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Current Cytokines News and Events, Cytokines News Articles.
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Nasal biomarkers predict severity of pollen-specific allergy symptoms
It is not only people with allergies, but also a subgroup of people without one that suffer in spring and have nasal problems from contact with pollen. A new study shows that biomarkers in the nose can predict the severity of the symptoms that will occur in spring even before the pollen season starts. (2020-04-29)

Nutrient deficiency in tumor cells attracts cells that suppress the immune system
A study led by IDIBELL researchers and published this week in the American journal PNAS shows that, by depriving tumor cells of glucose, they release a large number of signaling molecules. The signaling cascade produced by the lack of nutrients induces tumor inflammation, a determining factor for the evolution of the disease. (2020-04-21)

Proteins may halt the severe cytokine storms seen in COVID-19 patients
A team of MIT researchers has developed specialized antibody-like receptor proteins that they believe could soak up the excess cytokines produced during a cytokine storm. This excessive immune response, sometimes seen in Covid-19 patients, can be fatal. (2020-04-16)

High blood glucose levels may explain why some flu patients experience severe symptoms
Influenza A (a highly contagious virus that causes annual flu epidemics worldwide) may trigger an inflammatory 'cytokine storm' -- an excessive immune response that can lead to hospitalization or even death -- by increasing glucose metabolism, according to a new study. (2020-04-15)

Could inhibiting the DPP4 enzyme help treat coronavirus?
Researchers and clinicians are scrambling to find ways to combat COVID-19, including new therapeutics and eventually a vaccine. In a commentary published in the journal Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, Miller School of Medicine professor and endocrinologist Gianluca Iacobellis, M.D., Ph.D., suggests the DPP4 enzyme presents an interesting target for further research, and DPP4 inhibitors could help some COVID-19 patients. (2020-04-13)

Researchers suggest a special diet against asthma
Can a special diet help in certain cases of asthma? A new study at the University of Bonn at least points to this conclusion. According to the study, mice that were switched to a so-called ketogenic diet showed significantly reduced inflammation of the respiratory tract. The results are now published in the renowned journal ''Immunity''. (2020-04-07)

Benefits of fish in moderation while pregnant outweigh risks for child
To eat or not to eat fish is a question that has long concerned pregnant women. Now, a new USC study shows that children whose mothers ate moderate amounts of fish during pregnancy were more likely to have a better metabolic profile -- despite the risk of exposure to mercury -- than children whose mothers ate fish rarely. (2020-03-16)

A new strategy for the management of inflammatory pain
A group of researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin has discovered a new mechanism of long-lasting pain relief. The cell-signaling protein interleukin-4 induces a specific type of blood cell to produce endogenous opioids at the site of inflammation. The researchers' findings have been published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation (JCI) Insight*. (2020-03-16)

Cancer: The immune system attacks tumors remotely
How does the immune system act to limit tumor development? Using in vivo imaging tools, scientists from the Institut Pasteur and Inserm described the spatiotemporal activity of tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes, both locally and remotely. (2020-03-12)

Arming the body's immune cells
Researchers at UC have discovered a previously unknown mechanism that could explain the reason behind decreased immune function in cancer patients and could be a new therapeutic target for immunotherapy for those with head and neck cancers. (2020-03-10)

Immunology: Tonsils as a testbed
Biomedical researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have isolated immune cells from human tonsils obtained following routine surgery, and used them to analyze aspects of the immune response and test the effects of anti-inflammatory agents at the cellular level. (2020-02-28)

Scientists discover how rogue communications between cells lead to leukemia
New research has deciphered how rogue communications in blood stem cells can cause leukemia. The discovery could pave the way for new, targeted medical treatments that block this process. (2020-02-06)

Flickering light mobilizes brain chemistry that may fight Alzheimer's
The promise of flickering light to treat Alzheimer's takes another step forward in this new study, which reveals stark biochemical mechanisms: 40 Hertz stimulus triggers a marked release of signaling chemicals. (2020-02-03)

After a bone injury, shape-shifting cells rush to the rescue
Conventional thinking is that bone regeneration is left to a small number of mighty cells called skeletal stem cells, which reside within larger groups of bone marrow stromal cells. (2020-01-29)

100 years after development, TB vaccines vary in ability to stimulate immune components
New research from the Precision Vaccines Program at Boston Children's Hospital shows that BCG vaccines for tuberculosis prevention vary widely in their ability to activate components of the immune system. These findings highlight important differences between BCG formulations and the need for a large clinical study comparing them. (2020-01-28)

Studies of membrane vesicles pave the way to innovative treatments of degenerative diseases
Membrane vesicles can become a new therapeutic tool in regenerative medicine and a new class of effective and safe medications. (2020-01-15)

Two cancer-causing genes work together to promote metastasis
Cancer-promoting genes MYC and TWIST1 co-opt immune system cells to enable cancer cells to spread, but blocking a key step in this process can help prevent the disease from developing. (2020-01-14)

Boost to lung immunity following infection
The strength of the immune system in response to respiratory infections is constantly changing, depending on the history of previous, unrelated infections, according to new research from the Crick. (2020-01-13)

Smoking HIV out of dormancy
A new mechanism uncovered by a Norwegian research group could improve the chances of developing a cure for HIV by forcing the virus out of dormancy so that it can be killed. (2020-01-09)

In fighting gut infections, nervous system is key, Yale-Harvard team finds
The peaceful and delicate co-existence of friendly gut bacteria and the immune system relies on highly coordinated information exchange between immune system cells and certain cells lining the intestine. Scaientists at Yale and Harvard medical schools have discovered that, in response to bacterial invaders, nerve cells within the intestine -- and not immune cells or cells lining the intestinal wall -- release infection-fighting cytokines. (2020-01-09)

Study finds differences in energy use by immune cells in ME/CFS
New findings published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation suggest that specific immune T cells from people with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) show disruptions in the way they produce energy. The research was supported by the National Institutes of Health. (2019-12-12)

'Invisible,' restricted horse racing therapy may leave a trail
Shockwave therapy is used in both horses and humans to speed healing, but it can also mask pain. For the first time, researchers led by Mary Robinson and Jinwen Chen of the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine have identified several biomarkers of the treatment, the use of which is restricted in horse racing. (2019-12-10)

The 'Signal Cell' relaying microbiota signals discovered
Prof. Seung-Woo Lee and his research team from POSTECH revealed the microbiota signal mechanism. (2019-11-25)

Newly discovered immune cells contribute to toxic shock
Recently discovered immune cells called MAIT cells play a key role in group A streptococcal toxic shock, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report. The results, which are published in the journal PNAS, have potential implications for the diagnosis and treatment of this life-threatening condition. (2019-11-25)

Secretome of pleural effusions associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and malignant...
Cryopreserved cell-free PE fluid from 101 NSCLC patients, 8 mesothelioma and 13 with benign PE was assayed for a panel of 40 cytokines/chemokines using the Luminex system. Comparing NSCLC PE and published plasma levels of CAR-T recipients, both were dominated by sIL-6R and IL-6 but NSCLC PE had more VEGF, FGF2 and TNF, and less IL-2, IL-4, IL-13, IL-15, MIP1 and IFN. (2019-11-22)

Small RNAs link immune system and brain cells
A collaborative study carried out by the Institute of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy at Goethe University (Professor Jochen Klein) and the Institute of Neurosciences at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Professor Hermona Soreq) shows sex-specific biases in disease-specific changes in brain cells, as well as in cellular control mechanisms based on endogenous short ribonucleic acid (RNA) chains. (2019-11-12)

Revealed a mechanism of beta-cells involved in the development of type-1 diabetes
Researchers reveal how beta cells in the pancreas respond to an inflammatory environment and how this response is implicated in the risk of developing Type 1 diabetes. (2019-11-06)

Secretome of pleural effusions associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and malignant meso
Cryopreserved cell-free PE fluid from 101 NSCLC patients, 8 mesothelioma and 13 with benign PE was assayed for a panel of 40 cytokines/chemokines using the Luminex system. (2019-11-05)

Frontotemporal dementia is associated with alterations in immune system function
Recent research from the University of Eastern Finland revealed increased inflammatory activity in a subgroup of patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Increased inflammation was associated with parkinsonism symptoms and more rapid disease progression. In addition, the results showed that cancer is rare in FTD, whereas some autoimmune diseases may be more common among FTD patients. These findings may indicate an overactive immune system in FTD. (2019-10-15)

Teenage acne may be a natural, transient inflammatory state
Adolescent acne does not always result in a pathological condition; rather, it may be a natural, transient inflammatory state occurring when the maturing facial skin is exposed to new microbes and enhanced production of an oily substance called sebum. Researchers argue that their novel framework suggests that the development of new treatments should focus on promoting mechanisms that restore homeostasis between facial skin and its microbial and chemical milieu. (2019-09-26)

Unravelling an alternative mechanism of airway mucosal immunity
Researchers from Kanazawa University have identified two key proteins, ASC and NLRP3, in the maintenance of the innate immune homeostasis in the airway. These proteins do so by a caspase-1-independent mechanism, suggesting that there may be multiple mechanisms involved in protection against microbial infections. (2019-09-25)

Texas Biomed researchers pinpoint why HIV patients are more likely to develop tuberculosis
Tuberculosis and HIV -- two of the world's deadliest infectious diseases -- are far worse when they occur together. Now, Texas Biomedical Research Institute researchers have pinpointed an important mechanism at work in this troubling health problem. And, their discovery could lead to a new mode of treatment for people at risk. The results were published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, a top-tier venue for critical advances in biomedical research. (2019-09-12)

Research discoveries suggest that LH dipeptide improves mental health
A research group led by Professor Tomoyuki Furuyashiki and Associate Professor Shiho Kitaoka (Graduate School of Medicine) in collaboration with researcher Yasuhisa Ano of Kirin Holdings have made discoveries regarding the effect of the dipeptide Leucine-Histidine (LH) in suppressing microglial activation and depression-associated emotional disturbances. LH dipeptide is found in fermented foods such as blue cheese and natto (fermented soy beans). Foods rich in LH dipeptide may be a safe, preventive method for maintaining good mental health. (2019-09-12)

Scientists isolate protective proteins that influence outcomes for type 2 diabetes
Scientists from the School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, have, for the first time, discovered a family of proteins that are associated with lower blood sugar levels among obese patients with type 2 diabetes, implying that those proteins are associated with a better control of the patient's disease. (2019-09-09)

Danish-American research presents new ways of developing treatment of chronic inflammation
Researchers from Aarhus University Hospital and Aarhus University in Denmark in collaboration with researchers from Colorado in the United States have found a new way to treat the inflammation involved in chronic diseases such as psoriasis, asthma and HIV. A group of transmitter substances (cytokines) in the immune system, the so-called IL-1 family, has been shown to play an important role in many of these diseases by regulating the body's immune responses. (2019-08-30)

Moffitt researchers discover possible new treatment strategy for lung cancer
It is estimated there will be roughly 228,000 new lung cancer cases this year, and nearly 30% of those patients will have mutations in the KRAS pathway. This type of mutation makes the cancer more aggressive and difficult to treat. Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center are hoping to change that. In a new study published in Cancer Research, the team discovered a new treatment approach that may help this group of patients. (2019-08-19)

City of Hope study finds novel mechanism of action for NK cells in checkpoint inhibitor for cancer
City of Hope scientists have discovered that natural killer (NK) cells provide one reason why anti-PD-L1 antibodies might work when tumor cells do not express PD-L1. The study, published today in Cancer Discovery, found that NK cells can also express PD-L1 in some cancer patients. PD-L1 expression on the NK cells identifies them as charged or highly activated and can demonstrate anti-tumor activity. (2019-07-26)

Antibiotics can inhibit skin lymphoma
New research from the LEO Foundation Skin Immunology Research Center at the University of Copenhagen shows, surprisingly, that antibiotics inhibit cancer in the skin in patients with rare type of lymphoma. (2019-07-25)

Study: Fat cells play key role in dangerous transformation of melanoma
Tel Aviv University reseachers have found that fat cells play a key role in the dangerous transformation of melanoma. (2019-07-23)

Genes linked to death from sepsis ID'd in mice
Bacteria in the bloodstream can trigger an overwhelming immune response that causes sepsis. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found genes that help protect the body's cells from dying during sepsis, which could lead to new treatments for the life-threatening condition. (2019-07-22)

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