Current Dendritic Cells News and Events

Current Dendritic Cells News and Events, Dendritic Cells News Articles.
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Immune system protects children from severe COVID-19
Children are protected from severe COVID-19 because their innate immune system is quick to attack the virus, a new study has found. (2021-02-17)

TB study reveals potential targets to treat and control infection
Researchers at the Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC) at Texas Biomedical Research Institute (Texas Biomed) may have found a new pathway to treat and control tuberculosis (TB), the disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Using single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNAseq), a next-generation sequencing technology, scientists were able to further define the mechanisms that lead to TB infection and latency. (2021-02-16)

STING activation reduces graft-versus-host disease in a mouse model
MUSC Hollings Cancer Center researcher Yongxia Wu, Ph.D., identified a new target molecule in the fight against graft-versus-host disease. (2021-02-11)

Smectite promotes probiotic biofilm formation in gut for cancer immunotherapy
Orally administrating probiotics is ineffective due to the poor inhabitation of exogenous bacteria in host intestines. Chinese scientists report that smectite, a type of mineral clay and classical anti-diarrhoea drug, can promote the expansion of probiotics in the murine gut that subsequently elicits anti-tumor immune responses. Their findings suggest a novel approach to specifically enrich probiotics in the body, with high translational potential for cancer immunotherapy. (2021-02-10)

New "molecular" tool helps shed light on individual synapses in brain cells
Optogenetics, or genetically engineering neurons to respond to light, is an important technique for studying how neurons work. However, manipulating individual synapses (gaps between neurons), where signaling transmission occurs, has been challenging until now. Researchers at National Institute of Physiological Sciences, Japan, have now generated a light-activated signaling protein that can help study signaling-related physiological changes in single neurons--a breakthrough that will be valuable for neuroscience. (2021-02-09)

New biomarker may predict which pancreatic cancer patients respond to CD40 immunotherapy
Inflammation in the blood could serve as a new biomarker to help identify patients with advanced pancreatic cancer who won't respond to the immune-stimulating drugs known as CD40 agonists, suggests a new study from researchers in the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania published in JCI Insight. (2021-02-04)

Spanish scientists identify a mechanism through which dendritic cells improve their antiviral and immunotherapy strategies
Researchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) have discovered that dendritic cells, which initiate specific immune responses, can reprogram their genes to improve their immune response (2021-02-03)

How a little-known glycoprotein blocks a cancer cell's immune response
Researchers uncovered how stanniocalcin-1, or STC1, works inside a tumor cell to block a cellular ''eat-me'' signal that typically triggers the immune system to produce T cells to fight the tumor. The findings provide a potential target to improve immune responses to cancer. (2021-01-28)

Ludwig Cancer Research study reveals how certain gut bacteria compromise radiotherapy
A study led by Ludwig Chicago Co-director Ralph Weichselbaum and Yang-Xin Fu of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center has shown how bacteria in the gut can dull the efficacy of radiotherapy, a treatment received by about half of all cancer patients. (2021-01-26)

Immunology - Functionality of immune cells in early life
A study by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers shows that putatively immature dendritic cells found in young children are able to induce robust immune responses. The results could lead to improved vaccination protocols. (2021-01-21)

Tissue stiffness likely drives immune responses in many chronic diseases
Stiffness in our tissues causes tension in our cells. Research shows that stiffness impacts the innate immune system by upping its metabolism. Buck Institute findings suggest the cellular tension likely sets off an inflammatory loop that contributes to the development of chronic diseases of aging. Researchers present an emerging way of looking at how the immune system functions, possibilities for new immunotherapeutics, and a call for scientists to reconsider the way they do experiments. (2021-01-12)

Treating an autoimmune disease in mice with an mRNA vaccine
Christina Krienke and colleagues have designed an mRNA vaccine that delayed the onset of and reduced the severity of multiple sclerosis-like disease in mice. (2021-01-07)

Tracking the formation of the early heart, cell by cell
Richard Tyser and colleagues have mapped the origins of the embryonic mouse heart at single-cell resolution, helping to define the cell types that make up the heart in the earliest days of development. (2021-01-07)

Gut cells sound the alarm when parasites invade
When the parasite Cryptosporidium enters the body, it's cells in the intestines that first recognize the invader, triggering an early immune response, according to a new study led by a team from the University of Pennsylvania. A leading cause of diarrheal disease in young children globally, the parasite generates an inflammatory response beginning in the intestines that exacerbates the effects of malnutrition. (2020-12-28)

Brain stem cells divide over months
For the first time, scientists at the University of Zurich have been able to observe the way stem cells in the adult brains of mice divide over the course of months to create new nerve cells. Their study shows that brain stem cells are active over a long period, and thus provides new insights that will feed into stem cell research. (2020-12-21)

Diseased cell fragments burst from pockets in immune cells to activate response
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have uncovered an important process in how our immune system detects signs of disease and activates a protective response. This understanding could improve efforts to find new and effective immunotherapy treatments for diseases like cancer. (2020-12-21)

A protein has been identified as a potential therapeutic target for leishmaniasis vaccines
According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), leishmaniasis causes between 20,000 and 30,000 deaths a year, and there is currently no vaccine for humans. A research team led by the Complutense University of Madrid has described the mechanism by which the Leishmania parasite avoids detection: through the SHP-1 protein, which is responsible for basic cellular functions. The finding positions this protein as a potential therapeutic target for the development of vaccines against the disease. (2020-12-11)

Potential cancer therapy may boost immune response
A new approach to cancer therapy shows potential to transform the commonly used chemotherapy drug gemcitabine into a drug that kills cancer cells in a specialized way, activating immune cells to fight the cancer, according to a study led by Cedars-Sinai Cancer investigators. (2020-12-07)

What makes psoriasis sore: Novel role of immune system in the disease
More than 130 million people around the globe suffer from psoriasis vulgaris, a chronic condition characterized by skin inflammation, scales, and dry patches. However, its pathology is not fully clear. In a recent study, dermatology researchers from Japan have uncovered a complex cellular mechanism responsible for the onset of psoriasis and highlighted potential therapeutic targets for future treatment. (2020-12-03)

Early trial hints CAR T cells may combat solid tumors in children with neuroblastoma
A phase 1 trial involving 12 children with relapsed neuroblastoma - a hard-to-treat pediatric cancer - shows that anticancer CAR T cells displayed signs of efficacy against these tumors while avoiding damage to nerve tissue. (2020-11-25)

JAX, UMaine-lead team discover new connection between Alzheimer's dementia and Dlgap2
A national research team led by The Jackson Laboratory and the University of Maine discovered that Dlgap2, a gene that helps facilitate communication between neurons in the nervous system, is associated with the degree of memory loss in mice and risk for Alzheimer's dementia in humans. When studying post-mortem human brain tissue, the researchers also discovered low levels of Dlgap2 in people experiencing ''poorer cognitive health'' and ''faster cognitive decline'' prior to death. (2020-11-23)

Research shows the intrinsically nonlinear nature of receptive fields in vision
According to a study led by Marcelo Bertalmío, a researcher at the Department of Information and Communication Technologies, published in the journal of the group Nature, Scientific Reports, which proposes a paradigm shift for both vision science and for artificial intelligence. (2020-11-23)

Proteins in motion
Membrane proteins are more efficient at reaching distal dendrites than soluble proteins (2020-11-21)

Stem cell transplantation: undesirable rejection mechanism identified
In the treatment of leukaemia, stem cell transplantation subsequent to chemotherapy and radiation can often engender severe adverse inflammatory reactions - especially in the skin or in the gut, since these so-called barrier organs are more frequently affected. Up until now, the reason for this was unclear. A team of researchers in Vienna has now identified an immune mechanism that is partially responsible for this. (2020-11-19)

Coinfection: more than the sum of its parts
Infections with two pathogens pose a serious threat in the clinics. Researchers from Würzburg and Jena have developed a technique that provides new insights into this process and can be used as an early warning system. (2020-11-18)

Researchers discover how to boost vaccine designed to prevent melanoma recurrence
A vaccine created to prevent the recurrence of the deadly skin cancer melanoma is about twice as effective when patients also receive two components that boost the number and effectiveness of immune system cells called dendritic cells, according to phase 2 clinical trial results published in Nature Cancer in November. (2020-11-16)

Parasitic worms offer 'the missing link' on the dual nature of a key immune regulator
By studying two models of parasite infection, the University of Pennsylvania's De'Broski Herbert and colleagues filled in crucial gaps about the activity of the signaling molecule IL-33 that is critical to asthma, allergies, and other diseases. (2020-11-13)

A viable vaccine for tough tumors
While immunotherapies work well for some cancers, others are immune-resistant and condemn patients to the severe side effects of long-term chemo treatment. A new cancer vaccine successfully treated immune-resistant breast cancer in mice, 100% of which survived a second injection of cancer cells, indicating long-term immunity with no side effects. (2020-11-10)

How allergens trigger itching: Finding points to new targets for allergy drug development
A key step in the immune system's response to allergens has been uncovered by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital. They have shown that a neuropeptide called Substance P is released by certain neurons in the skin when they detect allergens, and that this substance is essential in the development of allergen-induced immune responses. This research could lead to the development of new and better methods to treat and prevent allergies. (2020-10-29)

Motivation to seek cocaine is driven by elegant cellular communication
In response to cocaine, the connections between neurons, or brain cells, strengthen due to signaling that starts outside those cells, report researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina and the National Institutes of Health in the Journal of Neuroscience. The strengthening of neuronal connections makes it more difficult to stop seeking drugs. These results provide potentially targetable molecules for treatment of addiction to prevent relapse. (2020-10-28)

Rapid method of isolating tumor-targeting T cells could propel personalized cancer treatment
When it comes to defeating cancer, some immune cells are mightier than others. But even the best-trained eye and today's advanced scientific tools have trouble discerning the most powerful tumor-fighting cells from the rest. A new technique developed by Scripps Research scientist Peng Wu, PhD, aims to change that--offering a new platform that could propel personalized cancer treatments that have been hindered due to the challenges of isolating the most useful immune cells in patients. (2020-10-22)

Vaccine to treat and prevent lung, bowel and pancreatic cancer shows promise in the lab
An experimental vaccine, designed to enlist the body's own immune system to target cancer cells, has shown promise for treating and preventing cancer in mice. The vaccine was created to target a gene called KRAS that is involved in the development of many types of cancer, including lung, bowel and pancreatic cancer. (2020-10-22)

New anti-AB vaccine could help halt Alzheimer's progression, preclinical study finds
A preclinical study led by University of South Florida Health neuroscientists indicates that an antigen-presenting dendritic vaccine with a specific antibody response to oligomeric Aβ may be safer and offer clinical benefit in treating Alzheimer's disease. The vaccine uses immune cells known as dendritic cells loaded with a modified Aβ peptide as the antigen. (2020-10-20)

Reelin-Nrp1 interaction regulates neocortical dendrite development
Reelin exhibits a context-dependent function during brain development; however, its underlying mechanism is not well understood. Here, we found that neuropilin-1 specifically binds to the C-terminal region of Reelin and acts as a co-receptor for canonical Reelin-receptor. The Reelin-Nrp1 interaction is essential for proper dendritic development in superficial-layer neurons. This study provides evidence of the context-specific function of Reelin regulated by the C-terminal residues. (2020-10-15)

A new approach to analyzing the morphology of dendritic spines
Dendritic spines are small protrusions from a neuron's dendrite membrane, where contact with neighboring axons is formed to receive synaptic input. Changes in the characteristics of the dendritic spines are associated with learning and memory and could be a feature of neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Scientists examined a novel approach to analyzing the dendritic spine shapes. (2020-10-12)

HKUMed develops a novel therapeutic approach against Epstein-Barr virus-associated tumours
A research team at LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong (HKUMed) discovered that exosomes derived from Vδ2-T cells (Vδ2-T-Exos) can effectively control Epstein-Barr virus-associated tumours and induce T-cell anti-tumour immunity. The novel findings of Vδ2-T-Exos provide insights into new therapeutic approach for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated tumours. The ground-breaking findings have been published in the leading academic journal, Science Translational Medicine. (2020-10-09)

New biomarker to prevent graft-versus-host disease in stem cell transplants discovered
With more than $1.5 million in funding from the National Cancer Institute, MUSC Hollings Cancer Center researchers discovered a new biomarker, plasmacytoid dendritic cells expressing the ICOS ligand, whose activity can be blocked by the dual-acting drug candidate ALPN-101 to prevent graft-versus-host disease following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. (2020-10-07)

Deep-brain imaging at synaptic resolution with adaptive optics 2-photon endomicroscopy
Recognizing the need for improved imaging capabilities, a group of scientists from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) focused their sights on achieving brain imaging at synaptic resolution. (2020-10-06)

Latent lineage potential in neural stem cells enables spinal cord repair in mice
Spinal stem cells in mice can be reprogrammed to generate protective oligodendrocytes after spinal cord injury, enhancing neural repair, according to a new study. (2020-10-01)

Unconventional T cell subset enriched in airways of some patients with severe COVID-19
Unconventional T cells called mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are recruited to the airways and strongly activated in some patients with severe COVID-19, a new study has found, suggesting the cells' possible involvement in the development of disease. (2020-09-28)

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