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Current Deforestation News and Events

Current Deforestation News and Events, Deforestation News Articles.
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Indigenous property rights protect the Amazon rainforest
One way to cut back on deforestation in the Amazon rainforest - and help in the global fight against climate change - is to grant more of Brazil's indigenous communities full property rights to tribal lands. (2020-08-10)
Remote islands: Stepping stones to understanding evolution
In a new study published in Evolution, researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) and collaborators from the University of the Ryukyus investigated evolutionary and ecological changes in ants in the South Pacific archipelago of Fiji to examine a controversial theory for how evolution occurs on islands. (2020-07-30)
COVID-19 provides rare opportunities for studying natural and human systems
Researchers at Stanford and other institutions hypothesize outcomes of the pandemic's unprecedented socioeconomic disruption and outline research priorities for advancing our understanding of humans' impact on the environment Watch related video: https://youtu.be/jd9Jb6OInlM (2020-07-29)
Amazonian Indigenous territories are crucial for conservation
A new study from the University of Helsinki shows that Indigenous territories represent around 45% of all the remaining wilderness areas in the Amazon, comprising an area of three times the surface of Germany. (2020-07-29)
Madagascar: New mouse lemur species discovered
Group of researchers, from six countries, identified, genetically and morphologically, a new population of rats (Microcebus) that inhabit the same forests as another usual species previously described. (2020-07-28)
Small-farm tech reduces deforestation, climate change
Small farms in Zambia that use the latest hybrid seed for maize, help reduce deforestation and tackle climate change in a new Cornell University study. (2020-07-23)
Climate shift, forest loss and fires -- Scientists explain how Amazon forest is trapped in a vicious circle
A new study, published in Global Change Biology, showed how the fire expansion is attributed to climate regime shift and forest loss. (2020-07-22)
Revealing Brazil's rotten agribusinesses
Groundbreaking study first to identify Brazil's 'bad apple' beef and soy producers, illegally chopping down forests to feed Europe's appetite; Researchers show that transparent data and science-based monitoring are the most potent weapons against illicit forest loss (2020-07-16)
The complex relationship between deforestation and diet diversity in the Amazon
As increasing areas of the Amazonian rainforest are converted into agricultural land, scientists are examining how this is linked with local communities' food access. (2020-07-07)
Gold mining restricts Amazon rainforest recovery
Gold mining significantly limits the regrowth of Amazon forests, greatly reducing their ability to accumulate carbon, according to a new study. (2020-06-29)
Ecosystem degradation could raise risk of pandemics
Environmental destruction may make pandemics more likely and less manageable, new research suggests. (2020-06-29)
Deforestation and land-clearing are taking a toll on Brazil's corn yield
Brazil is one of the top three producers of both soy and corn globally, and its agricultural sector accounts for one-fifth of the country's economy. (2020-06-29)
Tropical forest loss
A new study from the University of Delaware finds that tropical forest loss is increased by large-scale land acquisitions and that certain kind investment projects -- including tree plantations and plantations for producing palm oil and wood fiber -- are ''consistently associated with increased forest loss.'' (2020-06-23)
Protecting natural forest in oil palm plantations crucial for conservation
A study, led by the University of York, has found that patches of protected forest on oil palm plantations play an important role in helping to conserve endangered species including hornbill birds and dipterocarp trees. (2020-06-22)
Cash me outside: Transfers to the poor linked to eco-benefits
In a new study, researchers recently discovered that Indonesia's national anti-poverty program reduced deforestation by about 30%. (2020-06-12)
Study links malaria risk in deforestation hotspots to demand for agricultural commodities
The international trade in timber, tobacco, cocoa, coffee and cotton accounts for a high proportion of malaria risk in exporter countries, according to a collaborative study by scientists in Brazil and Australia published in Nature Communications. (2020-06-04)
How do land-use changes affect the spread of diseases between animals and people?
Most new viruses and other pathogens that arise in humans are transmitted from other animals, as in the case of the virus that causes COVID-19. (2020-06-03)
'Major gaps' in understanding how land-use changes affect spread of diseases
The quest to discover how new diseases -- such as Covid-19 -- emerge and spread in response to global land-use change driven by human population expansion still contains 'major gaps', researchers have claimed. (2020-06-03)
Global environmental changes leading to shorter, younger trees
Ongoing environmental changes are transforming forests worldwide, resulting in shorter and younger trees. (2020-05-28)
Why are we still failing to stop deforestation?
While national and international efforts to reverse the trend of deforestation have multiplied in recent years, there is still no clear evidence to suggest that these initiatives are actually working. (2020-05-25)
Madagascar copal: New dating for an Antropocene ancient resin
The known Madagascar copal is a more recent resin from what was thought -it has about a few hundred years- and trapped pieces in this material are not as palaeontological important as thought traditionally. (2020-05-19)
Sustainable palm oil? How environmental protection and poverty reduction can be reconciled
Palm oil is often associated with tropical deforestation above all else. (2020-05-19)
Secure land rights essential to protect biodiversity and cultures within indigenous lands
New research argues that legally protected large territories in Brazil are crucial to protect biodiversity and provide essential conditions for indigenous populations to maintain their traditional livelihoods. (2020-05-13)
Global trade in soy has major implications for the climate
The extent to which Brazilian soy production and trade contribute to climate change depends largely on the location where soybeans are grown. (2020-05-07)
Stopping deforestation: lessons from Colombia
A study of deforestation in Colombia by researchers from The University of Queensland has revealed some valuable insights which could be used to help slow deforestation in areas around the globe. (2020-05-01)
A study places the origin of a group of trees growing in Africa 50 million years ago
The research looked into the evolution of the Daniellia clade, a set of trees with environmental importance, and confirms that more than half its species are endangered (2020-04-29)
New energy strategy in Cameroon to help avert 28,000 deaths and reduce global temperatures
A new study, published in Environmental Health Perspectives, has found that clean cooking with liquified petroleum gas (LPG) could avert 28,000 premature deaths and reduce global temperatures through successful implementation of a new national household energy strategy in Cameroon. (2020-04-02)
The naming of the shrew
Researchers at Louisiana State University have discovered a new species of shrew, which they have named the hairy-tailed shrew, or Crocidura caudipilosa. (2020-03-11)
Smaller tropical forest fragments vanish faster than larger forest blocks
In one of the first studies to explicitly account for fragmentation in tropical forests, researchers report that smaller fragments of old-growth forests and protected areas experienced greater losses than larger fragments, between 2001 and 2018. (2020-03-11)
Is your coffee contributing to malaria risk?
Researchers at the University of Sydney and University of São Paulo, Brazil, estimate 20% of the malaria risk in deforestation hot spots is driven by the international trade of exports including: coffee, timber, soybean, cocoa, wood products, palm oil, tobacco, beef and cotton. (2020-03-09)
Destruction of an Atlantic rain forest fragment raises the local temperature
Brazilian researchers show that if 25% of a one-hectare forest remnant is cut down, the impact on the local climate will be a temperature increase of 1 °C. (2020-03-04)
More than 60% of Myanmar's mangroves has been deforested in the last 20 years: NUS study
New research from the National University of Singapore showed that between 1996 and 2016, substantial mangrove forests have been converted to agricultural use in Myanmar. (2020-03-03)
NUS-led study suggests mangrove forests provide cause for conservation optimism, for now
An international team of researchers led by Associate Professor Daniel Friess and Dr Erik Yando of the National University of Singapore has found that globally, mangrove loss rates have reduced by almost an order of magnitude between the late 20th and early 21st century -- from what was previously estimated at one to three per cent per year, to about 0.3 to 0.6 per cent per year, thanks in large part to successful mangrove conservation efforts. (2020-02-25)
New research shows that El Niño contributes to insect collapse in the Amazon
Hotter and drier El Niño events are having an alarming effect on biodiversity in the Amazon Rainforest and further add to a disturbing global insect collapse, scientists show. (2020-02-09)
Secondary forests provide deforestation buffer for old-growth primary forests
Currently, re-growing forests comprise roughly 21% of previously deforested areas in the Brazilian Amazon. (2020-02-06)
New research highlights how plants are slowing global warming
A new paper reveals how humans are helping to increase the Earth's plant and tree cover, which absorbs carbon from the atmosphere and cools our planet. (2020-01-31)
Increasing tropical land use is disrupting the carbon cycle
An international study led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden shows that the rapid increase in land use in the world's tropical areas is affecting the global carbon cycle more than was previously known. (2020-01-28)
Sustainability claims about rubber don't stick
Companies work hard to present an environmentally responsible image. How well do these claims stack up? (2020-01-22)
Research shows potential for zero-deforestation pledges to protect wildlife in oil palm
New research has found that environmental efforts aimed at eliminating deforestation from oil palm production have the potential to benefit vulnerable tropical mammals. (2020-01-20)
Climate may play a bigger role than deforestation in rainforest biodiversity
In a study on small mammal biodiversity in the Atlantic Forest, researchers found that climate may affect biodiversity in rainforests even more than deforestation does. (2020-01-17)
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