may influence the evolution of tightly co-evolved host-parasitoid relationships. Both traffic noise and natural ocean noise were found to inhibit parasitoid Ormia fly orientation to sound, which affects reproduction of the fly and survival of the cricket host. (2019-09-27)

Lab develops novel approach to study sound recognition in acoustically orienting animals
A new study by Dr. Norman Lee, in collaboration with St. Olaf College students Alexander Kirtley '19, Isaiah Pressman '19, and Karina (Kari) Jirik '20, and University of Toronto collaborators Dean Koucoulas and Dr. Andrew C. Mason, show a novel approach that can be used to study song recognition in O. ochracea. (2019-09-20)

Dry feed for superfood producers
Grasshoppers and crickets could provide a growing world population with a substantial portion of the protein it needs. For the first time ever, scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the International Centre for Insect Physiology and Ecology in Nairobi, Kenya, have explored what kind of feedstuffs might be suitable for environmentally friendly factory farming of insects. (2019-08-05)

Meet the six-legged superfoods: Grasshoppers top insect antioxidant-rich list
For the first time, a study has measured antioxidant levels in commercially available edible insects. For open-minded health freaks, it's good news: crickets pack 75% the antioxidant power of fresh OJ, and silkworm fat twice that of olive oil. And while even ladybirds fart, insects have a tiny land, water and carbon footprint compared with livestock -- so anything that encourages insect eating is good news for the planet, too. (2019-07-15)

Pair of supermassive black holes discovered on a collision course
Astronomers have spotted a pair of supermassive black holes on a collision course in a galaxy 2.5 billion light-years away. Coincidentally, the pair will begin producing gravitational waves in roughly 2.5 billion years, the researchers estimate. The duo can be used to estimate how many supermassive black hole pairs are detectable in the nearby, present-day universe and when the historic first detection of the background 'hum' of their gravitational waves will be made. (2019-07-10)

Older male crickets attract more females -- but have less sex
Older male crickets are better at getting females to live with them -- but they mate less than younger rivals once they find a partner. (2019-05-23)

Plentiful females keep male crickets young
Male crickets age more slowly if they have access to plenty of females, new research shows. (2019-04-02)

Which came first, the lizard or the egg?
In a world first, Sydney biologists have observed a three-toed skink lay eggs and give birth to a live baby from the same pregnancy, opening a useful pathway to study the evolution of pregnancy. (2019-04-02)

Venus flytrap 'teeth' form a 'horrid prison' for medium-sized prey
In 'Testing Darwin's Hypothesis about the Wonderful Venus Flytrap: Marginal Spikes Form a 'Horrid Prison' for Moderate-Sized Insect Prey,' Alexander L. Davis investigates the importance of marginal spikes, the 'teeth' lining the outer edge of the plant's snap traps, in successfully capturing prey. (2019-03-26)

What's for dinner? Sushi, with a side of crickets
While insects have been consumed for centuries worldwide, many people still haven't warmed to the idea of a creepy-crawly on the tongue. (2019-03-11)

Cricket females choose male losers
According to popular belief, females prefer males with high social status (alpha males) when as partners to continue the race. However, as recent studies have shown, males losing fights have equal or even greater chances of success among females. The study was published in Frontiers of Ecology and Evolution. (2019-02-08)

Let's prepare now so farming insects as food is environmentally friendly, say scientists
As whole-roasted crickets gain traction as a protein-rich snack and restaurants experiment with mealworms on the menu, there's still 'an overwhelming lack of knowledge' concerning the ecological sustainability of the emerging, multi-million-dollar insects-as-food industry, say researchers at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. In an opinion article published Jan. 14 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, they explore unanswered questions around insect rearing, safety, and environmental impacts. (2019-01-14)

Wild insects 'get old' before they die
Short-lived wild insects 'get old' -- losing some of their physical abilities -- before they die, new research shows. (2019-01-14)

Human pharmaceuticals change cricket personality
Crickets that are exposed to human drugs that alter serotonin levels in the brain are less active and less aggressive than crickets that have had no drug exposure, according to a new study led by researchers from Linköping University. The findings have been published in Scientific Reports. (2018-11-16)

New analysis about synchronization transitions improves knowledge of physical, biological systems
In physical, biological and technological systems, the time that a system's components take to influence each other can affect the transition to synchronization, an important finding that improves understanding of how these systems function, according to a study led by Georgia State University. (2018-11-06)

Total of 21 new parasitoid wasps following the first ever revision of their genus
As many as 21 species of parasitoid wasps are described as new to science, following the first ever revision of their genus since its establishment back in 1893. Currently amounting to 27 in total, all species inhabit the Neotropical region, apart from a single species known from west Africa. With their paper, published in the open access journal ZooKeys, the scientists also expand the biogeographic data for the genus and clarify its concept. (2018-09-11)

Eating crickets can be good for your gut, according to new clinical trial
A new clinical trial shows that consuming crickets can help support the growth of beneficial gut bacteria and that eating crickets is not only safe at high doses but may also reduce inflammation in the body. (2018-08-03)

Flies meet gruesome end under influence of puppeteer fungus
Various fungi are known to infect insects and alter their behavior, presumably to assist in spreading fungal spores as widely as possible. But little is known about how the fungi affect behavior. UC Berkeley scientists have now found a fungus that infects the common lab fly, Drosophila melanogaster, providing a model in which to explore behavior-manipulating fungi. They found that the fungus invades the nervous system first while slowly eating the fly's fat and organs. (2018-07-31)

Birds eat 400 to 500 million tonnes of insects annually
Birds around the world eat 400 to 500 million metric tonnes of beetles, flies, ants, moths, aphids, grasshoppers, crickets and other anthropods per year. These numbers have been calculated in a study led by Martin Nyffeler of the University of Basel in Switzerland. The research, published in Springer's journal The Science of Nature, highlights the important role birds play in keeping plant-eating insect populations under control. (2018-07-09)

Animal cyborg: Behavioral control by 'toy' craving circuit
Children love to get toys from parents for their birthday present. This craving toward items also involves object hoarding disorders and shopping addiction. However, the biological meaning of why the brain pursues objects or items has remained unknown. Part of the answer may lie with a neural circuit in the hypothalamus associated with 'object craving,' says neuroscientist Daesoo Kim from the Department of Biological Sciences at KAIST. (2018-04-23)

One species described multiple times: How taxonomists contribute to biodiversity discovery
While working on a rare little known group of Oriental wasps that likely parasitize the eggs of grasshoppers, locusts or crickets, not only did a team of four entomologists discover four previously unknown species, but they also found that another four species were in fact one and the same. Their study, published in the open-access journal Zookeys, is a fine example for the important role played by taxonomists in puzzling out the Earth's biodiversity. (2018-03-29)

When natural disaster strikes, can insects and other invertebrates recover?
After a 100-year flood struck south central Oklahoma in 2015, a study of the insects, arthropods, and other invertebrates in the area revealed striking declines of most invertebrates in the local ecosystem, a result that researchers say illustrates the hidden impacts of natural disasters. (2018-03-15)

Eating insects might seem yucky, but they are nutritious and there is no reason you can't
Almost all living primates still have working versions of the gene needed to produce a stomach enzyme that breaks down exoskeletons. This means that the 'yuck' factor when it comes to eating insects has nothing to do with nutrition, digestion or evolution. (2018-01-24)

Habitat counts when predators lurk
Something in the way it moves -- or not -- can save a creature's life in the wild, depending on whether it's exposed in the open or hiding in a complex habitat. A Rice University researcher studied patterns among a set of predator-prey pairings to see how the latter behaved when hunted. (2017-12-13)

Wing structure vital in producing a range of tones in bush-cricket mating calls
The structure of the sound generators in the wings of male bush-crickets is critical for producing tonality within the long-range mating calls that attract distant females, a major new study has shown. (2017-12-05)

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