Current Cuttlefish News and Events

Current Cuttlefish News and Events, Cuttlefish News Articles.
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Resilience to climate change?
A recent study examined the effects of acidic water on octopuses, potentially bringing new insight into both how our activities impact the world around us, and the way that world is adapting in response. (2021-01-13)

3D-printed smart gel changes shape when exposed to light
Inspired by the color-changing skin of cuttlefish, octopuses and squids, Rutgers engineers have created a 3D-printed smart gel that changes shape when exposed to light, becomes ''artificial muscle'' and may lead to new military camouflage, soft robotics and flexible displays. The engineers also developed a 3D-printed stretchy material that can reveal colors when light changes, according to their study in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. (2021-01-05)

Touch and taste? It's all in the tentacles
Scientists identified a novel family of sensors in the first layer of cells inside the suction cups that have adapted to react and detect molecules that don't dissolve well in water. The research suggests these sensors, called chemotactile receptors, use these molecules to help the animal figure out what it's touching and whether that object is prey. (2020-10-29)

Researchers find cuttlebone's microstructure sits at a 'sweet spot'
Ling Li has a lesson in one of his mechanical engineering courses on how brittle materials like calcium carbonate behave under stress. In it, he takes a piece of chalk composed of the compound and snaps it in half to show his students the edge of one of the broken pieces. The break is blunt and straight. (2020-09-11)

This cuttlefish is flamboyant on special occasions only!
The flashy Flamboyant Cuttlefish is among the most famous of the cephalopods (octopus, squid, and cuttlefish) - but it is widely misunderstood by its legions of fans. A new paper from the Roger Hanlon laboratory at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, sets the record straight. (2020-08-19)

First gene knockout in a cephalopod is achieved at Marine Biological Laboratory
A team at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) has achieved the first gene knockout in a cephalopod using the squid Doryteuthis pealeii, an exceptionally important research organism in biology for nearly a century. The milestone study is reported in the July 30 issue of Current Biology. The team used CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing to knock out a pigmentation gene in squid embryos, which eliminated pigmentation in the eye and in skin cells (chromatophores) with high efficiency. (2020-07-30)

Great white shark diet surprises scientists
The first-ever detailed analysis of the diet of great white sharks has shown they spend more time feeding at the seafloor than many would have expected. (2020-06-07)

New genetic editing powers discovered in squid
Revealing yet another super-power in the skillful squid, scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory have discovered that squid massively edit their own genetic instructions not only within the nucleus of their neurons, but also within the axon -- the long, slender neural projections that transmit electrical impulses to other neurons. This is the first time that edits to genetic information have been observed outside of the nucleus of an animal cell (2020-03-23)

Cuttlefish eat less for lunch when they know there'll be shrimp for dinner
Cuttlefish can rapidly learn from experience and adapt their eating behavior accordingly, a new study has shown. (2020-02-04)

Squid brains approach that of dogs
We are closer to understanding the incredible ability of squid to instantly camouflage themselves thanks to research from The University of Queensland. Dr. Wen-Sung Chung and Professor Justin Marshall, from UQ's Queensland Brain Institute, completed the first MRI-based mapping of the squid brain in 50 years to develop an atlas of neural connections. (2020-01-28)

The mysterious, legendary giant squid's genome is revealed
Important clues about the anatomy and evolution of the mysterious giant squid (Architeuthis dux) are revealed through publication of its full genome sequence by a University of Copenhagen-led team that includes scientist Caroline Albertin of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), Woods Hole. (2020-01-16)

Cuttlefish use depth perception similar to vertebrate vision when hunting prey
Cuttlefish viewing a movie of shrimp through 3D glasses properly positioned themselves to strike the 'prey,' suggesting these cephalopods hunt using a process called 'stereopsis' to calculate depth based on the distance between overlapping images perceived by their left and right eyes. While cuttlefish have been known to possess binocular vision, this is the first (2020-01-08)

Underwater pile driving noise causes alarm responses in squid
Exposure to underwater pile driving noise, which can be associated with the construction of docks, piers, and offshore wind farms, causes squid to exhibit strong alarm behaviors, according to a study by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) researchers published Dec. 16, 2019, in the journal Marine Pollution Bulletin. (2019-12-16)

There's a new squid in town
Researchers in OIST's Molecular Genetics Unit, in collaboration with a researcher from Australia, have identified a new species of bobtail squid inhabiting Okinawa's waters -- dubbed Euprymna brenneri. The scientists' findings, published in Communications Biology, highlight the rich biodiversity in the seas near Okinawa, and may shed light on the genes, behavior, and development of bobtail squid. (2019-12-11)

Squid pigments have antimicrobial properties
Ommochromes, the pigments that color the skin of squids and other invertebrates, could be used in the food and health sectors for their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. This is confirmed by the analyses carried out by researchers from the University of Sonora in Mexico and the Miguel Hernández University in Spain. (2019-12-05)

MBL team images the bacterial hitchhikers on plastic trash in ocean
Using an innovative microscopy method developed at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), Woods Hole, scientists have revealed the structure of the microbial communities coating microplastic trash collected from a variety of ocean sites. The team, led by Linda Amaral-Zettler (who coined the term 'Plastisphere'), Jessica Mark Welch, and Cathleen Schlundt, reports its results this week in Molecular Ecology Resources. (2019-12-02)

Scientists discover skin keeps time independent of the brain
A study published Oct. 10 in Current Biology has now found that a type of opsin known as neuropsin is expressed in the hair follicles of mice and synchronize the skin's circadian clock to the light-dark cycle, independent of the eyes or brain. Researchers now want to see if skin heals better if it's exposed to certain types of light. (2019-10-16)

Color-changing artificial 'chameleon skin' powered by nanomachines
Researchers have developed artificial 'chameleon skin' that changes colour when exposed to light and could be used in applications such as active camouflage and large-scale dynamic displays. (2019-08-21)

The cuttlefish may be flashy, but its microbiome is super simple, team reports
In a collaboration led by Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) scientist Jessica Mark Welch, scientists characterized the microbiome of the European common cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, an animal whose impressive camouflage skills and behavior have long been studied. They found its microbiome contains only two kinds of bacteria, Vibrionaceae and Piscirickettsiaceae. (2019-07-25)

Color change and behavior enable multi-colored chameleon prawns to survive
Chameleon prawns change color to camouflage themselves as the seaweed around them changes seasonally, new research shows. (2019-06-21)

Nature inspires a novel new form of computing, using light
McMaster researchers have developed a simple and highly novel form of computing by shining patterned bands of light and shadow through different facets of a polymer cube and reading the combined results that emerge. (2019-05-24)

Squid skin inspires creation of next-generation space blanket
Drawing design inspiration from the skin of stealthy sea creatures, engineers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a next-generation, adaptive space blanket that gives users the ability to control their temperature. The innovation is detailed in a study published today in Nature Communications. (2019-04-29)

Elegant interplay of coloration strategies is discovered in squid's smart skin
In the blink of an eye, the squid's skin changes color and pattern for the purpose of camouflage or sexual signaling, a virtuosic display that has long fascinated scientists. Now, collaborators from Northeastern University and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), Woods Hole, report a paradigm-shifting discovery in how specialized organs in squid skin, called chromatophores, contribute to the feat via an elegant interplay of pigmentary action and structural coloration. Their study brings bio-inspired engineers ever closer to building smart skin. (2019-03-06)

Elucidating cuttlefish camouflage
Computational image analysis of behaving cuttlefish reveals principles of control and development of a biological invisibility cloak. (2018-10-18)

New colour-generation mechanism discovered in 'rainbow' weevil
Researchers from Yale-NUS College and the University of Fribourg in Switzerland have discovered a novel color-generation mechanism in nature, which if harnessed, has the potential to create cosmetics and paints with purer and more vivid hues, screen displays that project the same true image when viewed from any angle, and even reduce the signal loss in optical fibers. (2018-09-11)

Redefining 'small-scale' fishing may help support English fisheries
Researchers at the University of York are calling for a re-evaluation of the definition of 'small-scale' fishing vessels, following a study that shows the impact of these vessels are underestimated. (2018-07-26)

Non-invasive, ultrasound-based approach for pocket depth measurements
At the 96th General Session of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the IADR Pan European Regional (PER) Congress, Jesse Jokerst, University of California, San Diego, USA gave an oral presentation titled 'Non-Invasive, Ultrasound-based Approach for Pocket Depth Measurements.' (2018-07-26)

First an alga, then a squid, enigmatic fossil is actually a fish
A fossil slab discovered in Kansas 70 years ago and twice misidentified -- first as a green alga and then as a cephalopod -- has been reinterpreted as the preserved remains of a large cartilaginous fish, the group that includes sharks and rays. In a study published in the Journal of Paleontology, American Museum of Natural History researchers describe the fishy characteristics of the animal, which lived between 70-85 million years ago. (2018-04-16)

New underwater geolocation technique takes cues from nature
Marine animals such as mantis shrimp and squid have inspired a new mode of underwater navigation that allows for greater accuracy. University of Queensland Queensland Brain Institute scientists are part of a group of researchers who have developed the technique using imaging equipment that was sensitive to polarizing light. (2018-04-04)

Evading detection by an infrared camera, octopus style
Inspired by organisms that can change the nature of their skin, such as octopuses, researchers have developed a device with tunable infrared reflectivity. The advancement could help hide objects from infrared (heat-sensing) cameras, among other applications. (2018-03-29)

Hunting squid slowed by rising carbon levels
James Cook University scientists in Australia have found high carbon dioxide levels cause squid to bungle attacks on their prey. (2018-03-21)

How the color-changing hogfish 'sees' with its skin
The hogfish can go from white to reddish in milliseconds as it adjusts to shifting conditions in the ocean. Scientists have long suspected that animals with quick-changing colors don't just rely on their eyes to tune their appearance to their surroundings -- they also sense light with their skin. But exactly how remains a mystery. A study reveals that hogfish skin senses light differently from eyes. (2018-03-12)

Squid skin could be the solution to camouflage material
Squids and octopuses are masters of disguise and humans have long envied their camouflage capabilities. A Northeastern University chemistry professor teamed up with the U.S. Army to find out how these colorful creatures do it. She turned the animal's pigment particles into spools of fiber that can be used for a number of things. (2018-02-27)

How the cuttlefish spikes out its skin: Neurological study reveals surprising control
Wouldn't it be useful to suddenly erect 3-D spikes out of your skin, hold them for an hour, then even faster retract them and swim away? Octopus and cuttlefish can do this as a camouflage tactic. A new study clarifies the neural and muscular mechanisms that underlie this extraordinary defense tactic, conducted by scientists from the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), Woods Hole, and the University of Cambridge, UK, and published in iScience. (2018-02-15)

The neuroscience of cuttlefish camouflage
Unlike squid, bottom-dwelling cuttlefish may be able to put one key aspect of their camouflage on autopilot. Marine Biological Laboratory and University of Cambridge researchers report that these cephalopods can lock in the 3-D textured shape of their dynamic skin for over an hour without nervous system input. This physiology is thought to help cuttlefish save energy as they camouflage from predators, wait for prey, or digest food. The study appears Feb. 15 in iScience. (2018-02-15)

Scientists discover the secrets behind the cuttlefish's 3-D 'invisibility cloak'
An international team of scientists has identified the neural circuits that enable cuttlefish to change their appearance in just the blink to eye -- and discovered that this is similar to the neural circuit that controls iridescence in squids. (2018-02-15)

Cuttlefish hear bow wave of looming danger
As fish and other aquatic predators loom, their arrival is heralded by a bow wave of water and scientists from the University of Oslo, Norway and the University of Southern Denmark, have discovered that cuttlefish hear the approaching water and flee in the direction that the water is moving to evade capture. (2018-01-11)

Engineers develop a programmable 'camouflaging' material inspired by octopus skin
This week, engineers at Cornell University report on their invention of stretchable surfaces with programmable 3-D texture morphing, a synthetic 'camouflaging skin' inspired by studying and modeling the real thing in octopus and cuttlefish. The engineers, along with collaborator and cephalopod biologist Roger Hanlon of the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, report on their controllable soft actuator in the Oct. 13 issue of Science. (2017-10-12)

Mixed organization of gut bacteria is revealed by microbiome imaging technology
Disruptions in the microbiome of the human gut are correlated with several diseases, including obesity and cancer. Yet little is known about the spatial organization of the nearly 1,000 bacterial species in the human gut, which can influence how the species interact with each other and with their host. In a new collaborative study, scientists established a simplified, model human gut microbiome in germ-free mice and revealed its structure through microbiome imaging technologies developed at the MBL. (2017-10-09)

Parasite revealed: New insights into dicyemida
Researchers decisively classify marine parasite Dicyemida, yielding new opportunities for understanding parasites and evolution. (2017-07-18)

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