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Current Dendritic Cells News and Events, Dendritic Cells News Articles.
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Berry good news -- new compound from blueberries could treat inflammatory disorders
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), caused by chronic inflammation in the digestive tract linings, can be debilitating and life threatening. Therapeutic options include suppression of immune response, but treatments leading to complete cure of IBD are still not available. Recently, a team of researchers of Tokyo University of Science has discovered a polyphenolic compound derived from blueberry that shows remarkable immunosuppressive effects and can be useful in treating IBD. (2020-09-23)

Increasing the effectiveness of immunotherapy against skin cancer
Researchers at the University of Bern have discovered a mechanism in the body's own immune system which is responsible for the maturation and activation of immune cells. In the fight against skin cancer, the results have the potential to help immunotherapies succeed, even in patients for whom they have so far been ineffective. (2020-09-18)

Super-potent blood stem cells discovered in human embryos
In research recently published in Stem Cell Reports, Andrejs Ivanovs, Alexander Medvinsky (a.medvinsky@ed.ac.uk) and colleagues from the University of Edinburgh discovered that HSCs from early human embryos, when HSCs are just starting to form, are more robust at expanding than those from the cord blood. (2020-09-17)

A 'cell-less' therapy may regenerate heart tissue without cell transplant risks
Ling Gao and colleagues have developed a strategy that uses exosomes - tiny membrane-bound sacs secreted by cells - to mimic the heart-regenerating effects of cardiac cell transplants, while potentially avoiding risks associated with whole-cell transplants. (2020-09-16)

Repulsion mechanism between neurons governs fly brain structure
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Nature Communications the discovery that in the developing fly brain, neurons stemming from the same parent cell experience repulsion. This lineage-dependent repulsion is regulated by a protein known as Dscam1. (2020-09-04)

Ultraviolet B exposure expands proenkephalin+ regulatory T cells with a healing function
Skin exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) induces expansion of regulatory T (Treg) cells with immunosuppressive activity. Here researchers found that UVB-expanded skin Treg (UVB-skin Treg) cells had a tissue repair function. UVB-skin Treg cells expressed proenkephalin (PENK) and amphiregulin (AREG), which promoted keratinocyte outgrowth and skin wound healing. Their results provide a new implication in developing a therapy using UVB-skin Treg cells. (2020-09-01)

How cells solve mazes and traverse great distances through the body
Cells are particularly good at solving mazes, according to a new study, which demonstrates how they are able to navigate long and complicated routes through the body using self-generated chemoattractant gradients. (2020-08-27)

Unlocking the mysteries of the brain
A research team highlights the mechanisms underlying memory and learning capacity -- specifically, how our brains process, store and integrate information. (2020-08-26)

Thin layer protects battery, allows cold charging
In the search for a reliable, quick-charging, cold-weather battery for automobiles, a self-assembling, thin layer of electrochemically active molecules may be the solution, according to a team or researchers. (2020-08-25)

Acidic niche keeps lymphatic system in check during immune response
In a new article published in Nature Communications, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers describe a novel acidic niche within lymph nodes that plays an integral role in regulating T cell activation. (2020-08-18)

Intranasal vaccine platform has potential for more effective vaccines, fewer side effects
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is shining a spotlight on vaccine development. As numerous vaccines race through clinical trials, physicians and researchers continue to develop new vaccine technologies to generate the most effective vaccines with the fewest side effects. A new proof-of-concept study by researchers at the University of Chicago and Duke University demonstrates the potential for one such platform, using self-assembling peptide nanofibers tagged with antigens to prime the immune system against a potential invasion. (2020-08-07)

A safer cell therapy harnesses patient T cells to fight multiple myeloma
A treatment for multiple myeloma that harnesses the body's cancer-fighting T cells was safe in humans and showed preliminary signs of effectiveness, according to a clinical trial involving 23 patients with relapsed or treatment-resistant disease. (2020-07-29)

Immunoprotein impairs Sars-Cov-2
A protein produced by the human immune system can strongly inhibit corona viruses, including Sars-Cov-2, the pathogen causing Covid-19. An international team from Germany, Switzerland and the USA successfully showed that the LY6E-Protein prevents coronaviruses from causing an infection. (2020-07-28)

SARS-CoV-2 infection of non-neuronal cells, not neurons, may drive loss of smell in patients with COVID-19
A new study of human olfactory cells has revealed that viral invasion of supportive cells in the nasal cavity might be driving the loss of smell seen in some patients with COVID-19. The findings show that non- (2020-07-24)

How the regulator is regulated -- Insight into immune-related protein holds therapeutic value
Various proteins expressed in cells of the immune system have shown to play an important role in various disorders, including cancer, allergy, and autoimmune disease. In a new study, scientists find out how an immune checkpoint protein called PD-L2, which is expressed on the surface of a type of immune cells, is regulated at the molecular level. The findings of this study have the potential to usher in new developments in the field of immune therapy. (2020-07-21)

Li-ions transport across electrolytes and SEI like beads passing through a Galton Board
Covalent organic framework (COF) film coating on a commercial polypropylene separator is applied as an ion redistributor to eliminate Li dendrites, leading to a high Li-ion transference number of 0.77±0.01. The transport of Li-ions across the COF film can be considered to be analogous to beads passing through a Galton Board. (2020-07-20)

Type 1 interferon deficiency: Biomarker of patients at risk of severe COVID
Which patients are more likely to develop a severe form of Covid-19? This is a key question that needs to be answered to improve the individual management and prognosis of patients. In a study published in Science on July 13, teams from AP-HP, Inserm, Université of Paris, Institut Pasteur and Institut Imagine describe a unique and unexpected immunological phenotype in severe and critical patients. (2020-07-17)

How breast cancer cells sneak past local immune defenses
Breast cancer cells grow locally, then metastasize throughout the body. They succeed in establishing tumors by sabotaging local immune cells embedded in tissues, thus evading detection and destruction by the body's roving immune defenses. (2020-07-15)

In mouse study, black raspberries show promise for reducing skin inflammation
In a study done with mice and published earlier this month in the journal Nutrients, researchers found that a diet high in black raspberries reduced inflammation from contact hypersensitivity -- a condition that causes redness and inflammation in the skin. (2020-07-02)

SARS-CoV-2-attacking T cells found in 10 COVID-19 patients and 2 uninfected controls
Patients suffering from severe respiratory symptoms as a result of SARS-CoV-2 infection can rapidly generate virus-attacking T cells, and can increase this production over time, suggests a new study of T cells from 10 COVID-19 patients under intensive care treatment. (2020-06-26)

Genetic malfunction of brain astrocytes triggers migraine
Neuroscientists of the University of Zurich shed a new light on the mechanisms responsible for familial migraine: They show that a genetic dysfunction in specific brain cells of the cingulate cortex area strongly influences head pain occurrence. (2020-06-24)

Oncotarget: Indoximod opposes the immunosuppressive effects mediated by IDO and TDO
Volume 11 Issue 25 of Oncotarget reported that Indoximod has shaped the understanding of the biology of IDO1 in the control of immune responses, though its mechanism of action has been poorly understood. (2020-06-23)

An excessive amount of propionic acid (PPA) in food preservatives may hinder brain development
This research proves the mechanism of autism induced by an imbalance of human gut microorganisms. (2020-06-17)

Prodigiosin-based solution has selective activity against cancer cells
Together with colleagues from the University of Palermo, KFU employees offer a nano preparation based on biocompatible halloysite nanotubes and bacterial pigment prodigiosin; the latter is known to selectively disrupt cancer cells without damaging the healthy ones. (2020-06-12)

How targeting killer T cells in the lungs could lead to immunity against respiratory viruses
A significant site of damage during COVID-19 infection is the lungs. Understanding how the lungs' immune cells are responding to viral infections could help scientists develop a vaccine. Now, a team of researchers led by Salk Professor Susan Kaech has discovered that the cells responsible for long-term immunity in the lungs can be activated more easily than previously thought. The insight could aid in the development of universal vaccines for influenza and the novel coronavirus. (2020-06-11)

Chronic exposure to interferons being tested for COVID-19 therapy may increase the risk of bacterial
Two separate studies in mice suggest that a class of interferons being evaluated in clinical trials as a therapy for COVID-19 may increase susceptibility to bacterial infections, depending on how long patients are exposed to it, and when they receive it. (2020-06-11)

A novel mechanism that triggers a cellular immune response
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine present comprehensive evidence that supports a novel trigger for a cell-mediated response and propose a mechanism for its action. (2020-06-11)

Fewer complications after organ transplantation
A large international study coordinated by University Hospital Regensburg and Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin has demonstrated the safety of new cell therapy approaches for use in kidney transplant recipients. Transplant recipients were shown to require lower levels of immunosuppression in order to prevent organ rejection. This reduces the risk of side effects such as viral infections. Results from this study have been published in The Lancet.* (2020-06-10)

How rod-shaped particles might distract an out-of-control COVID immune response
A long-ignored white blood cell may be central to the immune system overreaction that is the most common cause of death for COVID-19 patients--and University of Michigan researchers found that rod-shaped particles can take them out of circulation. (2020-06-10)

Protecting the neuronal architecture
Protecting nerve cells from losing their characteristic extensions, the dendrites, can reduce brain damage after a stroke. Neurobiologists from Heidelberg University have demonstrated this by means of research on a mouse model. The team, led by Prof. Dr. Hilmar Bading in cooperation with Junior Professor Dr. Daniela Mauceri, is investigating the protection of neuronal architecture to develop new approaches to treating neurodegenerative diseases. (2020-06-05)

Human lifelong immunity depends on APRIL
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) identified the protein APRIL as a key regulator of plasmacyte maintenance and immunoglobulin production in humans. They showed in a patient with common variable immunodeficiency and a mutation in the gene encoding APRIL that a lack of APRIL reduces levels of plasmacytes and immunoglobulins. These findings help us understand how APRIL regulates the immune system and suggest the novel treatment by recombinant APRIL for immunodeficient conditions. (2020-06-01)

PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors treatment in lung cancer: Brightness and challenge
Immune-checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) have made a significant impact on the outcomes of lung cancer patients. However, which patient may benefit most and how to identify patients at risk of primary or acquired resistance is not completely defined. This review will give a deep insight into PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors for lung cancer, including the current settings for varied disease status, the predictive biomarkers, the resistance to ICIs, and the ongoing clinical trials in Chinese patients. (2020-05-18)

Direct control of dendritic cells for tracking and immune modulation
Dendritic cells patrol the body for invaders and activate T cells and natural killer cells to attack them, making them crucial players in keeping cancer and other diseases at bay. A new biomaterial-based technique now allows dendritic cells to be tagged, tracked, and controlled within the body for the first time. When deployed in mice, this system both treated and prevented lung cancer tumors, and shows promise for other immune conditions as well. (2020-05-18)

Releasing molecular 'brake' kick-starts immune cell function
The immune system's ability to marshal specialized cells to fight off infection relies in part on tiny molecules called microRNAs, which act as a release for the 'brakes' that keep cells dormant until needed, according to a new study published in the journal Cell Reports. (2020-05-18)

Cancer cells deactivate their 'Velcro' to go on the attack
To form metastases, cancer cells must be able to migrate. But cancer cells are connected to each other by 'Velcro'. University of Louvain (UCLouvain) researchers have discovered that certain cancer cells manage to suppress this 'Velcro' effect so that they can migrate more easily. It's a mechanism called endocytosis. The next step? Understanding the role of this mechanism (endocytosis) in the formation of metastases, which could ultimately help fight them! (2020-05-13)

Yale researchers discover how HIV hides from treatment
Even after successful antiretroviral therapy, HIV can hide dormant in a tiny number of immune system cells for decades and re-emerge to threaten the life of its host. Now Yale University researchers have discovered a molecular explanation for how the virus accomplishes this insidious trick, they report May 13 in the journal Science Translational Medicine. (2020-05-13)

Blood cells could serve as a 'thermometer' to detect breast cancer
This study shows that patients develop alterations in a type of leukocyte at the initial stage of the disease. This discovery paves the way for the enhanced diagnosis and treatment of this type of tumor. (2020-05-12)

The microbiome controls immune system fitness
Working alongside colleagues in Mainz, Bern, Hannover and Bonn, researchers from Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH) and the German Rheumatism Research Center Berlin (DRFZ) were able to show how the microbiome helps to render the immune system capable of responding to pathogens. If absent, relevant mediators are not released, resulting in a failure to activate metabolic processes in certain immune cells, according to the researchers' report, published in Cell*. (2020-05-11)

Newly discovered cell type plays crucial role in immune response to respiratory infections
With a discovery that could rewrite the immunology textbooks, an international group of scientists, including the teams of Bart Lambrecht, Martin Guilliams, Hamida Hammad, and Charlotte Scott (all from the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research) identified a new type of antigen-presenting immune cell. (2020-05-08)

A study finds neuropeptide somatostatin enhances visual processing?
Researchers have confirmed that neuropeptide somatostatin can improve cognitive function in the brain. A research group of Professor Seung-Hee Lee from the Department of Biological Sciences at KAIST found that the application of neuropeptide somatostatin improves visual processing and cognitive behaviors by reducing excitatory inputs to parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the cortex. (2020-04-23)

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