Current Dams News and Events | Page 2

Current Dams News and Events, Dams News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 2 of 11 | 430 Results
New analysis reveals challenges for drought management in Oregon's Willamette River Basin
In Oregon's fertile Willamette River Basin, where two-thirds of the state's population lives, managing water scarcity would be more effective if conservation measures were introduced in advance and upstream from the locations where droughts are likely to cause shortages. (2019-07-15)

City College-led experts develop flood prediction model
The duration of floods can be determined by river flow, precipitation and atmospheric blocking. Now an international team of researchers led by Nasser Najibi and Naresh Devineni at The City College of New York is offering a novel physically based Bayesian network model for inference and prediction of flood duration. The model also accurately examines the timescales of flooding. (2019-07-15)

Inbreeding depression reduces litter sizes in golden retrievers
Data from the Morris Animal Foundation Golden Retriever Lifetime Study shows that inbreeding depression, the result of breeding closely-related individuals, reduces litter sizes in purebred golden retrievers. (2019-07-09)

Equations help predict the behavior of water in rivers
University of Cordoba researchers developed a mathematical model that allows for anticipating the failure of dikes that hold in overflowing river water. (2019-07-02)

Ancient intervention could boost dwindling water reserves in coastal Peru
Methods used 1,400 years ago could boost water availability during Lima's dry season, according to new Imperial College London research. (2019-06-24)

How to prevent mosquitofish from spreading in water ecosystems
Preventing the introduction of the mosquitofish and removing its population are the most effective actions to control the dispersal of this exotic fish in ponds and lakes, according to a study published in the journal Science of the Total Environment. (2019-05-24)

New study in Nature: Just one-third of the world's longest rivers remain free-flowing
Infrastructure development and other man-made changes have already fragmented or disrupted two-thirds of Earth's longest rivers. Dams and reservoirs are the leading contributors to connectivity loss in global rivers. A team of 34 international researchers from World Wildlife Fund (WWF), McGill and other institutions assessed the connectivity status of 12 million kilometers of rivers worldwide, providing the first-ever global assessment of the location and extent of the planet's remaining free-flowing rivers. (2019-05-08)

The Tietê, São Paulo State's main river, is filtered by dam reservoirs
Reservoir cascade steadily improves water transparency by retaining matter in suspension that affects light absorption, as measured by a study conducted in Brazil. (2019-04-29)

Natural landscapes? Scientists call for a paradigm shift in restoration projects
Regardless of whether we are dealing with a floodplain landscape or an entire national park, the success of a restoration project depends on more than just the reintroduction of individual plant or animal species into an area. In the latest issue of Science, a international team of researchers reveals it is more a matter of helping the damaged ecosystem to regenerate and sustain itself. (2019-04-25)

Studying reintroduction of bull trout with simulations
Their project is one of the first to use an advanced computer model to simulate the genetic and demographic outcomes of the reintroduction by projecting 200 years into the future. (2019-03-28)

Coastal ecosystems suffer from upriver hydroelectric dams
Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and UC Riverside found that inland river dams can have highly destructive effects on the stability and productivity of coastline and estuarine habitats, which provide protection from storms, commercial fishery habitats, and belowground carbon storage. (2019-03-13)

Matrix could ensure vital copper supplies
Researchers have identified a matrix of risks that the mining industry must overcome to unlock vitally important copper reserves. University of Queensland geologist Professor Rick Valenta said copper would be crucial in a renewable-powered future, but global supplies were far from guaranteed. (2019-03-05)

Ecosystem responses to dam removal complex, but predictable
In the United States, the removal of dams now outpaces the construction of new ones -- with more than 1,400 dams decommissioned since the 1970s -- and a new study suggests that the ecosystem effects of dam removal can be predicted. (2019-02-20)

Study: Environmental regulations may have unintended consequences in energy production
Many countries have passed environmental laws to preserve natural ecosystems. Although the regulations seem to have improved preservation efforts, they may have had unintended consequences in energy production, leading to more greenhouse gas emissions. That's the conclusion of a new study by a researcher at Carnegie Mellon University that appears in the journal PLOS ONE. (2019-02-04)

Neurotoxic cyanotoxins prevalent in eastern Australian freshwater systems study shows
The presence of an amino acid, BMAA, produced by blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) and thought to be associated with a higher incidence of neurodegenerative disease, has been confirmed in eastern Australian freshwater systems. (2019-01-23)

Social and environmental costs of hydropower are underestimated, study shows
Study shows that deforestation, loss of biodiversity and economic damage done to communities living near dams have not been factored into the cost of these projects. Large dams also ignore the effects of climate change. (2019-01-10)

Experts warn against mega-dams in lowland tropical forests
Mega-dams should not be built in lowland tropical forest regions due to the threat they pose to biodiversity and ecosystems, according to experts at the University of Stirling. (2019-01-08)

A damming trend
Hundreds of dams are being proposed for Mekong River basin in Southeast Asia. The negative social and environmental consequences -- affecting everything from food security to the environment -- greatly outweigh the positive changes of this grand-scale flood control, according to new research by Michigan State University. (2018-12-14)

The long dry: why the world's water supply is shrinking
A global study has found a paradox: our water supplies are shrinking at the same time as climate change is generating more intense rain. And the culprit is the drying of soils, say researchers, pointing to a world where drought-like conditions will become the new normal, especially in regions that are already dry. (2018-12-13)

Human actions impact wild salmon's ability to evolve
Once spring-run chinook salmon disappear, they are not likely to re-emerge, indicates genetic analysis of the revered wild fish in a study led by the University of California, Davis. Prompt conservation action could preserve spring-run chinook, as well as their evolutionary potential. (2018-12-04)

The unintended consequences of dams and reservoirs
An international team of drought scientists show that while many dams and reservoirs are built, or expanded, to alleviate droughts and water shortages, they can paradoxically contribute to make them worse. The study is published in Nature Sustainability. (2018-11-13)

Hydropower, innovations and avoiding international dam shame
For sweeping drama, it's hard to beat hydropower from dams -- a renewable source of electricity that helped build much of the developed world. Yet five scientists from Michigan State University say that behind roaring cascades is a legacy of underestimated costs and overestimated value. (2018-11-05)

WSU researchers see cognitive changes in offspring of heavy cannabis-using rats
Washington State University researchers have seen cognitive changes in the offspring of rats exposed to heavy amounts of cannabis. Their work is one of the rare studies to look at the effects of cannabis during pregnancy. The drug is the most commonly used illicit substance among pregnant women. (2018-11-04)

Yangtze dams put endangered sturgeon's future in doubt
Before the damming of the Yangtze River in 1981, Chinese sturgeon swam freely each summer one after another into the river's mouth, continuing upriver while fasting all along the way. They bred in the upper spawning ground the following fall before returning quickly back to the sea. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Nov. 1 offer new insight into the threat the dams have since posed to the critically endangered fish. (2018-11-01)

A breakthrough for Australia's fish
A research team from the Threatened Species Recovery Hub has made a breakthrough that could help dwindling numbers of Australian freshwater fish species. Dr Jabin Watson from the University of Queensland says the innovation will allow small and young fish to get past barriers like culverts. (2018-09-02)

Beavers have an impact on the climate
A rising water level affects the interaction between beaver ponds, water and air, as well as the carbon balance of the zone of ground closest to water. (2018-08-29)

Catastrophic floods can trigger human resettlement away from rivers
A new study by researchers at Uppsala University, published in the journal Science Advances, uses satellite nighttime light data to reveal how flood protection shapes the average distance of settlements from rivers. (2018-08-22)

JRC analysis assists response to Laos dam collapse
Scientists at the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, have carried out a dam break analysis to assist with emergency response efforts following catastrophic flooding in the Mekong Delta. (2018-08-03)

Aphids manipulate their food
Aphids - who hasn't been bothered by these little insects at one time or another? Why do they reproduce on plants so successfully? These are among the questions that Professor Dr Caroline Müller and her research team are addressing at Bielefeld University's Faculty of Biology. They have found out that aphids are able to influence the quality of their food, and that this may enable them to construct a niche on their own host plants. (2018-07-31)

Environmental changes in the Mekong Delta spell trouble for farmers
The Mekong Delta is home to 15 million people, many of whom rely on the delta's rich soil and water resources for farming and fishing. But their livelihoods are being threatened by rising sea levels, droughts, dams, and other hydrological shifts. A new article from researchers at the University of Illinois and Iowa State University explains the challenges. (2018-07-23)

This curious animal grew larger over time -- but its brain didn't quite keep up
Study finds that the ancestor of the modern day mountain beaver had a larger relative brain size, offering a rare example of brain size decrease over time. (2018-06-27)

Hydropower in Cambodia could threaten food security of region
Farmers and anglers in Cambodia depend on the Mekong River's predictable seasonal patterns, but new dams for hydroelectricity are altering the hydrology of the river. These changes have the potential to threaten fish migration, livelihoods, and regional food security. A new paper from the University of Illinois and Iowa State University urges a participatory approach for managing the Mekong River basin that engages local residents who have deep knowledge of the river. (2018-05-31)

Study finds big savings in removing dams over repairs
A new study by Portland State University researchers finds billions of dollars could be saved if the nation's aging dams are removed rather than repaired, but also suggests that better data and analysis is needed on the factors driving dam-removal efforts. (2018-05-29)

Construction delays make new nuclear power plants costlier than ever
The cost of building new nuclear power plants is nearly 20 percent higher than expected due to delays, a new analysis has found. (2018-05-29)

Beavers do dam good work cleaning water, research reveals
Beavers could help clean up polluted rivers and stem the loss of valuable soils from farms, new research shows. (2018-05-09)

Marmoset monkey model of Zika virus infection offers new insights into the human condition
A novel marmoset model of human Zika virus infection offers new opportunities for better understanding of how the virus causes congenital disease in humans. (2018-05-03)

Research brief: Freshwater ecosystems filter pollutants before they reach oceans
By adding excess nutrients to crops, some are very likely to end up in rivers, lakes and streams. But not all of the carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus that enter waterways end up downstream. Freshwater ecosystems filter some of the excess pollutants out of the water before it reaches the ocean, according to a new study. (2018-04-30)

Reversal of fortunes
Scientists have discovered that the seafloor from the Mississippi River Delta to the Gulf of Mexico is eroding like the land loss that is occurring on the Louisiana coast. This research was published recently in the journal Marine Geology. (2018-04-03)

Landslide modeling after Kaikoura Quake provides data to first responders
Hours after the 2016 Kaikoura earthquake hit New Zealand, researchers were able to share information with first responders about where significant landsliding might have occurred to block roads and rivers, according to a new report in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. (2018-03-26)

Animal migrations
Researchers estimate the vulnerability and extinction risk of migratory species from different regions and ecosystems. (2018-03-26)

Page 2 of 11 | 430 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.