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Current Dengue Virus News and Events, Dengue Virus News Articles.
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Autoimmunity may explain why an important immune system is absent in many bacteria
New findings from University of Exeter researchers reveal how bacterial immune systems can be harmful for their hosts and explain why they are not found in many bacteria. (2020-01-22)

Researchers trace Coronavirus outbreak in China to snakes
Emerging viral infections -- from bird flu to Ebola to Zika infections -- pose major threats to global public health, and understanding their origins can help investigators design defensive strategies against future outbreaks. A new study published in the Journal of Medical Virology provides important insights on the potential origins of the most recent outbreak of viral pneumonia in China, which started in the middle of December and now is spreading to Hong Kong, Singapore, Thailand, and Japan. (2020-01-22)

Mosquito-borne diseases could be prevented by skin cream
A skin cream used to treat warts and skin cancer could help protect people against viral diseases such as Zika and dengue, according to new research from the University of Leeds. (2020-01-22)

Here, there and everywhere: Large and giant viruses abound globally
In Nature, a team led by researchers at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a DOE Office of Science User Facility located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) uncovered a broad diversity of large and giant viruses that belong to the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV) supergroup. As a result, virus diversity in this group expanded 10-fold from just 205 genomes, redefining the phylogenetic tree of giant viruses. (2020-01-22)

Adult exposure to chickenpox linked to lower risk of shingles, but does not provide full protection
Adults who are exposed to a child with chickenpox (varicella) in the home are around 30% less likely to develop shingles (herpes zoster) over 20 years, finds a study in The BMJ today. (2020-01-22)

Dying people give last gift to help cure HIV
New year, new promise? Despite decades of research, scientists do not fully know all the places HIV hides in the human body. A new study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation enrolled people with HIV who also happened to have a terminal illness to study where HIV hides in the human body so doctors can better treat and maybe even cure HIV. (2020-01-21)

Antiviral compound offers hope against deadly flu
A study in mice finds that a compound modeled on a protein found in bananas safely protects against multiple strains of the influenza virus, Ebola and coronaviruses. (2020-01-21)

New image analysis method for time-lapse microscopy shows how giant viruses infect amoeba
Host cells infected with giant viruses behave in a unique manner. To gain deeper insight into the infection mechanism of giant viruses, scientists at Tokyo University of Science developed a specialized algorithm that can track the movement of host cells. This method could also be used to study any other type of cells, such as cancer cells, neurons, and immune cells, serving as an efficient tool in the field of cell biology. (2020-01-21)

Zika inhibits the proliferation of prostate cancer cells
Experiments performed by Brazilian scientists showed that Zika virus inhibits tumor cell proliferation even when inactivated by high temperature. The study was supported by FAPESP and published in Scientific Reports. (2020-01-20)

Nanopore sequencing of African swine fever virus
Researchers from China for the first time utilized the nanopore sequencing technology to obtain the whole genome from a clinical sample of African swine fever virus. After that they evaluated the quality and feasibility of different approaches for African swine fever virus full genome sequencing. (2020-01-16)

Zika virus' key into brain cells ID'd, leveraged to block infection and kill cancer cells
Two different UC San Diego research teams identified the same molecule -- αvβ5 integrin -- as Zika virus' key to brain cell entry. They found ways to take advantage of the integrin to both block Zika virus from infecting cells and turn it into something good: a way to shrink brain cancer stem cells. (2020-01-16)

Mosquitoes engineered to repel dengue virus
An international team of scientists has synthetically engineered mosquitoes that halt the transmission of the dengue virus. Led by biologists at UC San Diego, the researchers developed a human antibody for dengue suppression in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the insects that spread dengue. The development marks the first engineered approach in mosquitoes that targets the four known types of dengue, improving upon previous designs that addressed single strains. (2020-01-16)

Engineered mosquitoes cannot be infected with or transmit any dengue virus
Genetically engineered mosquitoes are resistant to multiple types of dengue virus (DENV), according to a study published Jan. 16 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Prasad Paradkar of the Australian Animal Health Laboratory, and Omar Akbari of the University of California, San Diego, and colleagues. As noted by the authors, this is the first engineered approach that targets all types of DENV, which is crucial for effective disease suppression. (2020-01-16)

Breakthrough on curbing dengue
Scientists from Australia's national science agency, CSIRO, and the University of California San Diego have engineered the first breed of genetically modified mosquitoes resistant to spreading all four types of the dengue virus. (2020-01-16)

Study: Pig virus is easily transmitted among chickens and turkeys
The first animal study of a pig virus' potential to jump to another species shows that the virus, once introduced to a select group of birds, is easily transmitted to healthy chickens and turkeys. (2020-01-15)

Herpes simplex viruses: new relationships between epidemiology and history
An Italian research team has refined the history and origins of two extremely common pathogens in human populations, herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2. Using and applying rather precise data methods they estimated that the circulating strains of herpes simplex virus type 1 migrated from Africa about 5000 years ago. The exit from Africa of herpes simplex virus type 2 was even more recent and probably occurred in the eighteenth century, during the height of the slave trade. (2020-01-13)

First robust cell culture model for the hepatitis E virus
A mutation switches the turbo on during virus replication. This is a blessing for research. (2020-01-13)

Smoking HIV out of dormancy
A new mechanism uncovered by a Norwegian research group could improve the chances of developing a cure for HIV by forcing the virus out of dormancy so that it can be killed. (2020-01-09)

AAFP releases updated feline retrovirus guidelines to the veterinary community
On Thursday, January 9, the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) will release updated Feline Retrovirus Testing and Management Guidelines to the veterinary community, which will be published in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery. (2020-01-09)

Hundreds of novel viruses discovered in insects
New viruses which cause diseases often come from animals. Well-known examples of this are the Zika virus transmitted by mosquitoes, bird flu viruses, as well as the MERS virus which is associated with camels. In order to identify new viral diseases quickly and prevent possible epidemics, DZIF scientists at Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin are targeting their search at viruses in animals. In a current study, they have now discovered hundreds of novel viruses in insects. (2020-01-08)

Egg-based flu vaccines: Not all they're cracked up to be?
Flu season is underway in the Northern Hemisphere, sickening millions of people and in rare cases, causing hospitalization or death. The best prevention is a flu shot, but it's not unusual for these vaccines to be less effective than intended. Some researchers suspect that the common practice of producing vaccines in chicken eggs could be partially to blame, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (2020-01-08)

Virus surfaces help MTU engineers study vaccine and gene therapy applications
An isoelectric point is a common way to characterize viruses. However, it's not easy. To improve manufacturing for vaccines and gene therapy, a Michigan Tech team uses surface charge to determine the isoelectric point of different viruses. Specifically, they use a single-particle method with atomic force microscopy (AFM). (2020-01-08)

New MPMI focus issue seeks to improve management of virus-induced disease in crops
The January focus issue of the Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions journal includes four reviews and several research articles covering a variety of current topics examining the cell biology of virus-plant and virus-vector interactions, including cellular RNA hubs, plasmodesmal functioning, tripartite interactions, mechanisms of host defense suppression, and biotechnological approaches to induce host resistance. (2020-01-08)

FSU study aids fight against HIV, hepatitis B
A discovery by Florida State University College of Medicine researchers is expected to open the door for new and more potent treatment options for many of the more than 36 million people worldwide infected with the HIV virus and for others chronically ill with hepatitis B. (2020-01-08)

New Phytopathology journal focus issue emphasizes virological advances
Given the importance of and rapid research progress in plant virology in recent years, Phytopathology emphasized virological advances in its Fundamental Aspects of Plant Viruses focus issue, which is available now. (2020-01-08)

Single dose of antibodies can knock out HIV in newborns
A single dose of an antibody-based treatment can prevent HIV transmission from mother to baby, new nonhuman primate research suggests for the first time. The findings are being published in the journal Nature Communications. This is the first time a single dose of broadly neutralizing antibodies given after viral exposure has been found to prevent infection in nonhuman primate newborns. (2020-01-07)

Researchers develop universal flu vaccine that protects against 6 influenza viruses in mice
A novel nanoparticle vaccine that combines two major influenza proteins is effective in providing broad, long-lasting protection against influenza virus in mice, showing promise as a universal flu vaccine, according to a study by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. (2020-01-07)

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Scientists identify and characterise eight more deaths from Borna disease virus and suggest more cases could be identified
Eight newly-identified fatal cases of Borna disease virus 1 (BoDV-1) suggest that where the virus occurs in the wild, it could be behind a high proportion of severe and deadly cases of encephalitis, according to results from 56 patients who had developed signs of encephalitis over the past 20 years, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal. (2020-01-07)

HIV patients lose smallpox immunity despite childhood vaccine, AIDS drugs
HIV patients lose immunity to smallpox even though they were vaccinated against the disease as children and have had much of their immune system restored with antiretroviral therapy, according to a study published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases. Called HIV-associated immune amnesia, the finding could explain why people living with HIV still tend to have shorter lives on average than their HIV-negative counterparts despite being on antiretroviral therapy. (2020-01-02)

Targeting cholesterol metabolism in macrophages to eliminate viral infection
A new study published in Immunity now provides important new information. WANG Hongyan's team from the Center for Excellence in Molecular and Cellular Science, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), in collaboration with Prof. WEI Bin at Shanghai University (the former PI of the Wuhan Institute of Virology of CAS), screened expression levels of multiple enzymes that regulate cholesterol metabolism to better understand how cholesterol metabolites combats infection. (2019-12-27)

Cellular culprit suspected of pushing dengue fever from bad to worse is cleared by transcripts
No one knows what makes a mild dengue viral infection morph into a severe and sometimes deadly dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. Experts previously believed the likely cause was ramped up activity of T cells, which can massively boost an immune response to a virus. Now, researchers at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI), have found definitive evidence that CD4 T cells, one of two main subtypes of T cells, are not to blame. (2019-12-24)

Researchers discover how Zika virus remodels its host cell to boost viral production
Researchers in China have discovered how a Zika virus protein reshapes its host cell to aid viral replication. The study, which will be published Dec. 23 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that the viral protein NS1 converts an interior cellular compartment called the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) into a protective region where the virus can survive and replicate. Blocking this process could be a novel therapeutic strategy to treat patients infected with Zika or similar viral pathogens. (2019-12-23)

A fast and inexpensive device to capture and identify viruses
A device to quickly capture and identify various strains of virus has been developed, according to researchers at Penn State and New York University. (2019-12-23)

New research shows domestic animals link virus spread among humans and wildlife
New research carried out at Swansea University has highlighted the role domesticated animals -- both pets and livestock -- play in the spread of viruses among humans and wildlife. according to new research involving Swansea University. However, the study has revealed the patterns of how viruses are shared differs between the two major groups of RNA and DNA viruses. (2019-12-19)

NIH-developed Zika vaccine improves fetal outcomes in animal model
An experimental Zika vaccine lowered levels of virus in pregnant monkeys and improved fetal outcomes in a rhesus macaque model of congenital Zika virus infection, according to a new study in Science Translational Medicine. Scientists developed the experimental vaccine and currently are evaluating it in a Phase 2 human clinical trial. The vaccine uses a small circular piece of DNA, or plasmid, containing genes that encode Zika virus surface proteins to induce an immune response. (2019-12-19)

Dangerous bone marrow, organ transplant complication explained
Scientists have discovered the molecular mechanism behind how the common cytomegalovirus can wreak havoc on bone marrow and organ transplant patients, according to a paper published in the journal Cell & Host Microbe. The finding could help researchers develop better drugs to prevent related transplant complications. (2019-12-19)

Hepatitis D: The mystery of the virus' life cycle revealed
A team led by INRS Professor Patrick Labonté has identified the role of a key process in the replication cycle of the hepatitis D virus, an infection that is still very difficult to cure and affects 15 to 20 million people worldwide. (2019-12-19)

Researchers support new strategies for HIV control
The search for a cure to AIDS has partly focused on ways to eradicate infected cells. Now, research from Karolinska Institutet and the University of Pennsylvania shows that this approach may not be necessary for a functional cure. In a study focusing on a subset of HIV-positive individuals who can live with the virus without needing treatment, the researchers found that these people's lymphocytes suppress the virus but do not kill off infected cells. (2019-12-18)

Zika vaccine protects fetus in pregnant monkeys
An experimental vaccine against the Zika virus reduced the amount of virus in pregnant rhesus macaques and improved fetal outcomes. The work could help support development and approval of an experimental Zika DNA vaccine currently in early stage trials in humans. (2019-12-18)

Newly discovered protein gives signal for virus infection
Researchers at the University of Zurich have discovered a protein that enables adenoviruses to infect human cells. The Mib1 protein gives the virus the signal to uncoat the DNA and release it into the nucleus. Blocking this protein could therefore help people with weakened immune systems to fight dangerous viruses. (2019-12-17)

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