Current Cryptography News and Events

Current Cryptography News and Events, Cryptography News Articles.
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Physicists develop record-breaking source for single photons
Researchers at the University of Basel and Ruhr University Bochum have developed a source of single photons that can produce billions of these quantum particles per second. With its record-breaking efficiency, the photon source represents a new and powerful building-block for quantum technologies. (2021-01-28)

A display that completely blocks off counterfeits
POSTECH research team led by Professor Junsuk Rho develops nanostructures capable of polarized optical encryption. (2021-01-21)

NUST MISIS scientists develop fastest-ever quantum random number generator
An international research team has developed a fast and affordable quantum random number generator. The device created by scientists from NUST MISIS, Russian Quantum Center, University of Oxford, Goldsmiths, University of London and Freie Universität Berlin produces randomness at a rate of 8.05 gigabits per second, which makes it the fastest random number generator of its kind. The study has been published in Physical Review X. (2021-01-20)

Studying chaos with one of the world's fastest cameras
Lihong Wang demonstrates how his ultrafast camera technology might aid in the study of unpredictable systems. (2021-01-13)

Entangling electrons with heat
Quantum entanglement is key for next-generation computing and communications technology, Aalto researchers can now produce it using temperature differences. (2021-01-08)

FEFU scientists explain how to storage cipher data in magnetic skyrmions
Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) with international collaborators propose direct magnetic writing of skyrmions, i.e. magnetic quasiparticles, and skyrmion lattices, within which it is possible to encode, transmit, process information, and produce topological patterns with a resolution of less than 100 nanometers. This brings closer miniaturized post-silicon electronics, new topological cryptography techniques, and green data centers, reducing the load on the Earth's ecosystem significantly. A related article appears in ACS Nano. (2020-11-30)

New tool detects unsafe security practices in Android apps
Computer scientists at Columbia Engineering have shown for the first time that it is possible to analyze how thousands of Android apps use cryptography without needing to have the apps' actual codes. The team's new tool, CRYLOGGER, can tell when an Android app uses cryptography incorrectly--it detects the so-called 'cryptographic misuses' in Android apps. When given a list of rules that should be followed for secure cryptography, CRYLOGGER detects violations of these rules. (2020-11-09)

A question of reality
Physicist Reinhold Bertlmann of the University of Vienna, Austria has published a review of the work of his late long-term collaborator John Stewart Bell of CERN, Geneva in EPJ H. This review, 'Real or Not Real: that is the question', explores Bell's inequalities and his concepts of reality and explains their relevance to quantum information and its applications. (2020-09-24)

Single photons from a silicon chip
Quantum technology holds great promise: Quantum computers are expected to revolutionize database searches, AI systems, and computational simulations. Today already, quantum cryptography can guarantee secure data transfer, albeit with limitations. The greatest possible compatibility with current silicon-based electronics will be a key advantage. And that is precisely where physicists at HZDR and TU Dresden have made progress: The team has designed a silicon-based light source to generate single photons that propagate well in glass fibers. (2020-09-15)

Popular messenger services are extremely insecure
Researchers from the Technical University of Darmstadt and the University of Würzburg show that popular mobile messengers expose personal data via discovery services that allow users to find contacts based on phone numbers from their address book. (2020-09-15)

Randomness theory could hold key to internet security
In a new paper, Cornell Tech researchers identified a problem that holds the key to whether all encryption can be broken -- as well as a surprising connection to a mathematical concept that aims to define and measure randomness. (2020-07-27)

Experimental optimal verification of entangled states using local measurements
USTC modified the original proposal to be robust to practical imperfections, and experimentally implement a scalable quantum state verification on two-qubit and four-qubit entangled states with nonadaptive local measurements. The research results were published in Physical Review Letters on July 17th. (2020-07-24)

Ben-Gurion University researchers determine how to accurately pinpoint malicious drone operators
When tested in simulated drone paths, the model was able to predict the operator location with 78% accuracy. The next step in the project would be to repeat this experiment with data captured from real drones. (2020-07-08)

No keys to the kingdom: New single sign-on algorithm provides superior privacy
Single sign-on systems (SSOs) allow us to login to multiple websites and applications using a single username and password combination. But these are third party systems usually handled by Big Tech companies who have been reported to gather and leak personal information without user consent. Now, researchers from Tokyo University of Science, Japan, have developed a new and secure single sign-on algorithm that eliminates all these problems. (2020-06-29)

Spin-dependent processes in the 2D material hexagonal boron nitride
Quantum technology was once considered to be something very expensive and available only to the largest research centers. However, in our days it's widely used in many applications, and one of them is magnetic resonance imaging. (2020-05-06)

Identifying light sources using artificial intelligence
Identifying sources of light plays an important role in the development of many photonic technologies, such as lidar, remote sensing, and microscopy. Traditionally, identifying light sources as diverse as sunlight, laser radiation, or molecule fluorescence has required millions of measurements, particularly in low-light environments, which limits the realistic implementation of quantum photonic technologies. Researchers demonstrated a smart quantum technology that enables a dramatic reduction in the number of measurements required to identify light sources. (2020-05-05)

Speeding-up quantum computing using giant atomic ions
An international team of researchers have found a new way to speed up quantum computing that could pave the way for huge leaps forward in computer processing power. (2020-04-15)

Future quantum computers may pose threat to today's most-secure communications
Quantum computers that are exponentially faster than any of our current classical computers and are capable of code-breaking applications could be available in 12 to 15 years, posing major risks to the security of current communications systems, according to a new RAND Corporation report. The security risks posed by this new category of computers can be managed if the US government acts quickly, and a centrally coordinated, whole-of-nation approach is the best way to manage those challenges. (2020-04-09)

Cryptographic 'tag of everything' could protect the supply chain
To combat supply chain counterfeiting, which can cost companies billions of dollars annually, MIT researchers have invented a cryptographic ID tag that's small enough to fit on virtually any product and verify its authenticity. (2020-02-20)

New security system to revolutionise communications privacy
A new uncrackable security system created by researchers at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), the University of St Andrews and the Center for Unconventional Processes of Sciences (CUP Sciences) is set to revolutionize communications privacy. (2019-12-20)

Counting photons is now routine enough to need standards
NIST has taken a step toward enabling universal standards for single-photon detectors (SPDs), which are becoming increasingly important in science and industry. (2019-12-20)

Could mathematics help to better treat cancer?
Impaired information processing may prevent cells from perceiving their environment correctly; they then start acting in an uncontrolled way and this can lead to the development of cancer. To better understand how impaired information transmission influences the activity of diseased cells, researchers (UNIGE) are going beyond the field of biology. They propose to examine cellular communication in the light of information theory, a mathematical theory more commonly used in computer science. (2019-10-29)

Super light dampers for low tones
A team of Empa acoustic researchers has built macroscopic crystal structures that use internal ro-tation to attenuate the propagation of waves. The method makes it possible to build very light and stiff materials that can also 'swallow' low frequencies very well, as they report in the journal Nature Communications. (2019-10-15)

Quantum physics: Ménage à trois photon-style
When two photons become entangled, the quantum state of the first will correlate perfectly with the quantum state of the second. Today, researchers (UNIGE and IPM) have proved that 3 pairs of entangled photons allow for a new form of quantum correlation in theory. When the scientists forced 2 photons from separate pairs to become entangled, the connection was also made with their twin photon present elsewhere in the network, forming a highly-correlated triangle. (2019-10-15)

Johns Hopkins researchers discover material that could someday power quantum computer
Quantum computers with the ability to perform complex calculations, encrypt data more securely and more quickly predict the spread of viruses, may be within closer reach thanks to a new discovery by Johns Hopkins researchers. (2019-10-10)

Can we peek at Schrodinger's cat without disturbing it?
Quantum physics is difficult and explaining it even more so. Associate Professor Holger F. Hofmann from Hiroshima University and Kartik Patekar from the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay have tried to solve one of the biggest puzzles in quantum physics: How to measure the quantum system without changing it? (2019-10-02)

Light in a new light
In a paper published today in Nature's NPJ Quantum Information, Omar Magaña-Loaiza, assistant professor in the Louisiana State University Department of Physics & Astronomy, and his team of researchers describe a noteworthy step forward in the quantum manipulation and control of light. (2019-09-27)

New research brings scientists one step closer to a fully functioning quantum computer
Quantum computing has the potential to revolutionize technology, medicine, and science by providing faster and more efficient processors, sensors, and communication devices. But transferring information and correcting errors within a quantum system remains a challenge. In a paper in Nature, researchers from the University of Rochester and Purdue University demonstrate their method of relaying information by transferring the state of electrons. The research brings scientists one step closer to creating fully functional quantum computers. (2019-09-25)

New method for detecting quantum states of electrons
Researchers in the Quantum Dynamics Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) devised a new method -- called image charge detection -- to detect electrons' transitions to quantum states. Electrons can serve as quantum bits, the smallest unit of quantum information; these bits are foundational to larger computational systems. Quantum computers may be used to understand the mechanism of superconductivity, cryptography, artificial intelligence, among other applications. (2019-09-17)

Spreading light over quantum computers
Scientists at Linköping University have shown how a quantum computer really works and have managed to simulate quantum computer properties in a classical computer. 'Our results should be highly significant in determining how to build quantum computers', says Professor Jan-Åke Larsson. (2019-09-03)

Tel Aviv U and Technion researchers wrest control of one of world's most secure PLCs
Cybersecurity researchers at Tel Aviv University and the Technion Institute of Technology have discovered critical vulnerabilities in the Siemens S7 Simatic programmable logic controller (PLC), one of the world's most secure PLCs, which are used to run industrial processes. (2019-08-08)

Quantum entanglement in chemical reactions? Now there's a way to find out
For the first time, scientists have developed a practical way to measure quantum entanglement in chemical reactions. (2019-08-02)

$4.6 million award creates program to train cybersecurity professionals
A five-year, $4.63 million award from the National Science Foundation will enable a multi-disciplinary team of researchers at the University of Arkansas to create a program to recruit, educate and train the next generation of cybersecurity professionals. (2019-07-16)

Secure quantum communications in the microwave range for the first time
Mikel Sanz, of the Physical Chemistry Department of UPV/EHU, leads the theoretical group for an experiment published by the prestigious magazine, Nature Communications. The experiment has managed to prepare a remote quantum state; i.e., absolutely secure communication was established with another, physically separated quantum computer for the first time in the microwave regime. This new technology may bring about a revolution in the next few years. (2019-06-19)

Automated cryptocode generator is helping secure the web
In a paper presented at the recent IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, MIT researchers detail a system that, for the first time, automatically generates optimized cryptography code that's usually written by hand. Deployed in early 2018, the system is now being widely used by Google and other tech firms. (2019-06-18)

A new hope of quantum computers for factorizations of RSA with a thousand-fold excess
Universal quantum computers are still in its infancy that cannot achieve practical applications (code-cracking) in near term. Other than Shor algorithm, novel quantum computing ways for breaking public-key cryptosystem are required. The dedicated quantum computer, D-Wave machine, can find approximate answers for exponential-level problems in computer science, which is intractable for classical counterparts. Thus, the new fire of development will be soon lit in the area of practical code-cracking in a new quantum computing way. (2019-04-03)

ANU research set to shake up space missions
A new study from the Australian National University has found a number of 2D materials can not only withstand being sent into space, but potentially thrive in the harsh conditions. (2019-03-14)

Trading cryptocurrency is problematic for regular gamblers, Rutgers study says
Researchers at the Center for Gambling Studies at Rutgers University-New Brunswick have found a link between frequently trading cryptocurrency -- a digital and virtual currency -- and problem gambling. (2019-03-08)

Yale researchers create a 'universal entangler' for new quantum tech
One of the key concepts in quantum physics is entanglement, in which two or more quantum systems become so inextricably linked that their collective state can't be determined by observing each element individually. Now Yale researchers have developed a ''universal entangler'' that can link a variety of encoded particles on demand. The discovery represents a powerful new mechanism with potential uses in quantum computing, cryptography, and quantum communications. (2019-02-27)

Is quantum computing scalable?
Debbie Leung, a fellow in CIFAR's Quantum Information Science program and a faculty member at the University of Waterloo's Institute for Quantum Computing, will discuss the challenges of scaling quantum computing at the AAAS meeting on Feb. 16. (2019-02-16)

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