Current Dementia News and Events

Current Dementia News and Events, Dementia News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
A new study shows the relationship between surgery and Alzheimer's disease
Amsterdam, January 21, 2021 - A new study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease carried out by researchers at the Marqués de Valdecilla-IDIVAL University Hospital, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Bonn Medical Center, proposes that major surgery is a promoter or accelerator of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The first author of the publication was Carmen Lage and the principal investigator Pascual Sánchez-Juan. (2021-01-21)

Abnormal hyperactivation in the brain may be an early sign of Alzheimer's
A research team led by UdeM psychology and neuroscience professor Sylvie Belleville has just targeted an early biomarker of the disease. (2021-01-21)

Eye tests predict Parkinson's-linked cognitive decline 18 months ahead
Simple vision tests can predict which people with Parkinson's disease will develop cognitive impairment and possible dementia 18 months later, according to a new study by UCL researchers. In a related study, the researchers also found that structural and functional connections of brain regions become decoupled throughout the entire brain in people with Parkinson's disease, particularly among people with vision problems. (2021-01-19)

Approximately half of AD dementia cases are mild, one-fifth are severe
What percent of patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) currently have severe dementia? Do more people have mild disease? Or are the majority suffering with moderate dementia? A new study using data from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) sheds light on these trends. (2021-01-13)

A prognostic Alzheimer's disease blood test in the symptom-free stage
Using a blood test, a German-Dutch research team has predicted the risk of Alzheimer's disease in people who were clinically diagnosed as not having Alzheimer's disease but who perceived themselves as cognitively impaired (Subjective Cognitive Declined, SCD). The researchers analyzed blood samples from an SCD cohort supervised at the Alzheimer Center Amsterdam. Using a test developed in Bochum, they identified all 22 subjects at study entry who developed Alzheimer's dementia, thus the clinical symptoms, within six years. (2021-01-06)

ADDF presents vision of a consortium to accelerate research into speech and language biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease
In a commentary in Exploration in Medicine, Alzheimer's experts lay out a vision for a worldwide research consortium that can give clinicians -- and patients -- the answers to which speech and language changes may signal Alzheimer's in the form of digital biomarkers. (2021-01-05)

People in rural areas less likely to receive specialty care for neurologic conditions
A new study has found that while the prevalence of neurologic conditions like dementia, stroke, Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis (MS) is consistent across the U.S., the distribution of neurologists is not, and people in more rural areas may be less likely to receive specialty care for certain neurologic conditions. The study, funded by the American Academy of Neurology, is published in the December 23, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-12-23)

Scientists discover mutations associated with early onset dementia
Scientists at Trinity College Dublin today announced a significant advance in our understanding of an early onset form of dementia that may also progress our understanding of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. Adult onset Leukoencephalopathy with axonal Spheroids and Pigmented glia (ALSP) is an ultra-rare condition that manifests initially with psychiatric and behavioural changes in patients followed by a rapid progression of dementia in the third or fourth decade of life. (2020-12-22)

Development of plaques in Alzheimer's disease resolved
In Alzheimer's disease patients, the protein amyloid-beta (Aβ) clumps up in the brain to form so-called fibrils. This has a toxic effect on the surrounding nerve cells. It is believed that immune cells compact the Aβ fibrils into what are known as plaques. It is now possible to track the development of these microscopically small structures in human using infrared microscopy. (2020-12-21)

'Race norming' blamed for denying payouts to ex-NFL players with dementia
A UCSF clinical psychologist has taken aim at the National Football League (NFL) for ''race norming'' black players diagnosed with dementia, a practice that is depriving them of the monetary awards allocated to former footballers with neurodegenerative disorders. (2020-12-21)

Hearing loss and high blood sugar linked to poorer learning and memory among older Latinos
Researchers report that hearing loss and high blood sugar are associated with poor cognitive performance among middle-aged and older Latinos. (2020-12-17)

Better heart health scores in midlife linked to lower risk of late-life dementia
A long-term study of 1,449 people in Finland found that those who had better scores on standard metrics of cardiovascular health in midlife, especially for behavioral factors such as smoking, had a lower risk of dementia later in life. Yajun Liang of Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine. (2020-12-15)

Apathy could predict onset of dementia years before other symptoms
Apathy -- a lack of interest or motivation -- could predict the onset of some forms of dementia many years before symptoms start, offering a 'window of opportunity' to treat the disease at an early stage, according to new research from a team of scientists led by Professor James Rowe at the University of Cambridge. (2020-12-14)

Mystery solved with math: cytoplasmic traffic jam disrupts sleep-wake cycles?
KAIST mathematicians and their collaborators at Florida State University have identified the principle of how aging and diseases like dementia and obesity cause sleep disorders. A combination of mathematical modelling and experiments demonstrated that the cytoplasmic congestion caused by aging, dementia, and/or obesity disrupts the circadian rhythms in the human body and leads to irregular sleep-wake cycles. This finding suggests new treatment strategies for addressing unstable sleep-wake cycles. (2020-12-11)

Testing memory over four weeks could predict Alzheimer's disease risk
New research suggests testing people's memory over four weeks could identify who is at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease before it has developed. Importantly, the trial found testing people's ability to retain memories for longer time periods could predict this more accurately than classic memory tests, which test memory over half an hour. (2020-12-10)

Genetic differences important in Alzheimer's diagnosis
The two used methods for detecting amyloid pathology in Alzheimer's disease do not give unambiguous results, with the risk of incorrect or delayed care interventions. Now, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have found genetic explanations for the differences. The study is published in Molecular Psychiatry and may be important for more individual diagnostics and the development of future drugs. (2020-12-10)

Alzheimer Europe sets out future vision of EU dementia policy
Alzheimer Europe has launched a new report 'Dementia as a European Priority - A Policy Overview' which takes stock of dementia policy at an EU level and sets out recommendations for future priorities across Europe. (2020-12-09)

Blood test for alzheimer's disease predicts future cognitive decline in healthy people
In Nature Communications, the authors report that baseline NT1 levels in the blood were highly predictive of the risk of cognitive decline and AD dementia. (2020-12-09)

Caregiver burden in dementia during the COVID19 crisis
Caregivers of people with dementia and milder forms of neurocognitive disorder bear a heavy burden. They are constantly confronted with challenging symptoms and behaviors and feel they are up against their limits. The latest results from a study indicate that the COVID 19 crisis affects this burden since the pandemic has mental health implications (2020-12-07)

NIH researchers link cases of ALS and FTD to a Huntington's disease-associated mutation
A study led by researchers at the National Institutes of Health has made a surprising connection between frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), two disorders of the nervous system, and the genetic mutation normally understood to cause Huntington's disease. This large, international project, which included a collaboration between the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the National Institute on Aging (NIA), opens a potentially new avenue for diagnosing and treating some individuals with FTD or ALS. (2020-12-04)

New childhood dementia insight
Is the eye a window to the brain in Sanfilippo syndrome, an untreatable form of childhood-onset dementia, Australian researchers ask in a new publication. The findings of the NHMRC-funded project, just published in international journal Acta Neuropathologica Communications, highlight the potential for using widely available retinal imaging techniques to learn more about brain disease and monitor treatment efficacy. (2020-12-01)

Treating brain diseases now possible
POSTECH research team led by Professor Kyong-Tai Kim uncovers the mechanism that regulates local expression of key molecules in brain development and neurodegenerative diseases. (2020-12-01)

Forest fires, cars, power plants join list of risk factors for Alzheimer's disease
A new study led by researchers at UC San Francisco has found that among older Americans with cognitive impairment, the greater the air pollution in their neighborhood, the higher the likelihood of amyloid plaques - a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. The study adds to a body of evidence indicating that pollution from cars, factories, power plants and forest fires joins established dementia risk factors like smoking and diabetes. (2020-11-30)

New tests identify very early changes in Alzheimer's disease before symptoms appear
Researchers at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, together with their colleagues at the Barcelona Beta Research Centre in Spain, the University Medical Centre in Ljubljana, Slovenia, and the University of Paris, have found new forms of tau protein that become abnormal in the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease before cognitive problems develop. The scientists developed new tools to detect these subtle changes and confirmed their results in human samples. (2020-11-30)

App predicts risk of developing Alzheimer's
A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that validated biomarkers can reveal an individual's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Using a model that combines the levels of two specific proteins in the blood of those with mild memory impairment, the researchers are able to predict the risk of developing Alzheimer's. The researchers have also developed an app that doctors can use to give patients a risk assessment. (2020-11-30)

Older adults with dementia exhibit financial 'symptoms' up to six years before diagnosis
A new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Federal Reserve Board of Governors found that Medicare beneficiaries who go on to be diagnosed with dementia are more likely to miss payments on bills as early as six years before a clinical diagnosis. (2020-11-30)

Brain's 'speedometer' could help solve part of dementia puzzle
Dr Jon Brown led a team of scientists to examine how these speed-sensing nerve cells in a specific part of the brain known as the entorhinal cortex might be affected in Alzheimer's disease (2020-11-27)

Magnetic brain waves to detect injury and disease
Researchers have designed a new Optically Pumped Magnetometer (OPM) sensor for magnetoencephalography (MEG). The sensor is smaller and more robust in detecting magnetic brain signals and distinguishing them from background noise than existing sensors. Benchmarking tests showed good performance in environmental conditions where other sensors do not work, and it is able to detect brain signals against background magnetic noise, raising the possibility of MEG testing outside a specialised unit. (2020-11-23)

JAX, UMaine-lead team discover new connection between Alzheimer's dementia and Dlgap2
A national research team led by The Jackson Laboratory and the University of Maine discovered that Dlgap2, a gene that helps facilitate communication between neurons in the nervous system, is associated with the degree of memory loss in mice and risk for Alzheimer's dementia in humans. When studying post-mortem human brain tissue, the researchers also discovered low levels of Dlgap2 in people experiencing ''poorer cognitive health'' and ''faster cognitive decline'' prior to death. (2020-11-23)

The danger of Z-drugs for dementia patients
Strong sleeping pills known as 'Z-drugs' are linked with an increased risk of falls, fractures and stroke among people with dementia, according to new research. Sleep disturbance is common among people with dementia and the impact for patients and their families is significant. To date there are no proven effective treatments available, however people with dementia are often prescribed Z-drugs (zopiclone, zaleplon, and zolpidem). The new study reveals that stronger doses of these drugs are linked with an increased risk of adverse effects. (2020-11-23)

Early signs of Alzheimer's disease in people with Down's syndrome
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have studied the incidence and regional distribution of Alzheimer's disease biomarkers in the brains of people with Down's syndrome. The results can bring new possibilities for earlier diagnosis and preventive treatment of dementia. The study is published in Molecular Neurodegeneration. (2020-11-22)

Does air pollution affect mental health later in life?
In a study of women aged 80 years and older, living in locations with higher exposures to air pollution was associated with increased depressive symptoms. The findings are published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (2020-11-18)

Lesbian, gay, bisexual communities more at-risk for dementia, study finds
Analyzing the elevated cognitive health risks among older members of the LGB community, this is the first study to use a national sample and screening tool to gauge cognitive health disparities between LGB and heterosexual older adults. (2020-11-18)

Tau protein changes in Alzheimer's disease correlate with dementia stage
In new research, Judith Steen, Ph.D. and colleagues at Boston Children's Hospital show for the first time that a pathological form of the tau protein involved in the progression of Alzheimer's disease changes over time due to chemical modifications. Observed in brain tissue from Alzheimer's patients, the modified tau forms correlated with stages of dementia. These discoveries likely mean it will take multiple drugs to target the tau protein effectively. (2020-11-18)

The long road to dementia
Alzheimer's disease develops over decades. It begins with a fatal chain reaction in which masses of misfolded beta-amyloid proteins are produced that in the end literally flood the brain. Researchers from the Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases show in the journal Nature Neuroscience that this chain reaction starts much earlier in mice than commonly assumed. (2020-11-17)

Retinas: New potential clues in diagnosing, treating Alzheimer's
A study led by the Cedars-Sinai Department of Neurosurgery has identified certain regions in the retina - the lining found in the back of the eye - that are more affected by Alzheimer's disease than other areas. The findings may help physicians predict changes in the brain as well as cognitive deterioration, even for patients experiencing the earliest signs of mild impairment. (2020-11-17)

Actively speaking two languages protects against cognitive decline
According to a study led by Marco Calabria, a researcher of the Speech Production and Bilingualism research group and of the Cognitive NeuroLab at the UOC, the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment in Alzheimer patients with a higher degree of bilingualism is delayed. (2020-11-16)

Scientists reduce levels of molecules that kill neurons in elderly mice with Alzheimer's
Researchers at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona have developed an antibody fragment that reduces beta-amyloid peptide and tau protein levels, the ultimate cause of neuronal death in Alzheimer's, ameliorating the hallmarks of the disease at its most advanced stage. The research, published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences, paves the way for a new pharmacological approach to treat Alzheimer's disease. (2020-11-16)

Most Medicare beneficiaries say they don't receive cognitive assessments
In a survey of Medicare beneficiaries, approximately one-half reported having an annual wellness visit, but only about a quarter of total respondents reported receiving a structured cognitive assessment at an annual wellness visit, even though, under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), detection of cognitive impairment is a required component of the visit. (2020-11-13)

Individualized brain stimulation therapy improves language performance in stroke survivors
Individualized brain stimulation therapy improves language performance in stroke survivors. (2020-11-12)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.