Current Dead Sea Scrolls News and Events

Current Dead Sea Scrolls News and Events, Dead Sea Scrolls News Articles.
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Glaciers accelerate in the Getz region of West Antarctica
Glaciers in West Antarctica are moving more quickly from land into the ocean, contributing to rising global sea levels. A 25-year record of satellite observations has been used to show widespread increases in ice speed across the Getz sector for the first time, with some ice accelerating into the ocean by nearly 50%. (2021-02-23)

'Missing ice problem' finally solved
During glacial periods, the sea level falls, because vast quantities of water are stored in the massive inland glaciers. To date, however, computer models have been unable to reconcile sea-level height with the thickness of the glaciers. (2021-02-23)

Protective ship coatings as an underestimated source of microplastic pollution
Shipping traffic can be a major source of microplastics, especially out in the open ocean. In a new study, a team of environmental geochemists from the University of Oldenburg (Germany) for the first time provides an overview of microplastics mass distribution in the North Sea. The scientists found that most of the plastic particles in water samples taken in the south-eastern North Sea originate from binders used in marine paints. Their hypothesis is that ships leave a kind of 'skid mark' in the water. (2021-02-23)

'Problem of missing ice' finally solved by movement of the earth's crust
An international team of scientists published a study in Nature Communications today. This new reconstruction revolutionizes what is thought about the global continental ice mass during the Last Ice Age. (2021-02-23)

A salt solution for desalinating brine
Solar-powered brine crystallization could alleviate the environmental impacts of seawater desalination. (2021-02-21)

HKUST decodes a deep-sea vent-endemic snail hologenome
A research team led by Prof. QIAN Peiyuan, Head and Chair Professor from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST)'s Department of Ocean Science and David von Hansemann Professor of Science, has discovered that Gigantopelta snail houses both sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and methane-oxidizing bacteria inside its esophageal gland cells (part of digestive system) as endosymbionts, disclosing a novel dual symbiosis system and the molecular adaptation to the extreme environment, gaining a new understanding of the origin of life on Earth. (2021-02-19)

Deep seabed mining must benefit all humankind
As investors set their sights on the mineral resources of the deep seabed, the International Seabed Authority (ISA) is developing regulations that will govern their future exploration and possible exploitation. A new IASS Policy Brief, published in cooperation with the Federal Environment Agency (UBA), presents three recommendations to ensure that future deep seabed mining would be to the common benefit all humankind, as required by international law. (2021-02-18)

New UCF study examines leeches for role in major disease of sea turtles in Florida
University of Central Florida researchers are homing in on the cause of a major disease of sea turtles, with some of their latest findings implicating saltwater leeches as a possible factor. The results, published recently in the journal Diseases of Aquatic Organisms, present the first evidence of a significant association between leeches and the disease in sea turtles, according to the researchers. (2021-02-18)

Bacteria and algae get rides in clouds
Human health and ecosystems could be affected by microbes including cyanobacteria and algae that hitch rides in clouds and enter soil, lakes, oceans and other environments when it rains, according to a Rutgers co-authored study. (2021-02-16)

Quantum leaps in understanding how living corals survive
A new imaging technique has been developed to improve our ability to visualize and track the symbiotic interactions between coral and algae in response to globally warming sea surface temperatures and deepening seawaters. (2021-02-15)

Scientists identify how harmless gut bacteria "turn bad"
An international team of scientists has determined how harmless E. coli gut bacteria in chickens can easily pick up the genes required to evolve to cause a life-threatening infection. Their study, published in Nature Communications, warns that such infections not only affect the poultry industry but could also potentially cross over to infect humans. (2021-02-12)

Increasing hurricane intensity around Bermuda linked to rising ocean temperatures
New research shows that hurricane maximum wind speeds in the subtropical Atlantic around Bermuda have more than doubled on average over the last 60 years due to rising ocean temperatures in the region. (2021-02-12)

Recommendations for regional action to combat marine plastic pollution
Millions of tonnes of plastic waste find their way into the ocean every year. A team of researchers from the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Potsdam has investigated the role of regional ocean governance in the fight against marine plastic pollution, highlighting why regional marine governance should be further strengthened as negotiations for a new global agreement continue. (2021-02-11)

Climate research: rapid formation of iodic particles over the Arctic
When sea ice melts and the water surface increases, more iodine-containing vapours rise from the sea. Scientists from the international research network CLOUD have now discovered that aerosol particles form rapidly from iodine vapours, which can serve as condensation nuclei for cloud formation. The CLOUD researchers, among them scientists from the Goethe University Frankfurt, fear a mutual intensification of sea ice melt and cloud formation, which could accelerate the warming of the Arctic and Antarctic. (2021-02-11)

UMass Amherst team helps demonstrate spontaneous quantum error correction
Published by the journal Nature, research co-authored by University of Massachusetts Amherst physicist Chen Wang, graduate students Jeffrey Gertler and Shruti Shirol, and postdoctoral researcher Juliang Li takes a step toward building a fault-tolerant quantum computer. They have realized a novel type of QEC where the quantum errors are spontaneously corrected. (2021-02-11)

What's the catch? Algal blooms influence fishing booms
The timing of phytoplankton blooms in the Red Sea could help determine next year's fish catch. (2021-02-10)

Low carbon transport at sea: Ferries voyage optimization in the Adriatic
What CO2 savings are potentially attainable through path optimization? How much can ferries' carbon intensity be decreased? What is the role of waves and currents? A new study led by the CMCC Foundation shows how the future least-CO2 ferry routes could look like. (2021-02-09)

An end to invasive biopsies?
Hebrew Unievrsity researchers have found a less invasive and more accurate options for diagnoses using a simple blood test that detects DNA fragments. (2021-02-08)

Mapping hotspots of undersized fish and crustaceans may aid sustainable fishing practices
The seafood fished out of certain areas of southern European seas is consistently too small to keep, shows a recent study. Catching and discarding these juvenile and undersized animals harms biodiversity and worsens overexploitation of fisheries. But identifying these regions may help prioritize where fishing restrictions are needed most. (2021-02-05)

Fossil pigments shed new light on vertebrate evolution
This new paper shows that melanin is more than just something that gives colour to the body. It played an important role in the evolution of warm-blooded animals and helped defined what birds and mammals look like today. By studying where melanin occurs in the body in fossils and modern animals researchers have produced the first model for how melanin has evolved over the last 500 million years. (2021-02-04)

Human-generated noise pollution dominates the ocean's soundscape
The soundscapes of the Anthropocene ocean are fundamentally different from those of pre-industrial times, becoming more and more a raucous cacophony as the noise from human activity has grown louder and more prevalent. (2021-02-04)

Potentially toxic plankton algae may play a crucial role in the future Arctic
As the sea ice shrinks in the Arctic, the plankton community that produces food for the entire marine food chain is changing. New research shows that a potentially toxic species of plankton algae that lives both by doing photosynthesis and absorbing food may become an important player in the Arctic Ocean as the future sea ice becomes thinner and thinner. (2021-02-03)

The Arctic Ocean was covered by a shelf ice and filled with freshwater
Scientists from Alfred Wegener Institute: ''We need to have a fresh look at the role of the Arctic Ocean.'' (2021-02-03)

Fish in warming Scottish seas grow faster but reach a smaller size
Researchers have found new evidence that global warming is affecting the size of commercial fish species, documenting for the first time that juvenile fish are getting bigger, as well as confirming that adult fish are getting smaller as sea temperatures rise. The findings are published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Applied Ecology. (2021-02-03)

The quick choice might be a choice-overload avoidance strategy
Making a choice quickly might appear effortless, but University at Buffalo research that measured cardiovascular responses in the moment of making a choice, rather than after-the-fact, suggests that the apparent swift certainty might instead be a defense from having to think too deeply about the choices being presented to them. (2021-02-03)

Significant cancer rates in California sea lions has major human health implications
20-plus years of data in newly released study by The Marine Mammal Center shows ocean pollutants is one of the leading causes of cancer in sea lions, and highlights how the exposure to environmental contaminants can fast-track the likelihood of humans developing virally caused cancers. (2021-02-02)

Sea level will rise faster than previously thought
There are two main elements to observe when assessing sea level rise. One is the loss of the ice on land and the other is that the sea will expand as it gets warmer. Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen have constructed a new method of quantifying just how fast the sea will react to warming. Former predictions of sea level have been too conservative, so the sea will likely rise more and faster than previously believed. (2021-02-02)

Sea ice kept oxygen from reaching deep ocean during last ice age
Extensive sea ice covered the world's oceans during the last ice age, which prevented oxygen from penetrating into the deep ocean waters, complicating the relationship between oxygen and carbon. (2021-02-02)

Antarctica's ice melt isn't consistent, new analysis shows
Antarctic ice is melting, contributing massive amounts of water to the world's seas and causing them to rise - but that melt is not as linear and consistent as scientists previously thought, a new analysis of 20 years' worth of satellite data indicates. (2021-02-01)

Algorithm for algal rhythms
Red Sea atlas of algal blooms reveals the need for more sustainable fish farming. (2021-01-31)

Arctic warming and diminishing sea ice are influencing the atmosphere
Researchers of the Institute for Atmospheric and Earth system research at the University of Helsinki have resolved for the first time, how the environment affects the formation of nanoparticles in the Arctic. The results give additional insight into the future of melting sea ice and the Arctic atmosphere. Until recent studies, the molecular processes of particle formation in the high Arctic remained a mystery. (2021-01-29)

Loggerhead sea turtles lay eggs in multiple locations to improve reproductive success
Although loggerhead sea turtles return to the same beach where they hatched to lay their eggs, a new study finds individual females lay numerous clutches of eggs in locations miles apart from each other to increase the chance that some of their offspring will survive. (2021-01-28)

Healthy lifespan analysis using nematodes
Researchers have developed an automated measurement system to assess healthy lifespan using nematodes. This system performs a mini-population analysis to classify specific populations of nematodes based on qualitative differences in lifespan. Since there are many similarities between the mechanisms that determine the lifespan of nematodes and humans, this system could make it easier to develop drugs and find foods that extend the healthy lifespan of humans. (2021-01-27)

Mangroves threatened by plastic pollution from rivers, new study finds
Mangrove ecosystems are at particular risk of being polluted by plastic carried from rivers to the sea. Fifty-four per cent of mangrove habitat is within 20 km of a river that discharges more than a tonne of plastic waste a year into the ocean, according to a new paper published in the journal Science of the Total Environment. Mangroves in southeast Asia are especially threatened by river-borne plastic pollution, the researchers found. (2021-01-26)

Ocean toxin a heartbreaking threat for sea otters
Heart disease is a killer threat for southern sea otters feasting on domoic acid in their food web, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis. Climate change projections indicate that toxic blooms and domoic acid exposure will continue to rise. (2021-01-26)

Arctic ocean expedition advances climate modeling
In-situ cloud, radiation, and surface energy budget data collected by a September 2014 expedition of the Japanese Research Vessel Mirai from a stationary point in the ice-free Arctic Ocean were used to investigate the skill of regional climate models. Although most near-surface meteorological parameters were adequately captured by most models, certain important discrepancies were identified, such as the failure to capture unstable low-level cloud stratification, and the partitioning of ice clouds and liquid clouds. (2021-01-26)

Deep-sea plastic accumulations by turbidity currents: NW South China sea
Benthic plastic litter is a main source of pollutants in oceans, but how it disperses is largely unknown. This study by Guangfa Zhong and Xiaotong Peng, published today in Geology, presents novel findings on the distribution patterns and dispersion mechanisms of deep-sea plastic waste in a submarined canyon located in the northwestern South China Sea. (2021-01-26)

Doctoral student leads paleoclimate study of precipitation and sea ice in Arctic Alaska
PhD candidate Ellie Broadman of Northern Arizona University's School of Earth and Sustainability developed and led a study in Arctic Alaska to investigate sea ice dynamics and their impact on circulation and precipitation patterns in Arctic Alaska on a long-term basis. She is the lead author on a paper detailing her team's findings, ''Coupled impacts of sea ice variability and North Pacific atmospheric circulation on Holocene hydroclimate in Arctic Alaska,'' recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2021-01-25)

Global ice loss increases at record rate
The rate at which ice is disappearing across the planet is speeding up, according to new research. And the findings also reveal that the Earth lost 28 trillion tonnes of ice between 1994 and 2017 - equivalent to a sheet of ice 100 metres thick covering the whole of the UK. (2021-01-25)

Climate change increases coastal blue carbon sequestration
Coastal wetlands are important ecosystems, especially in mitigating climate change. Prof. Faming Wang from South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Prof. Sanders from Southern Cross University,Australia worked together with several colleagues around the globe to examine coastal blue carbon burial rates. They showed that climate change will increase the carbon sequestration capacity of these systems around the world during this century. (2021-01-25)

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