Current Data Mining News and Events

Current Data Mining News and Events, Data Mining News Articles.
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Deep seabed mining must benefit all humankind
As investors set their sights on the mineral resources of the deep seabed, the International Seabed Authority (ISA) is developing regulations that will govern their future exploration and possible exploitation. A new IASS Policy Brief, published in cooperation with the Federal Environment Agency (UBA), presents three recommendations to ensure that future deep seabed mining would be to the common benefit all humankind, as required by international law. (2021-02-18)

The effects of antidepressant drugs evaluated through the analysis of patients' tweet
Scientists have identified behavioural and linguistic changes in tweets in Spanish published by users suffering from depression and who are taking medication to treat this disease. (2021-02-12)

Online searches can help foreshadow future COVID-19 surges and declines, new study shows
Online searches for mobile and isolated activities can help to predict later surges and declines in COVID-19 cases, a team of researchers has found. Its findings, based on a four-month analysis of online searches, offer a potential means to anticipate the pathways of the pandemic--before new infections are reported. (2021-02-08)

Human activity caused the long-term growth of greenhouse gas methane
Decadal growth rate of methane in the atmosphere varied dramatically over the past 30 yeas with three distinct periods of slowed (1988-1998), quasi-stationary (1999-2006) and renewed (2007-2016) phases. An inverse analysis with atmospheric chemistry transport modeling explained these variations consistently. While emissions from oil and gas exploitation and natural climate events caused the slowed growth and the temporary pause, those from coal mining in China and livestock farming in the tropics drove the renewed growth. (2021-01-29)

Methane emissions from coal mines are higher than previously thought
Methane emissions from coal mines are likely higher than previously calculated, because of emissions from abandoned mines and higher content in deep coal seams. (2021-01-29)

Scholars reveal the changing nature of U.S. cities
New findings buck the historical view that most cities in the United States developed in similar ways. Using a century's worth of urban spatial data, researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder found a long history of urban size (how big a place is) ''decoupling'' from urban form (the shape and structure of a city), leading to cities not all evolving the same--or even close. (2021-01-28)

New research: Monitoring online posts by consumers could help improve food safety
An estimated 48 million cases of foodborne illness are contracted in the U.S annually, causing about 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths, according to CDC. In some instances, the source is well known, but 80 percent of food poisoning cases are of unknown origin. In a new study published by the journal Risk Analysis, proposes a new Food Safety Monitoring System that utilizes consumer comments posted on websites to identify products associated with food-related illnesses. (2021-01-26)

Microbiome Search Engine 2 helps researchers explore microbiome space
To correlate the newly developed microbiomes with existing data sets, researchers from the Qingdao Institute of BioEnergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and their collaborators developed the Microbiome Search Engine 2 (MSE 2). (2021-01-22)

Brazilian dam collapse could have been predicted with right monitoring technology
One of Brazil's worst environmental disasters - a dam collapse that also killed more than 200 people - could have been foreseen with latest satellite radar imaging technique, according to a new study by the University of Nottingham and Durham University. (2021-01-20)

Blockchain technology to optimize P2P energy trading
A research team of Tokyo Institute of Technology, in collaboration with Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, has developed a new technology an original blockchain technology that can optimize peer-to-peer (P2P) energy trading. The technology is expected to contribute to more effective use of surplus electricity from renewable energy by creating trading environments that flexibly respond to shared trading needs, particularly to maximize the amount of surplus electricity available in the market at any given time. (2021-01-19)

Scientists discover new 'spectacular' bat from West Africa
A group of scientists led by the American Museum of Natural History and Bat Conservation International have discovered a new species of a striking orange and black bat in a mountain range in West Africa. The species, which the researchers expect is likely critically endangered, underscores the importance of sub-Saharan 'sky islands' to bat diversity. The species is described today in the journal American Museum Novitates. (2021-01-13)

New statistical method exponentially increases ability to discover genetic insights
A test of the Sum-Share statistical method with only summary-level data found 1,734 genetic variations associated with cardiovascular-related conditions when just one had previously been likely. (2021-01-08)

Scientists suggested a way to measure soil properties at any depth without digging
A team of scientists from RUDN University and the Dokuchyaev Soil Science Institute developed a method for identifying the color of soil at different depths and the structure of soil profile using ground-penetrating radar. With this methodology, scientists can identify the chemical composition of the soil and classify it for potential use in construction, agriculture, or mining without digging soil sections. (2020-12-22)

Media Alert: The CRISPR Journal publishes special issue on expanding the CRISPR toolbox
A Special Issue on Expanding the CRISPR Toolbox. The Journal is dedicated to validating and publishing outstanding research and commentary on all aspects of CRISPR and gene editing, including CRISPR biology, technology, and genome editing, and commentary and debate of key policy, regulatory, and ethical issues affecting the field. (2020-12-18)

Two new studies offer ways to avert accidents and workplace injuries for American workers
Human error is a causal factor in up to 80 percent of workplace accidents. A new study measuring the eye movements and cognitive processes for at-risk workers, sheds new light on the potential to avert accidents and possibly prevent workplace injuries. The study 'Measuring attention, working memory, and visual perception to reduce risk of injuries in the construction industry,' by Behzad Esmaeili, Ph.D., George Mason University challenges the conventional, reactionary paradigm of safety-risk management (2020-12-17)

NUS engineers invent fast and safe way to store natural gas for useful applications
Engineers from NUS have devised a method to convert natural gas into a non-explosive solid form known as gas hydrates, which can be easily stored and transported. Using a novel, low-toxicity additive mixture, the conversion can be completed in just 15 minutes - the fastest time ever reported. (2020-12-02)

Electronic waste on the decline, new study finds
A new study, led by a researcher at the Yale School of the Environment's Center for Industrial Ecology and published recently in the Journal of Industrial Ecology, has found that the total mass of electronic waste generated by Americans has been declining since 2015. This surprising finding has ramifications for both how we think about electronic waste's future and for the laws and regulations regarding e-waste recycling, according to the study's authors. (2020-12-01)

Mine ponds amplify mercury risks in Peru's Amazon
The proliferation of pits and ponds created in recent years by miners digging for gold in Peru's Amazon has altered the landscape and amplified the risk of mercury poisoning, a new study shows. In some watersheds, there's been a 670% increase in land area covered by abandoned mining pits that have filled in with water. Low-oxygen conditions in these ponds accelerate the conversion of submerged mercury, a leftover from the mining, into highly toxic methylmercury. (2020-11-27)

Largest aggregation of fishes in abyssal deep sea recorded by UH researchers
The largest aggregation of fishes ever recorded in the abyssal deep sea was discovered by a team of oceanographers during an expedition in the Clarion Clipperton Zone. Their findings were published recently in Deep-Sea Research. (2020-11-23)

New tool predicts geological movement and the flow of groundwater in old coalfields
A remote monitoring tool to help authorities manage public safety and environmental issues in recently abandoned coal mines has been developed by the University of Nottingham. The tool uses satellite radar imagery to capture millimetre-scale measurements of changes in terrain height. Such measurements can be used to monitor and forecast groundwater levels and changes in geological conditions deep below the earth's surface in former mining areas. (2020-11-16)

Mining rocks in orbit could aid deep space exploration
The first mining experiments conducted in space could pave the way for new technologies to help humans explore and establish settlements on distant worlds, a study suggests. (2020-11-10)

Metal pollution in British waters may be threatening scallops, study reveals
Research, led by an interdisciplinary team at the University of York, suggests that the contamination of Isle of Man seabed sediments with zinc, lead and copper from the mining of these metals, which peaked on the island in the late 19th century, is causing the shells of king scallops to become significantly more brittle (2020-11-05)

Monitoring open-cast mines better than before
Mahdi Motagh from the German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ, in cooperation with Chinese scientists, has evaluated data from the Sentinel 1 satellite mission of the European Union's Copernicus program and thus demonstrated new possibilities for monitoring mining areas. The three researchers used a special radar method, the Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR), to investigate lignite regions in North Rhine-Westphalia in Germany. (2020-11-04)

Reforestation plans in Africa could go awry
An international team led by an UdeM researcher publishes the findings of a study on the biogeographical history of sub-Saharan Africa. (2020-10-28)

Cognitive disorders linked to severe COVID-19 risk
Dementia and other cognitive disorders now appear to be risk factors for developing severe COVID-19, according to research from the University of Georgia. (2020-10-28)

Tracing the source of illicit sand--can it be done?
If you've visited the beach recently, you might think sand is ubiquitous. But in construction uses, the perfect sand and gravel is not always an easy resource to come by. ''Not all sand is equal in terms of what it can be used for,'' notes Zack Sickman, coauthor of a new study to be presented on Thursday at the Geological Society of America annual meeting. (2020-10-28)

Scientists establish NanDeSyn Database to support international cooperation on industrial microalgae
To promote resource sharing and research cooperation for the synthetic biology and molecular breeding of industrial oil-producing microalgae, an international team led by Single-Cell Center (SCC), Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), has released the ''NanDeSyn Database'' (http://www.nandesyn.org). (2020-10-26)

Magnitude comparison distinguishes small earthquakes from explosions in US west
By comparing two magnitude measurements for seismic events recorded locally, researchers can tell whether the event was a small earthquake or a single-fire buried chemical explosion. (2020-10-13)

Deep-seabed mining lastingly disrupts the seafloor food web
Deep-seabed mining is considered a way to address the increasing need of rare metals. However, the environmental impacts are considered to be substantial but remain largely unknown and clear regulatory standards are lacking. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen, Germany, together with colleagues from The Netherlands, Belgium, Portugal, Germany and the UK, now describe that mining-related disturbances have a long-term impact on carbon flow and the microbial loop at the deep seafloor. (2020-10-08)

Sustainable space management at risk under US-centric policies
''Other nations need to speak up, now,'' argue Aaron Boley and Michael Byers in this Policy Forum, in response to U.S. policymakers' attempts to dominate commercial space mining based on a strategic interpretation of international space law. (2020-10-08)

Diamonds found with gold in Canada's Far North offer clues to Earth's early history
The presence of diamonds in an outcrop atop an unrealized gold deposit in Canada's Far North mirrors the association found above the world's richest gold mine, according to University of Alberta research that fills in blanks about the thermal conditions of Earth's crust three billion years ago. (2020-10-06)

In the arctic, extreme air pollution kills trees, limits growth by reducing sunlight
At the most heavily polluted site on Earth, dendroecology, dendrochemistry, and process-based forward modelling were used to explore the relationship of tree growth and mortality with industrial pollution. (2020-09-29)

Tree rings show scale of Arctic pollution is worse than previously thought
The largest-ever study of tree rings from Norilsk in the Russian Arctic has shown that the direct and indirect effects of industrial pollution in the region and beyond are far worse than previously thought. (2020-09-25)

'Save me Seymour!'
New international research led by Curtin University has found approximately a quarter of carnivorous plant species across the world may be at risk of extinction due to global climate change, illegal poaching, and the clearing of land for agriculture, mining and development. (2020-09-23)

Bolsonaro's Indigenous land mining policy a billion-dollar backfire
Research has found a proposal to regulate mining of Indigenous lands in Brazil's Amazon rainforest could affect more than 863,000 square kilometres of forest and harm the nation's economy. (2020-09-18)

Improved early psychosis detection system may halve risk in young people
Doctors have developed a new data mining method to detect many young people with emerging psychosis. The new methods, based on advanced data mining to pick up early risk sign from schools, hospitals, and general doctors, will be presented at the ECNP virtual congress, and is in press with a peer-reviewed journal. (2020-09-13)

More than 90% of protected areas are disconnected
Ongoing land clearing for agriculture, mining and urbanisation is isolating and disconnecting Earth's protected natural areas from each other, a new study shows. Lead author Michelle Ward, from The University of Queensland's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, said the findings were ''alarming''. (2020-09-11)

Urbanization and agriculture are land uses that most affect Brazil's rivers
A literature review by researchers affiliated with universities in Brazil and the United States produces the first ever nationwide survey of land use impacts on water quality, showing how a lack of planning may affect the availability of a natural resource that is already becoming scarce. (2020-09-09)

A.I. tool promises faster, more accurate Alzheimer's diagnosis
By detecting subtle differences in the way that Alzheimer's sufferers use language, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed an A.I. algorithm that promises to accurately diagnose Alzheimer's without the need for expensive scans or in-person testing. The software not only can diagnose Alzheimer's, at negligible cost, with more than 95 percent accuracy, but is also capable of explaining its conclusions, allowing physicians to double check the accuracy of its diagnosis. (2020-08-27)

Foiling illicit cryptocurrency mining with artificial intelligence
Los Alamos National Laboratory computer scientists have developed a new artificial intelligence (AI) system that may be able to identify malicious codes that hijack supercomputers to mine for cryptocurrency such as Bitcoin and Monero. (2020-08-20)

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