Current Decision News and Events

Current Decision News and Events, Decision News Articles.
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Scientists developed a novel method of automatic soil mapping
A team of soil scientists developed a new approach to the automatic generation and updating of soil maps. Having applied machine learning technologies to a set of rules traditionally used by experts in manual mapping, the team obtained a highly accurate model that provides easy-to-interpret results. (2021-02-15)

Learning by observation reduces cognitive bias, research suggests
Research suggests that observing others' decision-making can teach people to make better decisions themselves. The research, co-authored by Professor Irene Scopelliti, Professor of Marketing and Behavioural Science, tested the effectiveness of a new debiasing training strategy and reports first evidence that watching others make decisions can improve our own decision making. (2021-02-11)

Learn what you live? Study finds watching others can reduce decision bias
New research finds first evidence that watching and learning from others can help reduce bias and improve decision-making. In business, the results could help improve hiring practices or increase cost savings. (2021-02-11)

How messenger substances influence individual decision-making
A research team of psychologists and physicists from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) and Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg investigated the neurobiological processes in various forms of decision-making. They report in the journal Nature Communications that a different ratio of two messenger substances affects short-term and long-term strategic decisions differently. (2021-02-10)

Making good decisions about COVID-19
In their article, Rode and Fischbeck note that many of the key decisions facing individuals, corporations and governments all depend on two basic values: the probability a person has the virus and the probability that person transmits the virus. (2021-02-09)

How humans can build better teamwork with robots
Nancy Cooke is a cognitive psychologist and professor of human systems engineering at the Polytechnic School at Arizona State University (ASU). She explores how an artificial intelligence agent can contribute to team communications failure, and how to improve those interactions, in her discussion at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). (2021-02-08)

The quick choice might be a choice-overload avoidance strategy
Making a choice quickly might appear effortless, but University at Buffalo research that measured cardiovascular responses in the moment of making a choice, rather than after-the-fact, suggests that the apparent swift certainty might instead be a defense from having to think too deeply about the choices being presented to them. (2021-02-03)

Risk analysis helps contend with uncertainty of in-person activities
People now have access to better real-time information about COVID-19 infection and transmission rates, but they still have to decide what is safe to do. A new model co-authored by mathematician John McCarthy at Washington University in St. Louis helps to contend with the uncertainty. (2021-01-28)

Is there a link between cashless payments and unhealthy consumption?
The widespread use of cashless payments including credit cards, debit cards, and mobile apps has made transactions more convenient for consumers. However, results from previous research have shown that such cashless payments can increase consumers' spending on unhealthy food. (2021-01-27)

Navigating uncertainty: Why we need decision theory during a pandemic
Modern decision theory can assist policymakers in critical times such as the COVID-19 crisis, argue Bocconi University's Massimo Marinacci and Valentina Bosetti in a paper coauthored by Nobel laureate Lars Peter Hansen (2021-01-22)

Deep learning helps predicting occult peritoneal metastasis in stomach cancer
A new study led by the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences shows that deep learning can help predicting the occult peritoneal metastasis in stomach cancer. It provides a novel and noninvasive approach for stomach cancer patients and may inform individualized surgical management of stomach cancer. (2021-01-07)

Traffic light system helps reduce clinical uncertainty, improve treatment decisions
A new study has found one in four clinical decisions made by physicians falls short of best practices, but when physicians reviewed a simple traffic light system prior to making a clinical decision, uncertainty was reduced by 70 per cent and treatment decisions improved. (2020-12-16)

Irrelevant information interferes with making decisions, new research reveals
According to new research from behavioral economist Ian Chadd, an assistant professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, irrelevant information or unavailable options often cause people to make bad choices. When both elements are present, the probability of a poor decision is even greater. Through an experiment involving 222 individual tests each consisting of more than 40 questions, Chadd's research revealed that decisions made in an environment of irrelevant information carry time, cognitive, and consequence costs. (2020-12-14)

'Boss' genes could save human hearts - and the reef
UQ researchers have revealed rare decision-making genes in cells, which control how cells develop and respond to stress caused by disease or their environment. Researchers hope that in the future, they may be able to block a cell's bad decisions to prevent disease. (2020-12-13)

Cost information increases utility of decision aids for shared decision making
Cost information, when paired with information about clinical treatment options, greatly enhances the value of shared decision making, reported a FAIR Health brief released today. This was among the lessons learned from a FAIR Health initiative presenting patient decision aids for shared decision making in palliative care scenarios, as described in the brief Cost Information Enhances Shared Decision Making: Lessons from FAIR Health's Shared Decision-Making Initiative. (2020-12-10)

Trained dogs might be able to detect people infected with COVID-19 by sniffing their sweat
Trained dogs might be able to detect people infected with COVID-19 by sniffing their sweat, according to a preliminary proof-of-concept study. (2020-12-10)

Focus on human factor in designing systems
A new study has found one of the challenges in designing systems that involve people interacting with technology is to tackle the human trait of overconfidence. (2020-12-08)

Study finds gamblers ignore important information when placing bet
People with gambling problems are less likely to consider important information that could prevent them from losing, according to new research published today from the UBC's Centre for Gambling Research. (2020-12-03)

RUDN University mathematician suggested new approach to cooperative game
A mathematician from RUDN University developed a matrix representation of set functions. This approach is vivid and easy to check, and it makes the calculations easier. Among other things, the new development can be applied to cooperative game theory. (2020-12-01)

Alpha animals must bow to the majority when they abuse their power
Democratic decision-making allows subordinate vulturine guineafowl to regain control over collective group actions when dominants have a monopoly over resources. (2020-11-26)

RUDN University research team of mathematicians suggested a new decision making algorithm
A research team from RUDN University developed an algorithm to help large groups of people make optimal decisions in a short time. They confirmed the efficiency of their model using the example of the market at which the outbreak of COVID-19 began. The model helped the administration and sellers agree on closing the market and reach a consensus about the sums of compensations in just three steps. (2020-11-25)

Measuring risk-taking - by watching people move computer mouses
How you move a computer mouse while deciding whether to click on a risky bet or a safe choice may reveal how much of a risk-taker you really are. Researchers found that people whose mouse drifted toward the safe option on the computer screen - even when they ended up taking the risky bet - may be more risk-averse than their choice would indicate. (2020-11-23)

Making the best decision: Math shows diverse thinkers equal better results
A Florida State University researcher found that networks that consisted of both impulsive and deliberate individuals made, on average, quicker and better decisions than a group with homogenous thinkers. (2020-11-16)

Physics can assist with key challenges in artificial intelligence
Two challenges in the field of artificial intelligence have been solved by adopting a physical concept introduced a century ago to describe the formation of a magnet during a process of iron bulk cooling. Using a careful optimization procedure and exhaustive simulations, researchers have demonstrated the usefulness of the physical concept of power-law scaling to deep learning. This central concept in physics has also been found to be applicable in AI, and especially deep learning. (2020-11-12)

Researchers urge healthcare providers to routinely ask patients about cannabis use
Healthcare providers should talk to patients about their cannabis use the same way they talk about other habits like smoking and drinking: routinely and without judgment. Marian Wilson, lead author on a new paper about shared decision-making in talking about cannabis use, says some studies have suggested cannabis use is beneficial to patients with chronic pain who are also using opioids, which is why many in that patient population are using cannabis or considering it. (2020-11-05)

New decision support tool can provide personalized antibiotic treatment recommendations
A new study led by researchers at the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute developed an algorithm that could greatly reduce use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in outpatient settings, a step toward reducing antibiotic resistance. The findings will be published online November 4, 2020 in Science Translational Medicine. (2020-11-04)

Harnessing the 'wisdom of crowds' can help combat antibiotic over prescription
A new study has demonstrated that using the 'wisdom of crowds' (also known as collective intelligence) of three or more medical prescribers, can improve decisions about antibiotic prescribing and help combat rising levels of antibiotic resistance. (2020-11-03)

Decision conflict before cancer surgery correlates with lower activity after surgery
Nearly one-third of cancer patients who decide to undergo surgery for their condition may have second thoughts, and this decision conflict may lead to less favorable treatment outcomes in both the near- and long-term, according to a team of investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital and Ariadne Labs. (2020-10-29)

Knowing the model you can trust - the key to better decision-making
As much of Europe is engulfed by a second wave of Covid-19, and track and trace struggles to meet demand, modelling support tools are being increasingly used by policymakers to make key decisions. Most notably, models have been used to predict the Covid-19 R0 rate - the average rate of secondary infections from a single infection, which has formed the basis for many lockdown decisions across the UK. (2020-10-23)

'Happy ending effect' can bias future decisions, say scientists
Our brains can't always reliably evaluate experiences that unfold over time. We tend to give disproportionate weight to the later part of an experience. This can lead to bad decisions when choosing whether to repeat an experience. (2020-10-19)

Happy endings trip up the brain's decision-making
The brain keeps track of the value of an experience as well as how it unfolds over time; overemphasizing the ending may trigger poor decision-making, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2020-10-19)

Safe sex or risky romance? Young adults make the rational choice
Eros, the fabled Greek god of love, was said to bring confusion and weaken the mind. New research, however, suggests that young adults are instead quite rational when it comes to selecting potential sexual partners. (2020-10-16)

Automatic decision-making prevents us harming others - new study
The processes our brains use to avoid harming other people are automatic and reflexive - and quite different from those used when avoiding harm to ourselves, according to new research. (2020-10-15)

New study reveals how the nervous system mutes or boosts sensory information to make behavioral deci
Fruit flies may be able to teach researchers a thing or two about artificial intelligence. (2020-10-15)

Nerve cell activity shows how confident we are
Should I or shouldn't I? The activity of individual nerve cells in the brain tells us how confident we are in our decisions. This is shown by a recent study by researchers at the University of Bonn. The result is unexpected - the researchers were actually on the trail of a completely different evaluation mechanism. The results are published in the journal Current Biology. (2020-10-09)

Novel digital dashboard improves cancer case review efficiency
Researchers at the MU School of Medicine partnered with Roche Diagnostics to evaluate a cloud-based product called NAVIFY® Tumor Board that integrates all relevant clinical data for a tumor board into a single digital dashboard accessible to everyone. During a 16-month clinical study of the dashboard, researchers found NAVIFY Tumor Board significantly reduced the amount of time doctors and nurses across multiple specialties spent preparing for tumor board meetings. (2020-10-08)

Electric clothes dryers: An underestimated source of microfiber pollution
Electric clothes dryers (tumble dryers) may be a hitherto unsuspected source of microfibers, widely emitting fibers from laundry into the environment through their vents, according to an experimental study. (2020-10-07)

New study reveals one way police officers can reduce shooting errors
In a new research paper published in Police Quarterly, University of Colorado Denver School of Public Affairs Assistant Professor Paul Taylor found officers can significantly improve shoot/no-shoot decisions by simply lowering the position of their firearm. (2020-10-05)

Men predominate in 85%+ COVID-19 decision-making/advisory bodies globally
Men predominate in more than 85% of COVID-19 decision-making and key advisory bodies around the globe, with gender parity in just 3.5%, reveals an analysis of the available data, published in the online journal BMJ Global Health. (2020-10-01)

Computer model explains altered decision making in schizophrenia
Scientists have built a computer 'brain circuit', or artificial neural network, that mirrors human decision-making processes and sheds light on how circuits might be altered in psychiatric diseases. (2020-09-29)

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