Current Curiosity News and Events

Current Curiosity News and Events, Curiosity News Articles.
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Time perception and sense of touch: a new connection
The percept of time relates to the sense of touch. A new SISSA study ''A sensory integration account for time perception'' published in PLOS Computational Biology uncovers this connection. The main clue leading to the new theory is that the perceived duration of a vibration increases not only in relation to actual elapsed time but also in relation to the intensity of the vibration. (2021-02-10)

Rocks show Mars once felt like Iceland
A comparison of chemical and climate weathering of sedimentary rock in Mars' Gale Crater indicate the region's mean temperature billions of years ago was akin to current conditions on Iceland. (2021-01-20)

Of the honey bee dance
Honey bees are unique in that they not only alert their nestmates but have also evolved a symbolic communication in the form of a dance - a waggle dance. (2021-01-18)

Hunters and busybodies: Researchers use Wikipedia to measure different types of curiosity
In the past, research on curiosity has mostly tried to quantify it, rather than to understand the different ways it can be expressed. Now, a new study led by researchers at Penn and American University uses Wikipedia browsing as a method for describing curiosity styles. Using a branch of mathematics known as graph theory, their analysis of curiosity opens doors for using it as a tool to improve learning and life satisfaction. (2021-01-12)

Field geology at Mars' equator points to ancient megaflood
Floods of unimaginable magnitude once washed through Gale Crater on Mars' equator around 4 billion years ago - a finding that hints at the possibility that life may have existed there, according to data collected by NASA's Curiosity rover and analyzed in joint project by scientists from Jackson State University, Cornell University, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the University of Hawaii. (2020-11-20)

Sixty-year old cohort study reveals adolescent value predicts wellbeing in older age
Subjective wellbeing leads to better health, but we did not know what in our younger years determines our wellbeing in old age. Researchers at the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science have demonstrated that adolescents who valued their interests and curiosity had higher wellbeing in old age from a 60-year-old cohort in the UK. We additionally found that adolescents with low self-control who valued money and steady jobs had significantly lower wellbeing in old age. (2020-11-11)

Stem cells: new insights for future regenerative medicine approaches
The study published in Open Biology unravels important data for a better understanding of the process of division in stem cells and for the development of safer ways to use them in medicine. (2020-10-28)

Now you see it, now you don't: Hidden colors discovered by coincidence
Scientists in Australia have stumbled across an unusual way to observe colour that had previously gone unnoticed. An example of a process called scattering, the effect occurs in some materials when light interference combines with strong electric fields. The findings, which have been published in the journal Advanced Optical Materials, have expanded our understanding of the behaviour and properties of light, and could also have practical applications in sensing technology and security devices. (2020-10-14)

Protein causes mutations that lead to breast cancer cell aggression
In her previous research, University of Alberta biochemist Ing Swie Goping identified that the protein, BCL-2 interacting killer (BIK), was associated with relapses in breast cancer patients. In a new study published in the journal Cell Death and Disease, she found that the problem lies with the cellular 'self-destruct' process of apoptosis. (2020-09-08)

Novel approach improves graphene-based supercapacitors
An efficient in situ pathway to generate and attach oxygen functional groups to graphitic electrodes for supercapacitors by inducing hydrolysis of water molecules within the gel electrolyte. (2020-08-03)

First Alaskan juvenile predator fossil adds insight to dino migration
The discovery of the first juvenile dromaeosaurid lower jaw bone on the North Slope of Alaska supports a growing theory that some Cretaceous Arctic dinosaurs did not migrate with the seasons but were year-round residents, according to new research by SMU paleontologist Anthony Fiorillo. The research was published today in PLOS ONE. Prior to this find, only tiny dromaeosaurid teeth have been discovered in this region. (2020-07-08)

A different slant of light
Giant clams manipulate light to assist their symbiotic partner. (2020-07-05)

NASA's Curiosity rover finds clues to chilly ancient Mars buried in rocks
By studying the chemical elements on Mars today -- including carbon and oxygen -- scientists can work backwards to piece together the history of a planet that once had the conditions necessary to support life. (2020-05-19)

Proteins may halt the severe cytokine storms seen in COVID-19 patients
A team of MIT researchers has developed specialized antibody-like receptor proteins that they believe could soak up the excess cytokines produced during a cytokine storm. This excessive immune response, sometimes seen in Covid-19 patients, can be fatal. (2020-04-16)

Engineers crack 58-year-old puzzle on way to quantum breakthrough
A mishap during an experiment led UNSW quantum computing researchers to crack a mystery that had stood since 1961. (2020-03-11)

Is life a game of chance?
To help answer one of the great existential questions -- how did life begin? -- a new study combines biological and cosmological models. Professor Tomonori Totani from the Department of Astronomy looked at how life's building blocks could spontaneously form in the universe -- a process known as abiogenesis. (2020-03-05)

Finding genetic cancer risks
As part of the Pan-Cancer project, EMBL scientists have examined whole patient and cancer genomes in the search for genetic factors that influence cancer development. Their goal was to characterise and study heritable, or germline, genetic variation in genomes of cancer patients. (2020-02-05)

Cybercrime: Internet erodes teenage impulse controls
Many teenagers are struggling to control their impulses on the internet, in a scramble for quick thrills and a sense of power online, potentially increasing their risks of becoming cyber criminals. (2020-01-21)

Developing a technique to study past Martian climate
Joanna Clark , a University of Houston doctoral student has received a $285,000 grant from NASA to develop a technique that could one day be used to better understand past climate conditions on Mars. (2019-12-17)

Ohio University entomologist: Photos show evidence of life on Mars
As scientists scramble to determine whether there is life on Mars, Ohio University Professor Emeritus William Romoser's research shows that we already have the evidence. (2019-11-19)

With Mars methane mystery unsolved, curiosity serves scientists a new one: Oxygen
For the first time in the history of space exploration, scientists have measured the seasonal changes in the gases that fill the air directly above the surface of Gale Crater on Mars. (2019-11-12)

Research suggests fumigants have very low long-term impact on soil health
It started with curiosity. How does a fumigant, commonly used for nematode management in potato cropping systems, influence soil microbial communities? To explore this question, scientists at Colorado State University and Oregon State University used high-throughput sequencing techniques to investigate changes in soil bacterial and fungal community structure in response to the application of 1,3-Dichloropropene (1,3-D) in Pacific Northwest potato production fields. Their research found that the fumigant had very minor effects. (2019-11-07)

Only half of US children get enough sleep during the week
Only 48% of school age children in the United States get 9 hours of sleep most weeknights, according to new research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2019 National Conference & Exhibition in New Orleans. Those who do, the study suggests, are significantly more likely to show a positive outlook toward school and other signs of 'childhood flourishing,' a measure of behavioral and social well-being. (2019-10-25)

New design strategy can help improve layered superconducting materials
Tokyo, Japan - Scientists from Tokyo Metropolitan University have created a new layered superconducting material with a conducting layer made of bismuth, silver, tin, sulfur and selenium. The conducting layer features four distinct sublayers; by introducing more elements, they were able to achieve unparalleled customizability and a higher ''critical temperature'' below which superconductivity is observed, a key objective of superconductor research. Their design strategy may be applied to engineer new and improved superconducting materials. (2019-10-12)

New research analyzes video game player engagement
In the video game industry, the ability for gaming companies to track and respond to gamers' post-purchase play opens up new opportunities to enhance gamer engagement and retention and increase video game revenue. (2019-09-25)

A curiosity-driven genetic discovery that should impact cancer treatments
A team of geneticists with a desire to understand the inner workings of genes implicated in cellular identity has discovered new biological targets that may help devise alternative therapies for cancers that are becoming resistant to existing drugs. (2019-09-11)

Weather on ancient Mars: Warm with occasional rain, turning cold
A new study of conditions on Mars indicates that the climate 3 to 4 billion years ago was warm enough to provoke substantial rainstorms and flowing water, followed by a longer cold period where the water froze. This may have implications on the conditions for the development of life on Mars (2019-08-19)

Using an embryonic pause to save the date
A date palm seedling can pause its development to boost its resilience before emerging into the harsh desert environment. (2019-07-08)

How information is like snacks, money, and drugs -- to your brain
A new study by researchers at UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business has found that information acts on the brain's dopamine-producing reward system in the same way as money or food. The study is the first to demonstrate a common neural code for information and money. (2019-06-19)

Texas A&M researcher makes breakthrough discovery in stretchable electronics materials
With a wide range of healthcare, energy and military applications, stretchable electronics are revered for their ability to be compressed, twisted and conformed to uneven surfaces without losing functionality. (2019-05-29)

What we think we know -- but might not -- pushes us to learn more
Our doubts about what we think we know pique our curiosity and motivate us to learn more, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley. (2019-05-23)

How the cytoplasm separates from the yolk
The segregation of yolk from the surrounding cytoplasm in the very early fish embryo is a key process for the development of the fish larva. To identify its underlying mechanisms, biologists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) teamed up with their colleagues from theoretical physics. The discovery: Actin dynamics in the bulk of the cell drive phase segregation in zebrafish oocytes. (2019-05-09)

URI researchers: Offshore wind farm increased tourism on Block Island
Researchers at the University of Rhode Island who analyzed AirBnB rental data before and after construction of the Block Island Wind Farm have found that, contrary to some concerns, the turbines have increased tourism on the island. (2019-05-06)

Specialized plant cells regain stem-cell features to heal wounds
If plants are injured, cells adjacent to the wound fill the gaps with their daughter cells. However, which cells divide to do the healing and how they manage to produce cells that match the cell type of the missing tissue has been unclear. Scientists from the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have now shown that to correctly replace dead cells, neighbors to the inside of the wound re-activate their stem cell programs. (2019-05-02)

Cosmic dust reveals new insights on the formation of solar system
The study of a tiny grain of stardust -- older than our solar system -- is shining new light on how planetary systems are formed. Alongside planetary scientists at the University of Arizona, the grain was studied at the atomic-level by University of Toronto Engineering professor Jane Howe. (2019-04-29)

Living room conservation: Gaming & virtual reality for insect and ecosystem conservation
Gaming and virtual reality could bridge the gap between urban societies and nature, thereby paving the way to insect conservation by the means of education and participation. This is what an interdisciplinary team at Florida International University strive to achieve by developing a virtual reality game (desktop version also available) dedicated to insect and plant species. Focused on imperiled butterflies, their innovative idea: Butterfly World 1.0, is described in the open-access journal Rethinking Ecology. (2019-04-18)

Google searches reveal popular bird species
Cross-referencing a decade of Google searches and citizen science observations, researchers have determined which of 621 North American bird species are currently the most popular and which characteristics of species drive human interest. Study findings have just been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2019-04-15)

Kennedy Krieger research scientist explores Leonardo da Vinci's knowledge of the brain
Jonathan Pevsner, PhD, professor and research scientist at the Kennedy Krieger Institute, wrote an article featured in the April edition of The Lancet titled, 'Leonardo da Vinci's studies of the brain.' In the piece, Pevsner highlights the exquisite drawings and curiosity, dedication and scientific rigor that led Leonardo to make penetrating insights into how the brain functions. (2019-04-11)

Research develops top tips to foster better relationships between scientists and business
University researchers and industry practitioners have developed lists of 'top tips' for businesses and academics to foster better relationships that could potentially benefit all parties. (2019-03-21)

New clue in curious case of cassowary casque
A team of Australian scientists has completed research that could help solve a 200-year-old mystery surrounding an iconic Australian bird. (2019-02-13)

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