Current Crime News and Events

Current Crime News and Events, Crime News Articles.
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Answer quickly to be believed
When people pause before replying to a question, even for just a few seconds, their answers are perceived to be less sincere and credible than if they had replied immediately, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2021-02-16)

The effect of natural disasters on criminal--and charitable--activity in the USA
While media has popularized a notion of widespread looting and chaos in the wake of major disasters, the researchers found that communities impacted by disasters actually experience a decrease in crime. Their article also found a marked increase in philanthropic activity amongst people that live nearby disaster areas but weren't directly affected by the disaster. (2021-02-16)

Big name corporations more likely to commit fraud
Fortune 500 firms with strong growth profiles are more prone to corporate financial securities fraud than smaller, struggling companies, according to a recent study. Researchers examined more than 250 U.S. public corporations involved in fraud identified in SEC filings from 2005-2013, compared to a control sample of nonfraud firms. Trends emerged for a greater fraud risk including corporations listed in the Fortune 500, traded on the NYSE and that had strong growth imperatives. (2021-02-02)

Study: Sudden police layoffs in one US city associated with increases in crime
A new study examined the effects on crime of budget shortfalls in two New Jersey cities--one of which laid off more than 10 percent of its police force while the other averted layoffs. The study found that the police layoffs were associated with significant increases in overall crime, violent crime, and property crime. (2021-01-27)

Climate impacts on health and urban areas: Heatwaves and death rate
Heat does not kill in the same way everywhere. Urban planning, social cohesion, traffic, crime: the urban and social context can worsen the vulnerability of individuals to heatwaves, with differences even within the same city. An analysis of the scientific literature conducted by CMCC@Ca'Foscari. (2021-01-15)

UCI study first to link disparities and 'pharmacy deserts' in California
In the United States, Black, Latino and low-income communities have historically lacked nearby access to pharmacy services. To provide the first record of these 'pharmacy deserts' in Los Angeles County, a University of California, Irvine study identified communities where the nearest pharmacy was at least one mile away. (2021-01-06)

Sights set on curbing gun crime
A community or sub-culture encouraging young men's exposure and obsession with guns - as well as ready access to firearms and drugs - can make gun violence 'all too easy', with Flinders University experts promoting a new direction on managing the global problem. Flinders criminologists conclude that the need to 'dematerialise' the attraction to gun has ''never been greater'' than ''in a post-COVID-19 world in which guns have gained greater salience in many countries''. (2020-12-15)

Researchers turn DNA detectives to aid rhino poaching prosecutions with forensic evidence
Researchers at the Wildlife Institute of India (WII), have, for the first time, used unique DNA markers to provide forensic evidence for alleged poaching cases involving the Indian rhino. (2020-12-15)

Police investigators of online child abuse at risk of mental harm
Researchers at the University of Portsmouth and Solent University explored moral injury amongst child exploitation investigators and interviewed police officers from two Constabularies during a year-long study. The CREST (Centre for Research and Evidence on Security Threats) funded project asked questions relating to motivations for beginning the role, any personality changes, prior trauma, difficulties relating to their current role, coping mechanisms, moral decision making and use of professional support. (2020-12-10)

Within a hair's breadth--forensic identification of single dyed hair strand now possible
A single strand of hair in a crime scene contains many clues that can help identify a perpetrator. In a recent study, scientists at Tokyo University of Science, Japan, have combined two modern techniques, called surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence, to distinguish between different colors in individual hair strands. Both these techniques are almost non-destructive and can be conducted with portable devices, making this a promising way to get supportive evidence in forensic investigations. (2020-12-09)

Seizing military weapons does not increase violent crime nor risk police safety
More local law enforcement agencies are using military equipment, such as tear gas, armored vehicles and rubber bullets, to handle social justice protests--calling into question police militarization. (2020-12-07)

New study findings: militarizing local police does not reduce crime
New research shows that the militarization of local law enforcement through weapons, armored vehicles, combat attire, office equipment and other items provided by the Department of Defense does not reduce crime. Additionally, researchers found incomplete records and discrepancies in the federal government's tracking of surplus military equipment, or SME, issued to local law enforcement agencies. (2020-12-07)

Undocumented immigrants far less likely to commit crimes in U.S. than citizens
Crime rates among undocumented immigrants are just a fraction of those of their U.S.-born neighbors, according to a first-of-its-kind analysis of Texas arrest and conviction records. (2020-12-07)

Barriers to police investigations into widespread financial crime unveiled
A majority of police detectives in England and Wales investigating financial crime do not have sufficient knowledge to build a successful case. That's the finding of new research from the University of Portsmouth, looking into why results of such investigations vary so widely, especially when the crimes account for half of all criminal activity in the UK. (2020-11-24)

Ethnic minorities face rising disparity in homicide risk across England and Wales
Calculations now familiar from coronavirus coverage - cases per 100,000 people - applied to ethnicity and homicide victimisation in the UK for the first time. So far this century, Black Britons have been over five and a half times more likely to become murder victims than White British people. Researchers call on ONS and police forces to calculate and present more 'meaningful' crime data to aid prevention and public understanding. (2020-11-17)

Study: Jumps in elementary school violence linked to increased student transfers
New research finds that student exposure to violent crime in urban elementary schools is linked to higher transfer rates, with students ineligible for free- or reduced-price meals and students from safer neighborhoods more likely to leave than their less advantaged peers. The study was published today in the American Educational Research Journal, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association. (2020-11-17)

Why untraceable cryptocurrencies are here to stay
Financial regulators have a wait and see approach to decentralized privacy-preserving cryptocurrencies, letting them mature before deciding how to regulate them. Yet they assume there will be some way for oversight in the future to track extraordinary transactions linked to organized crime, terrorism financing and money laundering. (2020-11-17)

Corporate fraud may lead to neighborhood financial crimes
After a major corporate fraud case hits a city, financially motivated neighborhood crimes like robbery and theft increase in the area, a new study suggests. Researchers from The Ohio State University and Indiana University found that the revelation of corporate accounting misconduct is linked to about a 2.3 percent increase in local financially motivated crimes in the following year. (2020-11-16)

Demolishing abandoned houses does not reduce nearby crime, study finds
A study conducted by the University of Kansas compared crime rates near abandoned houses that were demolished and similar properties that were not, finding no reduction in violent or property crime near those torn down. Findings suggest simply demolishing dangerous houses is not enough to reduce crime. (2020-11-10)

Significant psychological toll from New Zealand COVID-19 lockdown
Research has confirmed the nationwide Alert Level 4 COVID-19 lockdown had a significant toll on New Zealanders' well-being, especially for younger people - but the results were not all negative. (2020-11-09)

Do black lives matter protests impact fatal police interactions and crime?
A new analysis of nine years of nationwide data examines the impacts of the Black Lives Matter movement on fatal interactions with police, and on crime and arrests. (2020-10-21)

Sanctuary policies protect immigrants but don't threaten public safety
Stanford researcher David Hausman analyzed ICE deportations data for 296 large counties combined with FBI crime data. Sanctuary counties experienced a significant decrease in deportations in the months after sanctuary policies were adopted. Deportations of individuals with violent convictions did not decrease, but deportation of individuals without convictions decreased by about half. Sanctuary policies did not have a significant effect on crime rates or the rate at which police arrested individuals for reported crimes. (2020-10-19)

A new toolkit for capturing how COVID-19 impacts crime
A new set of assessment tools shows promise in capturing how the COVID-19 pandemic affects patterns of criminal activity. Hervé Borrion of University College London, U.K., and colleagues present this toolkit in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on October 14. (2020-10-14)

ideas42 and University of Chicago Crime Lab challenge assumptions about missed court dates
Behavioral design nonprofit ideas42 and the University of Chicago Crime Lab announced the publication of their new joint paper, Using Behavioral Nudges to Reduce Failure to Appear in Court in Science Magazine. The paper's results demonstrate that redesigning New York City's summons form to make it simpler and clearer reduced failure to appear rates by 13%, and sending text message reminders reduced failure to appear rates by 21%. (2020-10-08)

Social media postings linked to hate crimes
A new paper in the Journal of the European Economic Association, published by Oxford University Press, explores the connection between social media and hate crimes. The researchers combined methods from applied microeconomics with text analysis tools to investigate how negative rhetoric about refugees on social media may have contributed to hate crimes against refugees in Germany between 2015 and 2017. (2020-10-06)

UB study finds no apparent link between undocumented immigration and crime
An analysis by a University at Buffalo-led team using two estimates of undocumented immigration suggests that, on average, this population reduced or had no effect on crime in 154 U.S. metropolitan areas studied, including places such as New York City, Chicago and Las Vegas. (2020-10-05)

Tracking sea turtle egg traffickers with GPS-enabled decoy eggs
By placing 3D-printed and GPS-enabled decoy sea turtle eggs into nests on the beach, it's possible to gather key evidence needed to expose rampant illegal trade of the eggs, suggests a study publishing in the journal Current Biology on October 5, 2020. The researchers specifically tested how well the decoy eggs work and their safety for the endangered turtles. (2020-10-05)

As domestic violence spikes, many victims and their children have nowhere to live
COVID-19 has left many victims of domestic violence facing difficulties feeding their children and accessing services for safe housing, transportation and childcare once they leave shelters, according to a Rutgers study published in the journal Violence Against Women. (2020-09-14)

Privatized prisons lead to more inmates, longer sentences, study finds
WSU study finds that when states turn to private prisons, the number of criminals incarcerated rises and the length of sentences increases. Private prisons lead to an average increase of 178 new prisoners per million population per year. At an average cost of $60 per day per prisoner, that costs states between $1.9 to $10.6 million per year, if all those additional prisoners are in private prisons. (2020-09-14)

Blood breakdown product commandeers important enzyme
The hemoglobin in the red blood cells ensures that our body cells receive sufficient oxygen. When the blood pigment is broken down, 'heme' is produced, which in turn can influence the protein cocktail in the blood. Researchers at the University of Bonn have now discovered in complex detective work that the 'activated protein C' (APC) can be commandeered by heme. At the same time, APC can also reduce the toxic effect of heme. (2020-09-04)

Warning witnesses of the possibility of misinformation helps protect their memory accuracy
Warning about the threat of misinformation -- before or after an event -- significantly reduces the negative impact of misinformation on memory, according to research at Tufts University. The findings could have important implications for improving the accuracy of everyday memory and eyewitness testimony. (2020-08-31)

All that glitters is not gold: Misuse of AI by big tech can harm developing countries
The debate on the risks and benefits of Artificial Intelligence (AI) is still ongoing, but one thing is certain: without appropriate regulatory measures, AI is potentially dangerous. A recent study explores how AI can be a threat to the society, especially developing nations, if left unregulated. The study also talks about why AI should comply with the Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations, to ensure that it benefits the society as a whole. (2020-08-27)

Punitive sentencing led to higher incarceration rates throughout adulthood for certain birth cohorts in North Carolina
A new study using 45 years of incarceration data from North Carolina suggests an alternative explanation to the current rates of incarceration: this pattern is driven by the prolonged involvement in the criminal justice system by members of Generation X, who came of age during the 1980s and early 1990s. (2020-08-24)

In Iraq, mixed-religion soccer teams helped build social cohesion, healed wounds after war
A new study in Science used sports to promote reconciliation between Christians, who were displaced and persecuted under ISIS in Iraq, and their Muslim neighbors. Players who'd been randomly assigned to have Muslim players on their teams changed attitudes, which persisted even after the season ended. However, the changes only related to Muslim league players, and did not extend off the field. (2020-08-13)

Small towns have highest risk of intimate partner violence
Despite common perceptions that big cities have more violence, women living in small towns are most at risk of violence from current or former partners. The study analyzed the responses of more than 570,000 women from the National Crime Victimization Survey from 1994-2015. Women from small towns were 27% more likely to be victims of intimate partner violence than women from the center of big cities and 42% more likely than suburban women. (2020-08-06)

'Deepfakes' ranked as most serious AI crime threat
Fake audio or video content has been ranked by experts as the most worrying use of artificial intelligence in terms of its potential applications for crime or terrorism, according to a new UCL report. (2020-08-03)

UMD addresses African vulture poisoning with global disease and biodiversity implications
In a new paper published in Global Ecology and Conservation, University of Maryland researchers collaborated with international leaders in wildlife conservation to produce recommendations for vulture poisoning control in Southern Africa. Vultures act as nature's most critical scavengers, working as ecosystem garbage disposals and disinfectors to maintain animal, environmental, and human health. Findings highlight the issue from a conservation and criminology perspective, recommending a more coordinated and holistic approach to regulation, education, and enforcement. (2020-07-23)

Anti-Asian hate crime during the COVID-19 pandemic
Since the outbreak of COVID-19 in Wuhan, China, the United States has seen a surge of Asian Americans reporting racially motivated hate crimes. Earlier this month, University of Colorado Denver School of Public Affairs professor Angela Gover, PhD, along with researchers from Iowa State University and RTI International, published a research paper outlining how COVID-19 has enabled the spread of racism and created national insecurity, fear of foreigners, and general xenophobia. (2020-07-21)

Keeping innocent people out of jail using the science of perception
People wrongfully accused of a crime often wait years -- if ever -- to be exonerated. Many of these wrongfully accused cases stem from unreliable eyewitness testimony. Now, Salk scientists have identified a new way of presenting a lineup to an eyewitness that could improve the likelihood that the correct suspect is identified and reduce the number of innocent people sentenced to jail. (2020-07-14)

Scientists at USC and other institutions develop new method to improve police lineups
For the first time, scientists have developed a way to measure the reliability of an eyewitness trying to pick a culprit from a police lineup. The findings could help reduce the number of innocent people convicted of crimes. (2020-07-14)

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