Current Dehydration News and Events

Current Dehydration News and Events, Dehydration News Articles.
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Scientists extract pigments from algae for food supplements
In the framework of the Chlorella microalgae cultivation process, the researchers obtained microalgae biomass with a high content of carotenoid pigments, which is suitable for the food industry through targeted cultivation. (2021-02-04)

Is your skin thirsty? Optoacoustic sensor measures water content in living tissue
Researchers from Skoltech and the University of Texas Medical Branch (US) have shown how optoacoustics can be used for monitoring skin water content, a technique which is promising for medical applications such as tissue trauma management and in cosmetology. (2021-01-15)

Bionic idea boosts lithium-ion extraction
Chinese researchers from Prof. WEN Liping's team at the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry and Prof. ZHANG Qianfan's team from Beihang University have recently made progress in the preparation and application of a bioinspired material that is capable of achieving controlled ion transport and sieving, especially for lithium-ion extraction. (2020-12-30)

Water may be an effective treatment for metabolic syndrome
Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have discovered that fructose stimulates the release of vasopressin, a hormone linked to obesity and diabetes. They also found that water can suppress the hormone and alleviate these conditions in mice. (2020-12-15)

Potential cholera vaccine target discovered
Investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital analyzed antibodies recovered from humans who survived cholera. Experiments showed that the antibodies block V. cholerae bacteria's motility. (2020-11-17)

Catalyzing a zero-carbon world by harvesting energy from living cells
Scientists from Nagoya University have achieved a breakthrough in converting energy-deficient metabolites to a biorenewable resource thanks to a versatile catalyst. (2020-11-12)

3D printed stents that treat inflammation
POSTECH Professor Dong-Woo Cho's research team develops bioink-loaded esophageal stents for treating radiation esophagitis. (2020-11-10)

Models for potential precursors of cells endure simulated early-Earth conditions
Membraneless compartments--models for a potential step in the early evolution of cells--have been shown to persist or form, disappear, and reform in predictable ways through multiple cycles of dehydration and rehydration. (2020-10-28)

Study shows how tiny compartments could have preceded cells
Researchers used Argonne's Advanced Photon Source to study membraneless compartments as they underwent wet-dry cycles, shedding light on prebiotic Earth. (2020-10-27)

Children with chronic kidney disease have outsized health burden
Chronically ill children with kidney disease may spend more time in the hospital, incur larger health care costs and have a higher risk of death compared to pediatric patients hospitalized for other chronic conditions, a new study suggests. (2020-10-20)

Nights warming faster than days across much of the planet
Global warming is affecting daytime and night-time temperatures differently - and greater night-time warming is more common than greater daytime warming worldwide - new research shows. (2020-09-30)

COVID-19: Lower incidence at high altitudes?
Despite recent reports of lower COVID-19 incidence among high-altitude populations, current data is insufficient to conclude that high altitude is protective against the SARS-CoV-2 virus. (2020-08-03)

How a crystalline sponge sheds water molecules
How does water leave a sponge? In a new study, scientists answer this question in detail for a porous, crystalline material made from metal and organic building blocks -- specifically, cobalt(II) sulfate heptahydrate, 5-aminoisophthalic acid and 4,4'-bipyridine. Using advanced techniques, researchers studied how this crystalline sponge changed shape as it went from a hydrated state to a dehydrated state. (2020-07-29)

How to repair your gut
In a world first, Monash University researchers have identified a key biomolecule that enhances the repair of your gut lining by prompting stem cells to regenerate damaged tissue. (2020-07-20)

Turmeric could have antiviral properties
Curcumin, a natural compound found in the spice turmeric, could help eliminate certain viruses, research has found. A study published in the Journal of General Virology showed that curcumin can prevent Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) - an alpha-group coronavirus that infects pigs - from infecting cells. At higher doses, the compound was also found to kill virus particles. (2020-07-17)

Dehydration increases amphibian vulnerability to climate change
Amphibians have few options to avoid the underappreciated one-two punch of climate change, according to a new study from Simon Fraser University researchers and others. Rising summer temperatures are also resulting in higher rates of dehydration among wet-skinned amphibians as they attempt to keep themselves cool. (2020-07-15)

Desert algae shed light on desiccation tolerance in green plants
Deserts of the US Southwest are extreme habitats for most plants, but, remarkably, microscopic green algae live there that are extraordinarily tolerant of dehydration. After completely drying out, the algae can become active and start photosynthesizing again within seconds of receiving a drop of water. Elena Peredo and Zoe Cardon of the Marine Biological Laboratory provide a genetic explanation for the algae's resilience, a new perspective that warrants investigation in plants more generally. (2020-07-06)

Osmotic stress identified as stimulator of cellular waste disposal
Cellular waste disposal, where autophagy and lysosomes interact, performs elementary functions, such as degrading damaged protein molecules, which impair cellular function, and reintroducing the resulting building blocks such as amino acids into the metabolic system. This recycling process is known to keep cells young and, for instance, protects against protein aggregation, which occurs in neurodegenerative diseases. But what, apart from starvation, actually gets this important system going? Researchers have now discovered a previously unknown mechanism. (2020-06-29)

Virtually captured
The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) takes only 100 milliseconds to trap its prey. Once their leaves, which have been transformed into snap traps, have closed, insects can no longer escape. Using biomechanical experiments and virtual Venus flytraps a team from Freiburg Botanical Garden and the University of Stuttgart has analyzed in detail how the lobes of the trap move. (2020-06-23)

Diabetic ketoacidosis threatens hospitalized patients with COVID-19
Diabetic ketoacidosis is a common and potentially fatal complication in hospitalized patients with COVID-19, according to a new clinical perspective published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2020-06-18)

Water loss in northern peatlands threatens to intensify fires, global warming
A group of 59 international scientists, led by researchers at Canada's McMaster University, has uncovered new information about the distinct effects of climate change on boreal forests and peatlands, which threaten to worsen wildfires and accelerate global warming. (2020-05-11)

New material could turn clothing into a health monitor
Researchers have reported a new material, pliable enough to be woven into fabric but imbued with sensing capabilities that can serve as an early warning system for injury or illness. (2020-03-04)

Electrolyte supplements don't prevent illness in athletes, study finds
Electrolyte supplements popular with endurance runners can't be relied on to keep essential sodium levels in balance, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and their collaborators. (2020-02-25)

Donkeys are natural heat lovers and prefer Bethlehem to Britain
We might associate donkeys with Christmas, but new research from the University of Portsmouth shows the animals are keener on hotter periods of the year. Donkeys, it seems, love sun and warmth. That's the finding of the first study to examine the conditions under which healthy (non-working) donkeys and mules seek shelter in hot, dry climates. (2019-12-17)

Hydration may affect cognitive function in some older adults
Among women, lower hydration levels were associated with lower scores on a task designed to measure motor speed, sustained attention, and working memory. They did not find the same result for men. (2019-12-12)

OSIRIS-REx cameras capture particle ejection from asteroid Bennu
Cameras aboard NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft captured close-up shots of material being ejected from the surface of the near-Earth asteroid Bennu. The images offer a detailed look at small-scale mass loss events on an active asteroid, whereas before, observations have been limited to only the largest phenomena. (2019-12-05)

Bio-inspired hydrogel can rapidly switch to rigid plastic
A new material that stiffens 1,800-fold when exposed to heat could protect motorcyclists and racecar drivers during accidents. (2019-12-03)

Children's race may play role in treatment for acute gastroenteritis in emergency departments
New research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics 2019 National Conference & Exhibition suggests that the treatment children receive in US emergency departments for acute gastroenteritis with dehydration, a common childhood illness, may differ based on their race. (2019-10-25)

Biomedical sciences researchers isolate gut bacteria that can prevent and cure rotavirus infection
The presence of specific microbiota, or microorganisms that live in the digestive tract, can prevent and cure rotavirus infection, which is the leading cause of severe, life-threatening diarrhea in children worldwide, according to a new study by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. (2019-10-10)

How to keep cool in a blackout during a heatwave
If there is no power for air-conditioning, and tap water is the only resource available, spreading it across the skin is the best way to prevent the body overheating irrespective of the climate, according to a new study from the University of Sydney. (2019-10-08)

Best medications to reduce drooling for those with developmental disability
A new study has revealed the most effective medications to reduce drooling in young people with a developmental disability, which can affect their socialisation, relationships and community life. (2019-09-30)

Study shows how salamanders harness limb regeneration to buffer selves from climate change
Clemson University College of Science researchers have shown for the first time that salamanders inhabiting the Southern Appalachian Mountains use temperature rather than humidity as the best cue to anticipate changes in their environment. Significantly, they observed that these salamanders actually harness their unique ability to regenerate limbs to rapidly minimize the impact of hot temperatures. The findings may have implications for other animals and even plants. (2019-09-10)

Electronic dance music party-goers at increased risk for drug-related emergencies
People who frequent electronic dance music (EDM) parties often use multiple drugs simultaneously and experience adverse effects with some ending up in the emergency department, say researchers at New York University School of Medicine and Rutgers University. (2019-08-21)

Opioid prescribing patterns in children after tonsillectomy
National private insurance claims data were used to examine opioid prescribing patterns in children after tonsillectomy and return visits for complications. Opioids are commonly used after tonsillectomy, although American Academy of Otolaryngology clinical practice guidelines recommend nonopioids such as NSAIDs. This analysis included 2016 and 2017 claims data coded for tonsillectomy for nearly 16,000 children; nearly 60% of whom had one or more prescription drug claims for opioids between seven days before to one day after tonsillectomy. (2019-08-08)

Six in 10 children receive opioids after tonsillectomy
Sixty percent of privately insured children undergoing tonsil removal received opioids -- with average prescriptions lasting about six to 10 days -- a new study finds. (2019-08-08)

Is it safe to use an electric fan for cooling?
The safety and effectiveness of electric fans in heatwaves depend on the climate and basing public health advice on common weather metrics could be misleading, according to a new study from the University of Sydney. (2019-08-05)

Photocatalytic generation of highly reactive alkynes under visible light conditions
In a recent study published in Organic Letters, researchers at Kanazawa University developed a method to generate a highly reactive alkyne, an organic molecule having a C≡C triple bond, from a cyclopropenone, an organic molecule having a strained three membered ring, using a visible light responsive photocatalyst. (2019-08-01)

Hydration sensor could improve dialysis
Researchers from MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital have now developed a portable sensor that can accurately measure patients' hydration levels using a technique known as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. (2019-07-24)

People are more likely to try drugs for the first time during the summer
American teenagers and adults are more likely to try illegal or recreational drugs for the first time in the summer, a new study shows. (2019-07-23)

The art of sensing within the skin
The art of tattooing may have found a diagnostic twist. A team of scientists in Germany have developed permanent dermal sensors that can be applied as artistic tattoos. As detailed in the journal Angewandte Chemie, a colorimetric analytic formulation was injected into the skin instead of tattoo ink. The pigmented skin areas varied their color when blood pH or other health indicators changed. (2019-07-18)

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