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Current Dams News and Events, Dams News Articles.
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Flood protection is everyone's responsibility
Scientists in Vienna have studied the complex interplay between flooding events and economic decisions. Private businesses should not shoulder the responsibility for flood protection alone. In prosperous countries in particular, it makes sense for central government to establish the necessary infrastructure for flood protection. (2018-03-21)

Modulation of Fgf21 gene in early-life ameliorates adulthood diet-induced obesity
The nutritional environment in early life can lead to epigenetic changes in the genome that influence the risk of obesity in later life. In a new study, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers showed that the Fgf21gene undergoes PPARĪ±-dependent DNA demethylation in the liver during the postnatal period and its status may persist into adulthood. Fgf21 methylation represents a form of epigenetic memory, and may play a role in the developmental programming of obesity. (2018-03-09)

Study says Mekong River dams could disrupt lives, environment
The Mekong River traverses six Southeast Asian countries and supports the livelihoods of millions of people. New efforts to provide hydroelectric power to a growing and modernizing population include more than eight proposed main-stem dams and 60 or more existing tributary dams in the lower Mekong basin. A new article from University of Illinois and Iowa State University scientists lays out what dam construction could mean for residents and the environment in the region. (2018-03-08)

Shifting shorelines at Lake Tahoe caused by ancient lava dams
Pleistocene basaltic lavas form a small volcanic field that was erupted from seven vents in the northwestern Lake Tahoe basin. Most of these lavas were erupted above the water and produced lava flows that dammed the lake outlet and flowed into an early Lake Tahoe. The resulting steam explosions produced deltas composed of fragmental deposits as well as pillow lavas. (2018-02-13)

Avoiding blackouts with 100% renewable energy
Researchers propose three separate ways to avoid blackouts if the world transitions all its energy to electricity or direct heat and provides the energy with 100 percent wind, water and sunlight. The solutions reduce energy requirements, health damage and climate damage. (2018-02-08)

The influence of hydropower dams on river connectivity in the Andes Amazon
Hydropower dams in the Andes Amazon significantly disturb river connectivity in this region, and consequently, the many natural and human systems these rivers support, according a new study. The results challenge previous research that collectively underestimates these dams' effects, the authors say. Given the importance of the Andes Amazon rivers to more (2018-01-31)

Small hydroelectric dams increase globally with little research, regulations
University of Washington researchers have published the first major assessment of small hydropower dams around the world -- including their potential for growth -- and highlight the incredibly variability in how dams of varying sizes are categorized, regulated and studied. (2018-01-22)

The negative impact of climate change on freshwater bodies
A lot of research is being conducted into the acidification of the world's oceans. A recent study has proved that freshwater bodies are likewise affected. Rising carbon dioxide levels could upset the balance of species. (2018-01-12)

Sex education doesn't reflect real-life realities of lesbian and bisexual girls
Most lesbian and bisexual girls don't know they can get sexually transmitted infections (STIs) from other girls, because sex education is mostly designed for their straight peers. This knowledge gap could be placing them at increased risk for getting STIs. (2018-01-10)

Researchers chart dramatic decline in genetic diversity of Northwest salmon
Columbia River Chinook salmon have lost as much as two-thirds of their genetic diversity, Washington State University researchers have found. The researchers reached this conclusion after extracting DNA from scores of bone samples -- some harvested as many as 7,000 years ago -- and comparing them to the DNA of Chinook currently swimming in the Snake and Columbia rivers. The work is 'the first direct measure of reduced genetic diversity for Chinook salmon from the ancient to the contemporary period.' (2018-01-10)

Sardines take us to the sources of biodiversity in the Amazon River
What is the origin of this abundance of species in the Amazon River? Researchers at UNIGE have integrated a range of potential factors into a single statistical model to study the genesis of genetic diversity within a typical species. Their study describes the contribution of each factor and the synergies at work. This approach could be integrated into the study of the impact of various planned projects, as well as any human large-scale alteration. (2017-12-20)

Fish to benefit if large dams adopt new operating approach
Recognizing that many large dams are here to stay, a University of Washington team is investigating an emerging solution to help achieve freshwater conservation goals by re-envisioning the ways in which water is released by dams. (2017-12-18)

Sustainable dams -- are they possible?
Humans have been altering natural waterways for centuries, but only in the last several decades have dams raised ecological concerns. N. LeRoy Poff, professor of biology at Colorado State University, studies the ecological impact to rivers from human-caused changes, such as dam building, and how these modified river systems can be managed for resilience. In a Perspective piece in the journal Science, Poff writes on the state of research in sustainable dam design. (2017-12-11)

Hydropower dams can be managed without an all-or-nothing choice between energy and food
Nearly 100 hydropower dams are planned for construction along tributaries off the Mekong River's 2,700-mile stretch. In Science Magazine, researchers present a mathematical formula to balance power generation needs with the needs of fisheries downstream. (2017-12-07)

An unexpected way to boost fishery yields using dams
A new study based on the Mekong River basin, home to one of the largest freshwater fisheries in the world, reveals particular dam flow patterns that could be harnessed to boost food production -- by up to nearly four-fold compared to un-dammed ecosystems. (2017-12-07)

Are elevated levels of mercury in the American dipper due to run-of-river dams?
A study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry used American dippers to determine if run-of-river (RoR) dams altered food webs and mercury levels at 13 stream sites in British Columbia. (2017-11-01)

Among 'green' energy, hydropower is the most dangerous
Many governments are promoting a move away from fossil fuels towards renewable energy sources. However, in a study published today, scientists highlight some of the ecological dangers this wave of 'green' energy poses. (2017-10-25)

WSU researcher links salmon sex to geological change
It turns out that sex can move mountains. A Washington State University researcher has found that the mating habits of salmon can alter the profile of stream beds, affecting the evolution of an entire watershed. His studyis one of the first to quantitatively show that salmon can influence the shape of the land. (2017-10-19)

Impact of Amazonian hydropower is 'significantly underestimated', study finds
The environmental impact of hydropower generation in the Amazon may be greater than predicted, according to new University of Stirling research. (2017-10-19)

How has society adapted to hurricanes? A look at New Orleans over 300 years
In the midst of an intense hurricane season, a historical perspective published in WIREs Climate Change looks at adaptation to hurricanes in New Orleans over nearly three centuries, from its foundation in 1718 to Hurricane Katrina in 2005. (2017-09-26)

The losses that come after the earthquake: Devastating and costly
The study, titled, 'Losses Associated with Secondary Effects in Earthquakes,' published by Frontiers in Built Environmen, looks at the devastation resulting from secondary disasters, such as tsunamis, liquefaction of sediments, fires, landslides, and flooding that occurred during 100 key earthquakes that occurred from 1900 to the present. And unlike previous studies, Daniell et al put a dollar value to the devastation from these secondary causes. (2017-08-25)

Potential impacts of planned Andean Amazon dams outweigh benefits, scientists say
An international team of scientists investigating the effects of six planned or potential Andean dams on the Amazon river system has found that major negative ecological impacts can be expected both above the dams and throughout the lowland floodplains and the Amazon Delta. (2017-08-24)

Before the flood: What drives preparedness?
More targeted efforts are needed from both the public and private insurance sectors in order to encourage people to take action to reduce their risk of flood damage, according to a new study of three European countries. (2017-08-21)

Researchers produce new map of seismic hazards
Builders of hydroelectric dams are required to perform seismic hazard studies before their designs are approved. (2017-08-21)

Loss of 350 miles of Great Plains streams causing changes in aquatic food web
A decrease in Great Plains streams, fed by decreasing ground water, is changing fish assembles according to research published Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2017-08-02)

Damming and lost connectivity for fish in northeastern ecosystems
Fish that migrate between freshwater and sea ecosystems play a multitude of ecological roles. In the centuries since Europeans first colonized the Americas, damming and other disruptions to river connectivity have greatly decreased the migration opportunities of these species. (2017-07-19)

3-D models help scientists gauge flood impact
Using one of the world's most powerful supercomputers, a University of Iowa team performed one of the first highly resolved, 3-D, volume-of-fluid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations of a dam break in a natural environment. The simulation allowed the team to map precise water levels for actual flood events over time. (2017-07-18)

New assessment identifies global hotspots for water conflict
More than 1,400 new dams or water diversion projects are planned or already under construction, fueling the potential for increased water conflict between some countries. (2017-07-17)

'Big Muddy' Missouri river needs a plan
As the Missouri River flows across the Great Plains to where it meets the Mississippi River at St. Louis, it accumulates such a large sediment load that it has earned the nickname 'Big Muddy.' A recent University of Illinois study looks at the history of the river, damages and changes from the 2011 flood, and its current post-flood condition. The study concludes that the river needs a comprehensive plan with multi-state cooperation. (2017-07-11)

Study details evidence for past large earthquakes in the Eastern Tennessee seismic zone
The Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone (ETSZ), a zone of small earthquakes stretching from northeastern Alabama to southwestern Virginia, may have generated earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater within the last 25,000 years, according to a study published June 27 in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. (2017-06-26)

New flood study reveals America's most vulnerable communities
Floods are the natural disaster that kill the most people. They are also the most common natural disaster. As the threat of flooding increases worldwide, a group of scientists at LSU have gathered valuable information on flood hazard, exposure and vulnerability in counties throughout the US (2017-06-21)

Water management interventions push scarcity downstream
Human interventions to harness water resources, such as reservoirs, dams, and irrigation measures, have increased water availability for much of the global population, but at the same time, swept water scarcity problems downstream. (2017-06-15)

Hydroelectric dams may jeopardize the Amazon's future
Hundreds of built and proposed hydroelectric dams may significantly harm life in and around the Amazon by trapping the flow of rich nutrients and modifying the climate from Central America to the Gulf of Mexico. These findings, published in Nature, emerge from a multidisciplinary, international collaboration of researchers from 10 universities, led by scientists at The University of Texas at Austin. (2017-06-14)

Amazonia's future will be jeopardized by dams
The hundreds of hydroelectric dams proposed for the Amazon River Basin will cause massive environmental damage all the way from the eastern slopes of the Andes to the Atlantic Ocean. About one-third of the 428 dams are built or are under construction. The environmental effects will ramify throughout the river system and beyond. The largest river system on Earth, the Amazon River and its watershed cover 6.1 million square kilometers and includes nine countries. (2017-06-14)

When the rubber hits the road: Recycled tires create stronger concrete
UBC engineers have developed a more resilient type of concrete using recycled tires that could be used for concrete structures like buildings, roads, dams and bridges while reducing landfill waste. (2017-06-13)

First long-term study of Murray-Darling Basin wetlands reveals severe impact of dams
A landmark 30-year-long UNSW Sydney study of wetlands in eastern Australia has found that construction of dams and diversion of water from the Murray-Darling Basin have led to a more than 70 percent decline in waterbird numbers. The finding of severe degradation in the basin due to reduced water flow has significant implications for managing the development of other rivers in Australia and around the world. (2017-06-05)

Dams are major driver of global environmental change
Water reservoirs created by damming rivers could have significant impacts on the world's carbon cycle and climate system that aren't being accounted for, a new study concludes. (2017-05-17)

Exeter researchers help protect Peru's river dolphins
River dolphins and Amazonian manatees in Peru will benefit from new protection thanks to a plan developed with help from the University of Exeter. (2017-05-16)

New tool could help predict, prevent surging waters in flood plains
Find related stories on NSF's Environmental Research and Education (ERE) programs. A group of international scientists studying China's Yellow River has created a new tool that could help officials better predict and prevent its all-too-frequent floods, which threaten as many as 80 million. (2017-05-12)

Fish should figure in to fate of nation's aging dams
As nearly 75 percent of the nation's largest dams approach the high maintenance years, safety and economics figure large in decisions to fix or replace. A recent study by Michigan State University (MSU) researchers makes a case to consider how those dams affect the streams and fish that live in them. (2017-05-10)

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