Current Cyanobacteria News and Events

Current Cyanobacteria News and Events, Cyanobacteria News Articles.
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Biotech fit for the Red Planet
Astrobiologists from the University of Bremen show for the first time that a N2/CO2-rich low-pressure atmosphere, water, and nutrients from Mars-like dust are sufficient for Cyanobacterium-Based Life-Support Systems, making it easier for future astronauts to produce food and other resources. (2021-02-16)

Bacteria and algae get rides in clouds
Human health and ecosystems could be affected by microbes including cyanobacteria and algae that hitch rides in clouds and enter soil, lakes, oceans and other environments when it rains, according to a Rutgers co-authored study. (2021-02-16)

A surprising cycle
Hydrocarbons and petroleum are almost synonymous in environmental science. After all, oil reserves account for nearly all the hydrocarbons we encounter. But the few hydrocarbons that trace their origin to biological sources may play a larger ecological role than scientists originally suspected. (2021-02-01)

A small protein in bacteria overlooked up to now
Researchers identify an essential factor involved in the ordered recycling of phycobilisome light-harvesting structures (2021-01-29)

Development of rapid method for extraction of natural blue chromophore from cyanobacteria
A research group at Toyohashi University of Technology succeeded in developing an efficient and rapid extraction method for Phycocyanobilin (PCB) by treating cyanobacterial cells with alcohol under high-temperature and high-pressure conditions. They also demonstrated that this method can be applied to the isotopic labeling of PCB and its reconstitution with photoswitch protein. This technique is expected to lead to the development of new functional foods and medicines and the structural elucidation of various PCB-binding photoswitches. (2021-01-26)

Methods in studying cycad leaf nutrition found to be inconsistent and incomplete
Collective research to date regarding nutrients found in the leaves of contemporary cycad species has been inconsistent as far as data collection and narrow in scope, according to a University of Guam-led literature review published on Nov. 19 in Horticulturae journal. (2021-01-21)

Orange is the new 'block'
New research from Washington University in St. Louis reveals the core structure of the light-harvesting antenna of cyanobacteria or blue-green algae -- including key features that both collect energy and block excess light absorption. Scientists built a model of the large protein complex called phycobilisome that collects and transmits light energy. Phycobilisomes allow cyanobacteria to take advantage of different wavelengths of light than other photosynthetic organisms. The study, published Jan. 6, 2020 in Science Advances, yields insights relevant to future energy applications. (2021-01-06)

Modern microbes provide window into ancient ocean
Roughly two billion years ago, microorganisms called cyanobacteria fundamentally transformed the globe. Researchers are now stepping back to that pivotal moment in Earth's history. (2021-01-06)

New energy conversion layer for biosolar cells
A research team from the Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum, together with colleagues from Lisbon, has produced a semi-artificial electrode that could convert light energy into other forms of energy in biosolar cells. The technique is based on the photosynthesis protein Photosystem I from cyanobacteria. The group showed that they could couple their system with an enzyme that used the converted light energy to produce hydrogen. (2020-12-21)

Scientists found out genes involved in a compound in lichens with antiviral activity
Lichens are of great importance both ecologically and as a biological model. These organisms produce a wide range of secondary metabolites, including usnic acid, a compound with unknown biological function but which in-vitro studies have found to present antiviral, neuroprotective and anti-cancer activity. An international research team led by the Complutense University of Madrid has identified the cluster of biosynthetic genes involved in the production of this compound. (2020-12-11)

To survive asteroid impact, algae learned to hunt
Tiny, seemingly harmless ocean plants survived the darkness of the asteroid strike that killed the dinosaurs by learning a ghoulish behavior -- eating other living creatures. (2020-10-30)

Endangered trees in Guam contribute to ecosystem diversity and health
Research at the University of Guam has shown that the decomposition of leaf litter from three threatened tree species releases nitrogen and carbon into the soil for use by other plants. (2020-10-27)

Small mussels in the Baltic are getting even smaller
Blue mussels in the Baltic Sea are getting smaller with time but bigger in numbers, according to a new study from Stockholm University. Analyzing data from the last 24 years, the main reason for this appears to be changes in food quality. The type of phytoplankton that is available for blue mussels to eat can in turn be linked to our changing climate. (2020-10-27)

Repairing the photosynthetic enzyme Rubisco
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry decipher the molecular mechanism of Rubisco Activase (2020-10-20)

Artificial cyanobacterial biofilm can sustain green ethylene production for over a month
Ethylene is one of the most important and widely used organic chemicals. The research group at the University of Turku led by Associate Professor Yagut Allahverdiyeva-Rinne has designed a thin-layer artificial biofilm with embedded cyanobacterial cell factories which were specifically engineered for photosynthetic production of ''green'' ethylene. The fabricated biofilms have sustained ethylene production for up to 40 days. (2020-10-15)

FSU researchers find diverse communities comprise bacterial mats threatening coral reefs
A Florida State University research team found that cyanobacterial mats threatening the health of coral reefs are more diverse and complex than scientists previously knew. (2020-10-15)

Study finds 'missing link' in the evolutionary history of carbon-fixing protein rubisco
The discovery of a primitive form of rubisco, a photosynthetic enzyme, will help scientists understand how carbon-fixing microorganisms led to the planet's oxygenation and how modern plants evolved (2020-10-07)

Cyanobacteria as "green" catalysts in biotechnology
Researchers from TU Graz and Ruhr University Bochum show in the journal ACS Catalysis how the catalytic activity of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, can be significantly increased. This brings biotechnological and thus eco-friendly application a big step closer. (2020-10-05)

Is it one or two species? The case of the cluster anemones
Their scientific name is ''Parazoanthus axinellae'' and they are among the most fascinating corals of the Mediterranean Sea. A genetic analysis suggests they may belong to two different species and, therefore, there could be two types of cluster anemone. Researchers claim this may lead to more effective conservation strategies against the negative impact of climate change on this sea population (2020-09-29)

More than just genetic code
Researchers discover how messenger RNAs transport information to where photosynthesis takes place. (2020-09-08)

More nutrient reduction still needed to save lakes in China
Chinese people have been paying more and more attention to water safety, especially since the Wuxi 'water crisis' in Lake Taihu in 2007. However, more than 10 years after the crisis, how healthy are Chinese lakes now? (2020-09-02)

Novel technology for the selection of single photosynthetic cells
New research, published in the journal Science Advances, demonstrates how microfluidic technologies can be used to identify, isolate and propagate specific single photosynthetically active cells for fundamental industry applications and improved ecosystem understanding. (2020-09-02)

Notice me! Neglected for over a century, Black sea spider crab re-described
Even though recognised in the Mediterranean Sea, the Macropodia czernjawskii spider crab was ignored by scientists (even by its namesake, 19th-century biologist Vladimir Czernyavsky) in the regional faunal accounts of the Black Sea for more than a century. Now, scientists re-describe this, most likely, sole species of the genus to occur in the Black Sea. The finding was published in the open-access journal Zoosystematics and Evolution. (2020-09-01)

Study finds missing link in the evolutionary history of carbon-fixing protein Rubisco
A team led by researchers at UC Davis has discovered a missing link in the evolution of photosynthesis and carbon fixation. Dating back more than 2.4 billion years, a newly discovered form of the plant enzyme rubisco could give new insight into plant evolution and breeding (2020-08-31)

Tiny plants crucial for sustaining dwindling water supplies: Global analysis
Miniscule plants growing on desert soils can help drylands retain water and reduce erosion, UNSW researchers have found. (2020-07-31)

Cycad plants provide an important 'ecosystem service'
A study published in the June 2020 edition of the peer-reviewed journal Horticulturae shows that cycads, which are in decline and among the world's most threatened group of plants, provide an important service to their neighboring organisms. The study, completed by researchers from the Western Pacific Tropical Research Center at the University of Guam and the Montgomery Botanical Center in Miami, found that at least two cycad species share nitrogen and carbon through the soil, thereby creating habitable environments for other organisms. (2020-07-26)

Desert mosses use quartz rocks as sun shades
Desert conditions are harsh, and mosses often spend much of the year in a dormant condition, desiccated and brown, until rain comes. UC Berkeley and Cal State-LA researchers discovered two species of moss that found a hiding place under translucent milky quartz where they can stay moist and green and continue to photosynthesize and grow while other mosses on the soil surface go dormant. This is the first green plant known to seek such refuge. (2020-07-23)

Florida harmful algal blooms produce multiple toxins detrimental to human health
In 2018, cyanobacteria from nutrient-rich waters in Lake Okeechobee were released down the Caloosahatchee river at the same time red tides were gathering along the Florida west coast, potentially exposing coastal residents to a mixture of toxins. (2020-07-20)

Cyanobacteria from Lake Chad analyzed for toxins
Analysis of dried cyanobacterial cakes from Lake Chad show that they are rich in needed amino acids, but some exceed WHO standards for microcystin, a potent liver toxin. Cyanobacteria can supplement the diets of undernourished villagers, but periodic monitoring of toxins is needed. (2020-07-14)

Uncovering the architecture of natural photosynthetic machinery
Researchers at the University of Liverpool have uncovered the molecular architecture and organisational landscape of thylakoid membranes from a model cyanobacterium in unprecedented detail. The study, which is published in Nature Plants, could help researchers find new and improved artificial photosynthetic technologies for energy production. (2020-07-13)

Milking algae mechanically: Progress to succeed petroleum derived chemicals
A method to extract carbohydrates and phycobiliproteins from algae was developed that does not kill the algae during harvest or rely on solvents for extraction and purification. This novel method uses mechanical shearing to 'milk' the desired compounds, greatly reducing the production cost of algae-derived compounds. (2020-07-08)

Study reveals how bacteria build essential carbon-fixing machinery
Scientists from the University of Liverpool have revealed new insight into how cyanobacteria construct the organelles that are essential for their ability to photosynthesise. (2020-07-08)

To quench or not to quench: Understanding the role of a cyanobacterial photosystem protein
Photosynthesis is one of the most fundamental processes that support life on earth. The mechanistic details of how the energy captured from the sun is transferred within the cellular photosynthetic structures are still not understood well. A group of scientists from Okayama University, Japan, analyzed the structural and spectroscopic data of the 'IsiA-PSI' supercomplex, and have unraveled a part of the puzzle of photosynthetic energy transfer in cyanobacteria. (2020-07-06)

More ecosystem engineers create stability, preventing extinctions
Biological builders like beavers, elephants, and shipworms re-engineer their environments. How this affects their ecological network is the subject of new research, which finds that increasing the number of ''ecosystem engineers'' stabilizes the entire network against extinctions. (2020-07-03)

New candidate for raw material synthesis through gene transfer
Cyanobacteria hardly need any nutrients and use the energy of sunlight. Bathers are familiar with these microorganisms as they often occur in waters. A group of researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) has discovered that the multicellular species Phormidium lacuna can be genetically modified by natural transformation and could thus produce substances such as ethanol or hydrogen. They present their results in the online scientific journal PLOS ONE (DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone. 0234440). (2020-07-02)

Ancient Maya reservoirs contained toxic pollution
Reservoirs in the heart of an ancient Maya city were so polluted with mercury and algae that the water likely was undrinkable. ?Researchers from the University of Cincinnati found toxic levels of pollution in two central reservoirs in Tikal, an ancient Maya city that dates back to the third century B.C. in what is now northern Guatemala. UC's findings suggest droughts in the ninth century likely contributed to the depopulation and eventual abandonment of the city. (2020-06-26)

Study quantifies socioeconomic benefits of satellites for harmful algal bloom detection
A Resources for the Future (RFF) and NASA VALUABLES Consortium study published in GeoHealth examines the benefits of using satellite data to detect harmful algal blooms and manage recreational advisories in Utah Lake. The study finds that the use of such data can result in socioeconomic benefits worth hundreds of thousands of dollars from one harmful algal bloom event. (2020-06-24)

From bacteria to you: The biological reactions that sustain our rhythms
Methylation and the circadian clock are both conserved mechanisms found in all organisms. Kyoto University researchers found that inhibiting methylation with a specific compound disrupts the circadian clock in most organisms except bacteria. The team transformed specific methylation genes from bacteria into animal cells to rescue said inhibition, opening potentially new treatments for methylation deficiencies. (2020-06-11)

Parasitic fungi keep harmful blue-green algae in check
When a lake is covered with green scums during a warm summer, cyanobacteria -- often called blue-green algae -- are usually involved. Mass development of cyanobacteria is bad for water quality. But cyanobacteria can become sick, when for instance infected by fungal parasites. Researchers found out that these infections do not only kill cyanobacteria, they also make them easier to consume for their natural predators. Fungal parasites thus help to slow down the growth of blue-green algae. (2020-06-09)

More efficient biosolar cells modelled on nature
Potential sources of renewable energy include protein complexes that are responsible for photosynthesis. However, their efficiency in technical applications still leaves much to be desired. For example, they cannot convert green light into energy. A research team from Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum (RUB) and the Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa has successfully closed this so-called green gap by combining a photosynthesis protein complex with a light-collecting protein from cyanobacteria. (2020-06-02)

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