Current Cybersecurity News and Events

Current Cybersecurity News and Events, Cybersecurity News Articles.
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Tests reveal cybersecurity vulnerabilities of common seismological equipment
Seismic monitoring devices linked to the internet are vulnerable to cyberattacks that could disrupt data collection and processing, say researchers who have probed the devices for weak points. (2021-02-10)

'Zoombombing' research shows legitimate meeting attendees cause most attacks
Most zoombombing incidents are ''inside jobs'' according to a new study featuring researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2021-02-03)

Want a hot stock tip? Avoid this type of investment fund
'Buy low and sell high' says the old adage about investing in the stock market. But a relatively new type of investment fund is luring unsophisticated investors into buying when values are at their highest, resulting in losses almost immediately, a new study has found. The lure? Buying into trendy investment areas like cannabis, cybersecurity and work-from-home businesses. (2021-01-15)

New solutions for addressing systemic risks
Systemic risks like climate change, cybersecurity and pandemics are characterised by high complexity, uncertainty, ambiguity, and effects beyond the system in which they originate. That's why novel research approaches and regulatory measures are indispensable for the evaluation and management of these risks. An interdisciplinary team recently published a paper on this subject, which appears as the first article in a special issue of the journal ''Risk Analysis,'' edited by Ortwin Renn and Pia-Johanna Schweizer from the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies. (2020-12-18)

A better kind of cybersecurity strategy
The multilateral nature of cybersecurity today makes it markedly different than conventional security, according to a study co-authored by Alexander Wolitzky of MIT. The researchers' new model shows why countries that retaliate too much against online attacks can make things worse for themselves. (2020-12-09)

New cyberattack can trick scientists into making toxins or viruses -- Ben-Gurion University researchers
The researchers found that accessibility and automation of the synthetic gene engineering workflow, combined with insufficient cybersecurity controls, allow malware to interfere with biological processes within the victim's lab, closing the loop with the possibility of an exploit written into a DNA molecule. (2020-11-30)

Misinformation or artifact: a new way to think about machine learning
Machine learning has delivered amazing results, but there also have been failures, ranging from the harmless to potentially deadly. New work from University of Houston philosopher Cameron Buckner suggests that common assumptions about the cause behind these supposed malfunctions may be mistaken, information that is crucial for evaluating the reliability of these networks. (2020-11-23)

The Phish scale: NIST's new tool helps IT staff see why users click on fraudulent emails
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a new tool called the Phish Scale that could help organizations better train their employees to avoid a particularly dangerous form of cyber attack known as phishing. (2020-09-17)

New ACM study gives most detailed picture to date of US bachelor's programs in computing
ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, recently released its eighth annual Study of Non-Doctoral Granting Departments in Computing (NDC study). With the aim of providing a comprehensive look at computing education, the study includes information on enrollments, degree completions, faculty demographics, and faculty salaries. (2020-09-10)

The case of ibuprofen: evidence of huge impact of COVID-19 misinformation when coming from credible sources
Researchers analysed the digital life of fake news about the adverse effects of ibuprofen in coronavirus patients, driven by a tweet posted by a French minister (2020-09-04)

Paper ballots, risk-limiting audits can help defend elections and democracy, study finds
With just over two months before the 2020 election, three professors at the Indiana University Kelley School of Business offer a comprehensive review of how other nations are seeking to protect their democratic institutions and presents how a multifaceted, targeted approach is needed to achieve that goal in the U.S., where intelligence officials have warned that Russia and other rivals are again attempting to undermine our democracy. (2020-09-02)

Consumers don't fully trust smart home technologies
Smart home technologies are marketed to enhance your home and make life easier. However, UK consumers are not convinced that they can trust the privacy and security of these technologies, a study by WMG, University of Warwick has shown. (2020-08-04)

Privacy flaws in security and doorbell cameras discovered by Florida Tech Student
Ring, Nest, SimpliSafe and eight other manufacturers of internet-connected doorbell and security cameras have been alerted to ''systemic design flaws'' discovered by Florida Tech computer science student Blake Janes that allow a shared account that appears to have been removed to actually remain in place with continued access to the video feed. (2020-05-26)

A pioneering study into the description of the architecture of a new standard for telecommunications
The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) is a United Nations Organization agency commissioned to regulate international telecommunications between different operating administrations and businesses. Pursuant to specific recommendations by this organization, on 1 July, standard Y.3172, an architecture for machine learning in future networks (5G and beyond), was approved for telecommunications networks. (2020-05-08)

We believe we're less likely than others are to fall for online scams
We believe we are less likely than others are to fall for phishing scams, thereby underestimating our own exposure to risk, a new cybersecurity study has found. (2020-05-06)

Firms perceived to fake social responsibility become targets for hackers, study shows
What corporate leaders may not realize is that strides they are making toward social responsibility may be placing a proverbial target on their backs -- if their efforts appear to be disingenuous, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame. (2020-05-05)

Software flaws often first reported on social media networks, PNNL researchers find
Software vulnerabilities are more likely to be discussed on social media before they're revealed on a government reporting site, a practice that could pose a national security threat, according to computer scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. (2020-05-04)

Engendering trust in an AI world
Regulators play a balancing act between protecting individuals and enabling business innovation, said speakers at a conference on AI and commercial law organised by SMU. (2020-03-02)

Computer scientists' new tool fools hackers into sharing keys for better cybersecurity
Instead of blocking hackers, a new cybersecurity defense approach developed by University of Texas at Dallas computer scientists actually welcomes them. The method, called DEEP-Dig (DEcEPtion DIGging), ushers intruders into a decoy site so the computer can learn from hackers' tactics. The information is then used to train the computer to recognize and stop future attacks. (2020-02-27)

In an Internet vacuum, private securities companies prosper in the 'new wild west'
A 'quiet' revolution in unregulated areas of the internet has led to the emergence of a new private security industry, according to latest research from the University of Portsmouth. Often described as the ''new wild west'', criminals see new opportunities online, with this latest study showing how individuals and organisations are now taking the law into their own hands in order to protect themselves. (2020-02-20)

Hey Google, are my housemates using my smart speaker?
Surveys show that consumers are worried that smart speakers are eavesdropping on their conversations and day-to-day lives. Now University of British Columbia researchers have found that people are also concerned about something else: friends, family and others who may have access to these devices. (2020-01-28)

The great e-scooter hack
New research out of UTSA finds e-scooters have risks beyond the perils of potential collisions. Computer science experts at UTSA have published the first review of the security and privacy risks posed by e-scooters and their related software services and applications. (2020-01-27)

Cultural differences account for global gap in online regulation -- study
Differences in cultural values have led some countries to tackle the specter of cyber-attacks with increased internet regulation, whilst others have taken a 'hands-off' approach to online security -- a new study shows. (2019-12-02)

Study finds companies may be wise to share cybersecurity efforts
Research finds that when one company experiences a cybersecurity breach, other companies in the same field also become less attractive to investors. However, companies that are open about their cybersecurity risk management fare significantly better than peers that don't disclose their cybersecurity efforts. (2019-10-29)

Preventing cyber security attacks lies in strategic, third-party investments, study finds
Companies interested in protecting themselves and their customers from cyber-attacks need to invest in themselves and the vendors that handle their data, according to new research from American University. (2019-10-21)

How cities can leverage citizen data while protecting privacy
In a new study, MIT researchers find that there is, in fact, a way for Indian cities to preserve citizen privacy while using their data to improve efficiency. (2019-09-25)

Attackers could be listening to what you type
You likely know to avoid suspicious emails to keep hackers from gleaning personal information from your computer. But a new study from SMU (Southern Methodist University) suggests that it's possible to access your information in a much subtler way: by using a nearby smart phone to intercept the sound of your typing. (2019-08-14)

Tel Aviv U and Technion researchers wrest control of one of world's most secure PLCs
Cybersecurity researchers at Tel Aviv University and the Technion Institute of Technology have discovered critical vulnerabilities in the Siemens S7 Simatic programmable logic controller (PLC), one of the world's most secure PLCs, which are used to run industrial processes. (2019-08-08)

Hackers could use connected cars to gridlock whole cities
In a future when self-driving and other internet-connected cars share the roads with the rest of us, hackers could not only wreck the occasional vehicle but possibly compound attacks to gridlock whole cities by stalling out a limited percentage of cars. Physicists calculated how many hacked, stalled connected cars would cause how much mayhem. (2019-07-28)

$4.6 million award creates program to train cybersecurity professionals
A five-year, $4.63 million award from the National Science Foundation will enable a multi-disciplinary team of researchers at the University of Arkansas to create a program to recruit, educate and train the next generation of cybersecurity professionals. (2019-07-16)

Army game-theory research better allocates military resources, fight cancer
US Army game-theory research using artificial intelligence may help treat cancer and other diseases, improve cybersecurity, deploy Soldiers and assets more efficiently and even win a poker game. (2019-07-15)

Personalized medicine software vulnerability uncovered by Sandia researchers
A weakness in one common open source software for genomic analysis left DNA-based medical diagnostics vulnerable to cyberattacks. Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories identified the weakness and notified the software developers, who issued a patch to fix the problem. The issue has also been fixed in the latest release of the software, and no attack from this vulnerability is known. (2019-07-02)

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, July 2019
ORNL story tips: Study of waste soft drinks for carbon capture could help cut carbon dioxide emissions; sharing secret messages among three parties using quantum communications just got more practical for better cybersecurity; designed synthetic polymers can serve as high-performance binding material for next-generation li-ion batteries; high-fidelity modeling for predicting radiation interactions outside reactor core could keep nuclear reactors running longer; scientists looking to neural networks to create computers that mimic human brain. (2019-07-01)

Keeping children safe in the 'Internet of Things' age
Children need protection when using programmable Internet computing devices -- and Lancaster University scientists have drawn up new guidelines to help designers build in safeguards. (2019-06-21)

National emergency alerts potentially vulnerable to attack
New research shows that hackers, working with limited resources, could send fake emergency alerts to cell phones in a confined area like a sports stadium. (2019-06-20)

First cyber agility framework to train officials developed to out-maneuver cyber attacks
To help train government and industry organizations on how to prevent cyberattacks, as part of a research project for the US Army, scientists at The University of Texas at San Antonio, developed the first framework to score the agility of cyber attackers and defenders. (2019-06-11)

Cyber of the fittest: Researchers develop first cyber agility framework to measure attacks
The framework proposed by the researchers will help government and industry organizations visualize how well they out-maneuver attacks over time. This groundbreaking work will be published in an upcoming issue of IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security, a top cybersecurity journal. (2019-06-10)

UBC researchers find ways to hackproof smart meters
Cybersecurity researcher Karthik Pattabiraman, an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of British Columbia, has developed an automated program aimed at foiling smart meter hacking and boosting security in the smart grid. (2019-06-06)

Combing through someone's phone could lead to end of relationship -- or not
For some people, the thought of their partner, friend or colleague snooping through their phone, reading their texts and emails, is an automatic deal breaker. However, some relationships can survive the snooping, a new study examining the motivations behind phone snooping has found. (2019-05-30)

SwRI develops system to legally test GPS spoofing vulnerabilities in automated vehicles
Southwest Research Institute has developed a cyber security system to test for vulnerabilities in automated vehicles and other technologies that use GPS receivers for positioning, navigation and timing. (2019-04-30)

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