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Current Dark Matter News and Events, Dark Matter News Articles.
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Natural radiation can interfere with quantum computers
Radiation from natural sources in the environment can limit the performance of superconducting quantum bits, known as qubits. (2020-08-26)
Study rules out DM destruction as origin of extra radiation in galaxy center
In a paper in Physical Review D, a University of California, Irvine-led team reports that - through an analysis of the Fermi data and an exhaustive series of modeling exercises - they were able to determine that an observed excess of gamma rays could not have been produced by what are called weakly interacting massive particles, most popularly theorized as the stuff of dark matter. (2020-08-26)
UC Davis researchers reveal molecular structures involved in plant respiration
A study published today (Aug. 25, 2020) in eLife provides the first-ever, atomic-level, 3D structure of the largest protein complex (complex I) involved in the plant mitochondrial electron transport chain. (2020-08-25)
A smart eye mask that tracks muscle movements to tell what 'caught your eye'
Integrating first-of-its-kind washable hydrogel electrodes with a pulse sensor, researchers from the University of Massachusetts Amherst have developed smart eyewear to track eye movement and cardiac data for physiological and psychological studies. (2020-08-20)
More healthful milk chocolate by adding peanut, coffee waste
Milk chocolate is a consumer favorite worldwide, prized for its sweet flavor and creamy texture. (2020-08-17)
Scientists use photons as threads to weave novel forms of matter
New research from the University of Southampton has successful discovered a way to bind two negatively charged electron-like particles which could create opportunities to form novel materials for use in new technological developments. (2020-08-17)
Linking sight and movement
Harvard researchers found that image-processing circuits in the primary visual cortex not only are more active when animals move freely, but that they receive signals from a movement-controlling region of the brain that is independent from the region that processes what the animal is looking at. (2020-08-14)
Digital content on track to equal half Earth's mass by 2245
As we use resources to power massive computer farms and process digital information, our technological progress is redistributing Earth's matter from physical atoms to digital information. (2020-08-11)
Prenatal depression alters child's brain connectivity, affects behavior
Altered brain connectivity may be one way prenatal depression influences child behavior, according to new research in JNeurosci. (2020-08-10)
Scientists introduce FlowRACS for high-throughput discovery of enzymes
Researchers from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have now developed a flow mode Raman-activated cell sorter (RACS), called FlowRACS, to support high-throughput discovery of enzymes and their cell factories, at the precision of just one microbial cell. (2020-08-07)
Metallic blue fruits use fat to produce color and signal a treat for birds
Researchers have found that a common plant owes the dazzling blue colour of its fruit to fat in its cellular structure, the first time this type of colour production has been observed in nature. (2020-08-06)
Algal symbiosis could shed light on dark ocean
New research has revealed a surprise twist in the symbiotic relationship between a type of salamander and the alga that lives inside its eggs. (2020-08-05)
Spectacular ultraviolet flash may finally explain how white dwarfs explode
For just the second time ever, astrophysicists have spotted a spectacular flash of ultraviolet (UV) light accompanying a white dwarf explosion. (2020-07-23)
Keeping pinto beans away from the dark side
New slow-darkening pinto bean varieties show benefits for farmers and consumers (2020-07-22)
Topological photonics in fractal lattices
Photonic topological insulators are currently a subject of great interest because of the features: insulating bulk and topological edge states. (2020-07-21)
Ultra-small, parasitic bacteria found in groundwater, moose -- and you
In research first published as a pre-print in 2018, and now formally in the journal Cell Reports, scientists describe their findings that Saccharibacteria within a mammalian host are more diverse than ever anticipated. (2020-07-21)
New insight into the origin of water on the earth
Scientists have found the interstellar organic matter could produce an abundant supply of water by heating, suggesting that organic matter could be the source of terrestrial water. (2020-07-17)
Exotic neutrinos will be difficult to ferret out
An international team tracking the 'new physics' neutrinos has checked the data of all the relevant experiments associated with neutrino detections against Standard Model extensions proposed by theorists. (2020-07-16)
Air pollution from wildfires linked to higher death rates in patients with kidney failure
Exposure to higher amounts of fine particulate air pollution was associated with higher death rates among patients with kidney failure. (2020-07-16)
Mystery about cause of genetic disease in horses
Warmblood fragile foal syndrome is a severe, usually fatal, genetic disease that manifests itself after birth in affected horses. (2020-07-15)
Bacteria with a metal diet discovered in dirty glassware
Newfound bacteria that oxidize manganese help explain the geochemistry of groundwater. (2020-07-15)
New NMR method enables monitoring of chemical reactions in metal containers
Scientists have developed a new method of observing chemical reactions in metal containers. (2020-07-15)
How galaxies die: New insights into the quenching of star formation
Astronomers studying galaxy evolution have long struggled to understand what causes star formation to shut down in massive galaxies. (2020-07-15)
Astrophysicists suggest carbon found in comet ATLAS help to reveal age of other comets
Astrophysicists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU, Russia), South Korea, and the USA appear in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, suggesting carbon indicates time comets have spent in the Solar System -- the less carbon, the longer they have been in the proximity of the Sun. (2020-07-13)
Viral dark matter exposed: Metagenome database detects phage-derived antibacterial enzyme
In a pioneer study published in Cell Host & Microbe - Researchers at Osaka City University and The Institute for Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, reported intestinal bacterial and viral metagenome information from the fecal samples of 101 healthy Japanese individuals. (2020-07-10)
Climate change: Heavy rain after drought may cause fish kills
Due to climate changes, many regions are experiencing increasingly warmer and dryer summers, followed by heavy rain. (2020-07-09)
Shining light into the dark
Curtin University researchers have discovered a new way to more accurately analyse microscopic samples by essentially making them 'glow in the dark', through the use of chemically luminescent molecules. (2020-07-09)
The story behind a uniquely dark, wetland soil
Areas where landslides are common make hydric soil identification tricky. (2020-07-08)
How does our brain fold? Study reveals new genetic insights
Problems with brain folding are linked with neurological conditions like autism, anorexia and schizophrenia, but there are currently no ways to detect, prevent or treat misfolding. (2020-07-01)
FAST detects neutral hydrogen emission from extragalactic galaxies for the first time
Recently, an international research team led by Dr. CHENG Cheng from Chinese Academy of Sciences South America Center for Astronomy (CASSACA) observed four extragalactic galaxies by using the FAST 19-beam receiver, and detected the neutral hydrogen line emission from three targets with only five minutes of exposure each. (2020-07-01)
Roadside hedges protect human health at the cost of plant health
Roadside hedges take a hit to their health while reducing pollution exposure for humans. (2020-06-30)
Case for axion origin of dark matter gains traction
In a new study of axion motion, researchers propose a scenario known as ''kinetic misalignment'' that greatly strengthens the case for axion/dark matter equivalence. (2020-06-26)
Wildfire smoke has immediate harmful health effects: UBC study
Exposure to wildfire smoke affects the body's respiratory and cardiovascular systems almost immediately, according to new research from the University of British Columbia's School of Population and Public Health. (2020-06-24)
Dynamical and allosteric regulation of photoprotection in light harvesting complex II
Thermal/acidity triggered formation of a pair of local α-helices from 310-helix E/loop and the C-terminal coil connecting helix D in the neighboring monomer induces a scissoring motion of transmembrane helix A and B, shifting the conformational equilibrium to a more open state as a protein switch. (2020-06-24)
Exotic mixtures
An international research team led by HZDR has now presented a new, very precise method of evaluating the behavior of mixtures of different elements under high pressure with the help of X-ray scattering. (2020-06-24)
Extending the coverage of PM2.5 monitoring to help improve air quality
A team of researchers in China has improved the method to obtain mass concentrations of particulate matter from widely measured humidity and visibility data. (2020-06-23)
Study finds 'dark matter' DNA is vital for rice reproduction
Researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have shed light on the reproductive role of 'dark matter' DNA - non-coding DNA sequences that previously seemed to have no function. (2020-06-19)
A new social role for echolocation in bats that hunt together
To find prey in the dark, bats use echolocation. Some species, like Molossus molossus, may also search within hearing distance of their echolocating group members, sharing information about where food patches are located. (2020-06-19)
Innovation by ancient farmers adds to biodiversity of the Amazon, study shows
Innovation by ancient farmers to improve soil fertility continues to have an impact on the biodiversity of the Amazon, a major new study shows. (2020-06-18)
During the COVID-19 outbreak in China, marked emission reductions, but unexpected air pollution
Using a combination of satellite and ground-based observations to study air pollution changes in China during COVID-19 lockdowns, researchers report up to 90% reductions of certain emissions, but also an unexpected increase in particulate matter pollution. (2020-06-17)
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