Current Democracy News and Events

Current Democracy News and Events, Democracy News Articles.
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How women, migrants and workers are represented in the German Bundestag
Political scientists from the universities of Konstanz, Basel, Geneva and Stuttgart examine how members of the German Bundestag who belong to disadvantaged groups advocate for their interests (2021-02-23)

Like it or not, history shows that taxes and bureaucracy are cornerstones of democracy
A team of anthropologists assembled data on 30 pre-modern societies, and conducted a quantitative analysis of the features and durability of 'good governance'--that is, receptiveness to citizen voice, provision of goods and services, and limited concentration of wealth and power. The results showed that societies based on a broad, equitable, well-managed tax system and functioning bureaucracies were statistically more likely to have political institutions that were more open to public input and more sensitive to the well-being of the populace. (2021-02-18)

Does Goal 7 Energy for All need a rethink?
Goal 7 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aims to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all by 2030. Yet according to new research by Copenhagen Business School the poor planning and execution of decarbonisation strategies in emerging markets challenges the aims of Goal 7. (2021-02-08)

Describing the worldviews of the new 'tech elite'
The new tech elite share distinct views setting them apart from other segments of the world's elite more generally, according to a study published January 20, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Hilke Brockmann from Jacobs University Bremen, Germany, and colleagues. (2021-01-20)

Delivering the news with humor makes young adults more likely to remember and share
Could the merging of humor and news actually help inform the public? New research from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania and the School of Communication at Ohio State University found that young people were more likely to remember information about politics and government policy when it was conveyed in a humorous rather than non-humorous manner. They were also more willing to share the information online. (2021-01-07)

Most U.S. social studies teachers feel unprepared to teach civic learning
Only one in five social studies teachers in U.S. public schools report feeling very well prepared to support students' civic learning, saying they need additional aid with instructional materials, professional development and training, according to a RAND Corporation survey. (2020-12-08)

Racial microaggressions contribute to disparities in STEM education
Careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) are one of the fastest-growing areas of work in the United States, yet racial and gender disparities remain in STEM occupations. A recent study from University of Illinois researchers examining reasons for such disparities shows the overall racial climate on a college campus--informed by experiences of racial microaggressions--is a contributing factor in the lack of representation of students of color in STEM education programs. (2020-12-08)

UBC study explores link between social status and trust in decision-makers
A recent study examining perceptions of power suggests that individuals with lower socioeconomic statuses are more likely to have a negative view of policy or decision-makers. (2020-12-03)

Why does it matter if most Republican voters still think Biden lost?
As President-elect Joe Biden and his administrative team officially begin the transition process, only about 20 percent of Republican voters consider him the true winner of the election. Nearly half of all respondents--48 percent--still expect President Donald Trump to be inaugurated for a second term on January 20, despite plenty of indicators to the contrary. Those are among the findings of the latest Bright Line Watch (November) survey--conducted by political science faculty at the University of Rochester, Chicago, and Dartmouth. (2020-12-02)

Weak police, strong democracy: civic ritual and performative peace in contemporary Taiwan
Looking at a case study of Taiwanese police interacting with a powerful local union, the author explores ''weak policing.'' (2020-12-01)

A study analyses what leads US citizens to support intervention abroad
Researchers at UPF and at the Catholic University of Leuven have studied the different motivations and ways whereby the US intervenes in other countries to promote democracy, such as foreign aid, economic sanctions and military intervention. (2020-11-17)

Like fire and ice: Why societies are increasingly fragmenting
Scientists at the Complexity Science Hub Vienna show that the accelerating fragmentation of society - often referred to as filter bubbles -- is a direct consequence of the growing number of social contacts. According to their new theory of social fragmentation, societies can only be either cohesive or fragmented, with abrupt changes from one state to the other at certain tipping points. Filter bubble societies are a risk for democracies. (2020-11-17)

New study by ESMT Berlin shows political commitment increasingly important for CEOs
Political and social engagement is a relevant topic for European business leaders. CEOs are increasingly making public statements on political issues in order to make a positive contribution to socially relevant topics. These are the findings of a recent study at ESMT Berlin. (2020-11-02)

Experts see substantial danger to democratic stability around 2020 election
The latest Bright Line Watch survey finds substantial risks to the legitimacy of the election, including potential problems in the casting and counting of votes, the Electoral College, and in the resolution of electoral disputes. (2020-10-30)

How hard is it to vote in your state?
A new analysis identifies U.S. states that make it easiest, and those that make it more challenging, to register and vote. (2020-10-28)

'Foreign disinformation' social media campaigns linked to falling vaccination rates
'Foreign disinformation' social media campaigns are linked to falling vaccination rates, reveals an international time trends analysis, published in the online journal BMJ Global Health. (2020-10-22)

Voters unlikely to blame politicians for their handling of the pandemic at next election
Politicians are unlikely to be punished or rewarded for their failures or successes in managing the coronavirus pandemic at the next election, suggests an analysis of survey data from the US, the UK and India, published in the online journal BMJ Global Health. (2020-10-22)

Democracy: Millennials are the most disillusioned generation 'in living memory' - global study
Globally, millennials are most dissatisfied with democracy, and more so than previous generations were when under 35. Major Cambridge report analysed data from close to 5 million people from 160 nations across almost half a century. Researchers find millennials are most satisfied with democracy under populist leaders, the sole exception being the Trump presidency. Millennials in developed democracies are more likely to judge political opponents as 'morally flawed' than older voters. (2020-10-19)

Coordinated efforts on Twitter to interfere in US elections are foreign-based
An analysis of more than 2.2 million tweets has found a coordinated effort to influence the upcoming U.S. presidential election by sowing distrust, exacerbating political divisions and undermining confidence in American democracy. The effort is most likely foreign, according to the study. (2020-10-08)

Higher narcissism may be linked with more political participation
A politically engaged electorate is key to any thriving democracy, but not everyone participates in elections and other political activities. New Penn State research found that people who are narcissistic may also be more politically active. (2020-09-25)

International study will compare different countries' responses to COVID-19
Project led by researchers from Brazilian and American institutions will collect primary data during the pandemic to create a repository that will serve as a basis for future studies. The findings of the comparative analysis will be published in book form. (2020-09-17)

US democratic indicators plummet amid racial justice protests and pandemic
The health of democracy in the United States has reached its lowest point since an academic watchdog group of political scientists began tracking its performance in 2017. Results of the August 2020 expert survey from Bright Line Watch show a new low of 61 out of 100 on the group's scale. (2020-09-11)

Special Issue - Democracy: In Flux and Under Threat
In this special issue of Science, a series of Insights pieces examines the current state of democracy worldwide. (2020-09-03)

Paper ballots, risk-limiting audits can help defend elections and democracy, study finds
With just over two months before the 2020 election, three professors at the Indiana University Kelley School of Business offer a comprehensive review of how other nations are seeking to protect their democratic institutions and presents how a multifaceted, targeted approach is needed to achieve that goal in the U.S., where intelligence officials have warned that Russia and other rivals are again attempting to undermine our democracy. (2020-09-02)

OECD countries' politicians follow each other
The more democratic a country is, the greater the probability that its politicians decide in the same way as in neighbouring countries, without further analysis. This is according a research group that has studied political decision-making during the beginning of the Corona crisis. The results have now been published in the respected journal PNAS. (2020-08-12)

Study: Americans prize party loyalty over democratic principles
It is conventional wisdom that Americans cherish democracy -- but a new study by Yale political scientists reports that only a small fraction of U.S. voters are willing to sacrifice their partisan and policy interests to defend democratic principles. (2020-08-10)

Ethnolinguistic diversity slows down urban growth
Where various ethnic groups live together, cities grow at a slower rate. That is the conclusion reached by a researcher from the University of Basel and his colleagues based on worldwide data that shows how the diversity of language groups in 1975 has influenced urban growth 40 years later. The scientists have reported their findings in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2020-06-29)

Voter ID laws discriminate against racial and ethnic minorities, new study reveals
Voter ID laws are becoming more common and more strict, and the stakes for American democracy are high and growing higher by the year. New research from the University of California San Diego provides evidence that voter ID laws disproportionately reduce voter turnout in more racially diverse areas. (2020-06-24)

'Game changer' for reporters: 2016 US presidential election coverage
The 2016 US presidential election is considered a 'game changer' for journalists covering the US presidential elections by causing them to dramatically reconsider how they view their role -- either as neutral disseminators of information or impassioned advocates for the truth -- according to researchers at the University of Missouri's School of Journalism. (2020-06-22)

Researchers: Homes of North Zealand's elite are most likely to be preserved
Since 1945, the vast majority of historically preserved dwellings in Denmark are architect-designed gems located in North Zealand, according to a study conducted by, among others, a University of Copenhagen researcher. The researchers point out that this contradicts the legal requirement for historical preservation to reflect the population as a whole, not just the elite. (2020-06-16)

Refugee camps vulnerable to COVID-19 outbreaks
A COVID-19 outbreak in a refugee settlement will likely overwhelm the available healthcare capacity and infrastructure and spread through nearly the entire settlement population if left unchecked, according to a new study published June 16 in PLOS Medicine by Paul Spiegel of Johns Hopkins University, United States, and colleagues. (2020-06-16)

Swing voters, swing stocks, swing users
A new technique could help identify prime candidates for changing election outcomes, or lead to a better understanding of how institutional and environmental factors shape the emergence of social structure. (2020-06-02)

Do democracies behave differently from non-democracies when it comes to foreign policy?
The question of whether democracies behave differently from non-democracies is a central, and intense, debate in the field of international relations. Two intellectual traditions -- liberalism and realism -- dominate. Liberals argue that democracies do indeed behave differently, while realists insist that regime type and ideology are of little relevance in understanding foreign policy behavior. Arman Grigoryan, a faculty member in the Department of International Relations at Lehigh University has contributed to this debate with a recent article in a top journal, International Security. (2020-05-12)

Does 'participatory budgeting' lead to political patronage?
Researchers ask whether 'Participatory Budgeting' in New York City has become a vehicle for vote-getting by municipal legislators. (2020-04-30)

Perception of US democracy tanks after Trump impeachment
While President Donald Trump's impeachment gripped the country, the long-term consequences of his trial and acquittal for American democracy remain yet unclear. What's clear already, however, is that both the public's and political experts' perceptions of the health of US democracy clearly declined during this period. Those are the findings of an academic watchdog group that conducted its latest survey between March 12 and April 15, 2020. (2020-04-27)

How computational linguistics helps to understand how language works
Distributional semantics obtains representations of the meaning of words by processing thousands of texts and extracting generalizations using computational algorithms. Despite the popularity of distributional semantics in such fields as computational linguistics and cognitive science, its impact on theoretical linguistics has so far been very limited. (2020-03-03)

Journalism is an 'attack surface' for those who spread misinformation
For all the benefits in the expansion of the media landscape, we're still struggling with the spread of misinformation -- and the damage is especially worrisome when it comes to information about science and health. Dan Gillmor, co-founder of the News Co/Lab at Arizona State University's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, will discuss his work on improving media literacy during a panel presentation on Feb. 15 as part of the AAAS annual meeting in Seattle, Washington. (2020-02-15)

Secularism and tolerance of minority groups predicts future prosperity of countries
Secular cultures which are tolerant of minority groups and respectful of individuals' rights tend to have more wealth, education and democracy, a new study by University of Bristol scientists has found. New research, which surveyed nearly half a million people across 109 countries, shows that changes in culture generally comes before any improvements in wealth, education and?democracy, rather than the other way around. (2020-02-11)

A new learning model to enhance citizen participation
How to teach citizens to become active members of the society? Peter Ehrström, Head of Research in Regional Science, and Marina Lindell, Project Researcher at the Social Science Research Institute of Åbo Akademi University in Vaasa, Finland, approached the question by inviting a group of students on a course that utilized a method called Deliberative Walks. The experiment produced very positive results. (2020-02-06)

Global dissatisfaction with democracy at record high, new report reveals
2019 had the 'highest level of democratic discontent' since detailed global recording began in 1995. Many large democracies now at their highest-ever recorded level for democratic dissatisfaction, including the UK, US, Brazil, Mexico and Australia. (2020-01-28)

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