Current Delirium News and Events

Current Delirium News and Events, Delirium News Articles.
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Researchers ID blood protein that sheds light on common, post-operative complication
In a new study led by an interdisciplinary team of gerontologists, geriatricians, precision medicine experts, and bioinformaticians at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), researchers identified a single protein present in the blood that is associated with increased risk of post-operative delirium. (2021-02-17)

Researchers find delirium in hospitalized patients linked to mortality, disability
Delirium, a form of acute brain dysfunction, is widespread in critically ill patients in lower resourced hospitals, and the duration of delirium predicted both mortality and disability at six months after discharge, according to a study published in PLOS ONE. (2021-02-11)

MSK researchers learn what's driving 'brain fog' in people with COVID-19
A unique collaboration among experts from several areas within MSK leads to findings about how inflammation appears to be driving the neurologic effects seen in some COVID-19 patients. (2021-02-08)

Study finds recommended ICU sedatives equally safe, effective
A study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine provides the most definitive evidence to date that, of the two drugs recommended for light sedation of patients receiving mechanical ventilation in the ICU, one is as effective and safe as the other. (2021-02-02)

Large study finds higher burden of acute brain dysfunction for COVID-19 ICU patients
COVID-19 patients admitted to intensive care in the early months of the pandemic were subject to a significantly higher burden of delirium and coma than is typically found in patients with acute respiratory failure. Choice of sedative medications and curbs on family visitation played a role in increasing acute brain dysfunction for these patients. (2021-01-08)

Nursing homes may misinterpret mental changes, falls as infection
There is a widespread belief that a change in the mental status or an increase in falls in a nursing home resident may indicate an underlying infection. This contributes to the overuse of antibiotics, according to revised clinical guidance by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The guidance, published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, outlines criteria on evaluating non-localizing symptoms as indicators of infection. (2020-12-09)

Delirium in older patients with COVID-19
How frequently older adults with COVID-19 present to the emergency department with delirium was examined in this observational study. (2020-11-19)

Study shows delirium can signal presence of COVID-19 in asymptomatic older patients in ED
A study published today in JAMA Network Open/Emergency Medicine supports evidence that older persons admitted to emergency departments (ED), and subsequently diagnosed positive for COVID-19, often present with delirium when they show no other typical COVID-19 symptoms, such as fever and cough. (2020-11-19)

Best practices for mechanical ventilation in patients with ARDS, COVID-19
A team from pulmonary and critical care medicine at Michigan Medicine outlines 20 evidence-based practices shown to reduce time spent on a ventilator and death in patients with acute respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress -- conditions that have many overlaps with severe COVID-19. (2020-11-13)

Ohio State study finds playing brain games before surgery helps improve recovery
A new study by led by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and The Ohio State University College of Medicine finds that exercising your brain with ''neurobics'' before surgery can help prevent post-surgery delirium. Essentially, your brain can be prepared for surgery, just as the body can, by keeping your mind active and challenged, according to findings published online in the journal JAMA Surgery. (2020-11-11)

Delirium could be an early marker of COVID-19
Delirium accompanied by fever could be an early symptom of COVID-19. This is the main conclusion drawn by a scientific research review carried out by researchers from the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) and published in the open access Journal of Clinical Immunology and Immunotherapy, which highlights the fact that, together with the loss of the senses of taste and smell and headaches that occur in the days prior to the manifestation of coughing and breathing difficulties, some patients also develop delirium. (2020-11-04)

Immune response the probable underlying cause of neural damage in COVID-19
It is probably the immune response to, rather than the virus in itself, that causes sudden confusion and other symptoms from the nervous system in some patients with COVID-19. This is shown by a study of cases involving six Swedish patients, now published in the journal Neurology. (2020-10-22)

'Brain fog' following COVID-19 recovery may indicate PTSD
A new report suggests that lingering ''brain fog'' and other neurological symptoms after COVID -19 recovery may be due to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), an effect observed in past human coronavirus outbreaks such as SARS and MERS. (2020-10-06)

Program to improve outcomes for geriatric surgery patients shows promise
A beta test of a program for older adults who undergo major surgery has resulted in shorter hospital stays and lower rates of post-surgery delirium, among other improved outcomes. (2020-10-03)

Delirium a key sign of COVID-19 in frail, older people
A new analysis of data from researchers at King's College London using information from the COVID Symptom Study app and patients admitted to St Thomas' Hospital in London, has shown that delirium - a state of acute confusion associated with a higher risk of serious illness and death - is a key symptom of COVID-19 in frail, older people. (2020-09-30)

Living in disadvantaged neighborhoods doubles post-op delirium risk for older adults
Where you live can increase your risk for experiencing delirium after surgery. So said a study that showed older adults who live in the most disadvantaged neighborhoods are two times more likely to experience delirium after surgery than their counterparts from more affluent communities. (2020-08-31)

Does having Alzheimer's disease and dementia affect severity of delirium?
Recently, researchers published findings from the Better Assessment of Illness (BASIL) study, in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. They created the study to examine delirium, severe delirium, and its aftermath. (2020-07-17)

Scientists find new link between delirium and brain energy disruption
Scientists have discovered a new link between impaired brain energy metabolism and delirium -- a disorienting and distressing disorder particularly common in the elderly and one that is currently occurring in a large proportion of patients hospitalized with COVID-19. The research suggests that therapies focusing on brain energy metabolism may offer new routes to mitigating delirium. (2020-07-14)

Is delirium associated with long-term cognitive decline?
The results of 23 studies were combined to examine whether an episode of delirium is a risk factor for long-term cognitive decline. (2020-07-13)

Delirium may cause long term cognitive decline
A new meta-analysis of 24 observational studies from researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons found that delirium may cause significant long-term cognitive decline. (2020-07-13)

Columbia physicians give first comprehensive review of COVID-19's effects outside the lung
Based on their experience treating COVID-19, Columbia physicians have assembled critical information about the coronavirus's effects on organs outside the lungs. (2020-07-10)

Researchers work to better measure delirium severity in older patients
In a study published in Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorder, researchers reported on their effort to improve and validate tools used to assess the severity of a condition called delirium, an acute confusional state often experienced by older hospitalized patients. (2020-07-08)

COVID-19 brain complications found across the globe
Cases of brain complications linked to COVID-19 are occurring across the globe, a new review by University of Liverpool researchers has shown. Published in The Lancet Neurology, the study found that strokes, delirium and other neurological complications are reported from most countries where there have been large outbreaks of the disease. (2020-07-08)

Increase in delirium, rare brain inflammation and stroke linked to COVID-19
Neurological complications of Covid-19 can include delirium, brain inflammation, stroke and nerve damage, finds a new UCL and UCLH-led study, published in the journal Brain. (2020-07-07)

The Lancet Psychiatry: Study finds few immediate mental health effects of COVID-19, but longer-term impact must be considered
Most people admitted to hospital with severe COVID-19 should recover without experiencing mental illness if infection with SARS-CoV-2 follows a similar course to the coronavirus epidemics of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002 and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) in 2012, according to the first systematic review and meta-analysis looking at the psychiatric consequences of coronavirus infections in over 3,550 patients hospitalised with SARS, MERS, and COVID-19, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. (2020-05-18)

Coronavirus infections may lead to delirium and potentially PTSD
People taken ill by coronavirus infections may experience psychiatric problems while hospitalized and potentially after they recover, suggests an analysis of past research led by the UCL Institute of Mental Health with King's College London collaborators, published in The Lancet Psychiatry. (2020-05-18)

Flying foxes in SA exposed to zoonotic viruses
University of Adelaide researchers have found that South Australia's population of Grey-headed flying foxes, which took up residence in 2010, has been exposed to a number of viruses, including Hendra virus that can be transmitted to humans via horses. But they have not found evidence of exposure to Australian bat lyssavirus. (2020-05-11)

In wake of COVID-19 pandemic, a crashing wave of neuropsychiatric problems?
Researchers suggest that in the aftermath of the novel coronavirus pandemic, a host of neuropsychiatric challenges may remain -- or emerge -- for those recovering from COVID-19 infections. (2020-04-14)

Music shows promise in decreasing delirium in critically ill patients
Mechanically ventilated ICU patients -- more than a million adults annually in the US -- are at increased risk for delirium, which is associated with prolonged ICU stays, higher healthcare costs and increased mortality. A study from Indiana University School of Medicine and Regenstrief Institute researchers reports that music appears to decrease delirium in ICU patients on mechanical ventilators. (2020-03-10)

'Start low, go slow' still applies for pain management, especially for older patients
Chronic pain affects a large proportion of older adults and most long-term care residents. Managing chronic pain effectively is essential but challenging, and it has been complicated by concerns about opioid abuse. (2020-03-02)

Why Edgar Allan Poe probably did not kill himself
A computational analysis of language used by the writer Edgar Allan Poe has revealed that his mysterious death was unlikely to have been suicide. The author, poet, and literary critic died in 1849 after spending several days in hospital while in a state of delirium. To date, Poe's death remains an unsolved enigma, with his contemporary, poet Charles Baudelaire even speculating that the incident was 'almost a suicide, a suicide prepared for a long time.' (2020-02-24)

Elder-friendly care after emergency surgery greatly improves outcomes for older patients
Tailoring care for older patients who have had emergency surgery can reduce complications and deaths, decrease the length of hospital stays and cut down on the need for alternate care at discharge, according to a new study led a University of Alberta researcher. (2020-02-18)

Scientists isolate biomarkers that can identify delirium risk and severity
Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine researchers have identified blood-based biomarkers associated with both delirium duration and severity in critically ill patients. This finding opens the door to easy, early identification of individuals at risk for longer delirium duration and higher delirium severity and could potentially lead to new treatments of this brain failure for which drugs have been shown to be largely ineffective. (2020-01-22)

New study suggests cautions about antipsychotic medications for hospitalized older adults
Delirium (sudden confusion or a rapid change in mental state) affects 15-26% of hospitalized older adults. Antipsychotic medicines are among the few therapeutic options to ease delirium and protect patients and caregivers -- but they also come with risks of their own. To learn more about the effect of antipsychotic medicines on older hospitalized patients, a research team studied information from hospitalized patients at a large academic medical center in Boston. (2020-01-06)

Treating more than just the heart is critical for geriatric patients
Geriatric conditions such as frailty, cognitive impairment, taking multiple medications and having multiple medical conditions complicate care for older people with acute cardiovascular diseases. Most research on how to treat acute cardiovascular conditions was conducted with younger people and may not apply to older patients. (2019-12-09)

Predicting vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease and delirium
A paper published today in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) shed new light on a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease that may indirectly influence patients' risk of postoperative delirium. (2019-11-22)

Examining muscle relaxant dose, risk of encephalopathy in patients with CKD
Whether a higher or lower dose of the muscle relaxant baclofen was associated with 30-day risk of hospitalization with encephalopathy (defined as a main diagnosis of delirium, disorientation, transient alteration of awareness, transient ischemic attack or an unclear diagnosis of dementia) among newly prescribed patients with chronic kidney disease was the focus of this observational study with nearly 16,000 older adults. (2019-11-09)

ACS NSQIP surgical risk calculator predicts outcomes for geriatric surgical patients
The NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator can now accurately predict four specific quality-of-life outcomes that transcend traditional measures of successful surgery, such as complication and mortality rates, and now reflects the expected effects of surgery on the ability of older patients to function independently. (2019-10-29)

Family members can assist in preventing post-operative delirium by as much as 16.8%
In a study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers reported that training family members in delirium prevention approaches can significantly reduce the incidence of post-operative delirium by up to 16.8 percent within seven days after surgery. This is important because delirium, a sudden change in mental status, or sudden confusion often occurring after major surgery, acute illness, or hospitalization, can have serious complications like functional and cognitive decline, prolonged hospital stays, institutionalization, and death. (2019-10-21)

Melatonin may not help prevent delirium after heart surgery
Delirium is observed in approximately 15% of hospitalised older adults, and it is more common in the critically ill and in those undergoing major surgery, such as heart surgery. Studies have found that blood levels of melatonin, a serotonin-derived hormone, decrease following surgery and are lower in surgical patients who develop delirium. A new study published in the Journal of the American Geriatric Society found that melatonin treatment did not influence the risk of developing delirium following heart surgery, however. (2019-10-09)

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