Current Dental Research News and Events

Current Dental Research News and Events, Dental Research News Articles.
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A fifth of adults in Sweden report dental anxiety
In Sweden, approximately one in five adults suffers from dental anxiety or phobia. The number has decreased over time, but still an important part of the population have major problems, according to a recent doctoral thesis from the University of Gothenburg. (2021-02-22)

Parents Say COVID-19 has disrupted children's dental care
A third of parents say the COVID-19 pandemic has made it difficult to get dental care for their children, a new national poll suggests. But some families may face greater challenges than others. (2021-02-15)

Role of aspirating system type in SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity among dental staff
High-volume aspirators are recommended in dental clinics during the COVID-19 pandemic, but a new study published in the JDR Clinical & Translational Research, shows that the type of aspirating system significantly affects the incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection among dental specialists (2021-02-08)

Bleeding gums may be a sign you need more vitamin C in your diet
Bleeding of the gums on gentle probing, or gingival bleeding tendency, and also bleeding in the eye, or retinal hemorrhaging, were associated with low vitamin C levels in the bloodstream. (2021-02-01)

3D printing resins in dental devices may be toxic to reproductive health
Two commercially available 3D-printable resins, which are marketed as being biocompatible for use in dental applications, readily leach compounds into their surroundings. These compounds can induce severe toxicity in the oocyte, the immature precursor of the egg which can eventually be fertilized, reports a new study in mouse oocytes. (2021-01-28)

Ancient proteins help track early milk drinking in Africa
Got milk? The 1990s ad campaign highlighted the importance of milk for health and wellbeing, but when did we start drinking the milk of other animals? And how did the practice spread? A new study led by scientists from Germany and Kenya highlights the critical role of Africa in the story of dairying, showing that communities there were drinking milk by at least 6,000 years ago. (2021-01-27)

Esophageal cancer patients show abundance of oral pathogens
DNA from various oral bacterial pathogens has been found in tumors from esophageal cancer patients. Researchers led by Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) examined bacterial pathogens in plaque and saliva from esophageal cancer patients, determining that a prevalence of three species in particular, along with alcohol consumption, is associated with a high risk of esophageal cancer. Screening of oral pathogens could therefore be used for early disease detection. (2021-01-14)

Research shapes safe dentistry during Covid-19
Leading research at Newcastle University has been used to shape how dentistry can be carried out safely during the Covid-19 pandemic by mitigating the risks of dental aerosols. (2021-01-11)

COVID-19 and dental and dental hygiene students' career plans
The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted dental education and training. The study ''COVID-19 and Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' Career Plans,'' published in the JDR Clinical & Translational Research (JDR CTR), examined the short-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on dental hygiene and dental students' career intentions. (2021-01-07)

Making therapeutic sense of antisense oligonucleotides
In a significant extension of their previous research work, researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) and Ionis Pharmaceuticals, USA, have devised a molecular structural modification that boosts the efficacy of antisense oligonucleotide-based drugs by replacing the RNA strand of a heteroduplex oligonucleotide with DNA. This advance expands the scope and clinical applicability of nucleic-acid therapeutics across an ever-widening swathe of intractable diseases including neurological disorders. (2021-01-05)

Gum disease-causing bacteria borrow growth molecules from neighbors to thrive
The human body is filled with friendly bacteria. However, some of these microorganisms, such as Veillonella parvula, may be too nice. These peaceful bacteria engage in a one-sided relationship with pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, helping the germ multiply and cause gum disease, according to a new University at Buffalo-led study. (2021-01-05)

New mechanisms to control dental procedure spray emissions
Since the onset of COVID-19 the potential risk of dental procedure spray emissions for SARS-CoV-2 transmission has challenged care providers and policy makers alike. The study, 'Mechanisms of atomization from rotary dental instruments and its mitigation,' published in the Journal of Dental Research (JDR), found that there are multiple mechanisms for atomization of fluids from rotatory instruments and that parameters can be controlled to modify key spray characteristics during the current crisis. (2020-12-23)

Coronavirus spread during dental procedures could be reduced with slower drill rotation
Researchers from Imperial College London and King's College London have found that careful selection and operation of dental drills can minimise the spread of COVID-19 through aerosols. (2020-12-17)

Researchers determine how often cancer patients develop osteonecrosis of the jaw
A landmark study by researchers from the SWOG Cancer Research Network, a cancer clinical trials group funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has found that 2.8 percent of patients on average develop osteonecrosis of the jaw, or ONJ, within three years of starting a common treatment for cancer that has spread to the bone. (2020-12-17)

Hinder handing the message -- stopping tumors from creating new blood vessels
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have found that vasohibin-1 (VASH1), a protein known to prevent the formation of new blood vessels, acts by changing the conditions of microtubules which bring blocking the certain signal from outside through encumbering transport of its message to the inner of cell. The unique function of this protein can inhibit tumor cells from spreading throughout the body, making it a notable finding for cancer therapeutic research. (2020-12-14)

Melatonin: finally, a supplement that actually boosts memory
Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) showed that melatonin's metabolite AMK can enhance the formation of long-term memories in mice. Memory of objects were tested after treatment with melatonin or two of its metabolites. Older mice that normally performed poorly on the memory task showed improvements as dosage increased. The metabolite AMK was found to be the most important as melatonin failed to improve memory if it was blocked from metabolizing into AMK. (2020-12-10)

Essential oral healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed the need for consensus on the definition of essential oral healthcare. The article 'Pandemic considerations on essential oral healthcare' provides a layered model of essential oral healthcare, integrating urgent and basic oral healthcare, as well as advanced and specialist oral healthcare. (2020-12-10)

How poor oral hygiene may result in metabolic syndrome
Researchers from TMDU identified a novel mechanism by which periodontal disease may cause metabolic syndrome. By studying patients with metabolic syndrome, the researchers demonstrated high antibody titers against Porphyromonas gingivalis, the bacterium causing periodontal disease. In a mouse model, the researchers then showed that infection with this bacterium causes systemic insulin resistance and metabolic dysfunction in skeletal muscle by altering the gut microbiome. This study shows the effect periodontal disease can have on the entire body. (2020-12-08)

Reversible stickiness is something to smile about
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have developed a cross-linker for curing dental cement that can be degraded with UV light. The polyrotaxane cross-linker contains an o-nitrobenzyl ester group that is unstable under UV irradiation. The adhesion strength of a polymer block fixed to bovine dentin with cement stabilized using the cross-linker was significantly reduced after only 2 minutes of irradiation, showing that the linker has potential to ease the removal of temporary dental interventions. (2020-12-04)

β-AR agonist therapy puts the brakes on oral cancer progression
Oral cancer has a high mortality rate that is mainly attributed to metastasis. Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) screened a panel of small chemical compounds for their ability to inhibit metastasis in oral cancer, identifying β2?AR-agonist isoxsuprine as a potential candidate. Treatment of various oral cancer cells with isoxsuprine suppressed their motility, while tumor size was significantly decreased in isoxsuprine-treated mice, suggesting that β-AR-agonist therapy could be an effective new treatment for oral cancer. (2020-12-03)

National Autism Indicators Report: health and health care of individuals with autism
In the recently published sixth report in the National Autism Indicators Report series, researchers from Drexel University's A.J. Drexel Autism Institute highlight a holistic picture of what health and health care look like across the life course for people on the autism spectrum. (2020-12-01)

TTUHSC scientist takes next step in search for bone disease treatment
For more than a decade, TTUHSC's Hiranmoy Das, Ph.D., has been investigating how KLF2 influences the development of bone and musculoskeletal diseases. Most recently, Das attempted to determine if inducing KLF2 levels in dental pulp derived stem cells will promote osteoblast and the building of new bone. His study, ''KLF2 regulates dental pulp-derived stem cell differentiation through the induction of mitophagy and altering mitochondrial metabolism,'' was published in the September issue of Redox Biology. (2020-11-20)

Taking out the trash is essential for brain health
Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have identified a protein called Wipi3 that is essential for cellular waste disposal via the alternative autophagy system. Deletion of Wipi3 in the brains of mice causes growth and motor defects attributed to neuronal accumulation of iron, resulting in neurodegeneration. However, over-expression of another alternative autophagy protein, Dram1, reverses the effects in Wipi3 deficiency, and may represent a novel treatment for neurodegenerative diseases. (2020-11-19)

Dentists from RUDN University found a reason for early deterioration of dental implants
A team of dentists from RUDN University confirmed that a change in the dominant side of chewing is a reason for the early deterioration of dental implants. Such a change makes it more difficult for a patient to get accustomed to an implant and can lead to bone tissue abnormalities. The discovery can help dentists plan the recovery process after implantation surgeries. (2020-11-18)

Paleontologists uncover three new species of extinct walruses in Orange County
Millions of years ago, in the warm Pacific Ocean off the coast of Southern California, walrus species without tusks lived abundantly. But in a new study, Cal State Fullerton paleontologists have identified three new walrus species discovered in Orange County and one of the new species has ''semi-tusks'' -- or longer teeth. (2020-11-16)

Rise in antibiotics prescribed to dental patients in England during COVID-19 lockdown
One of the unintended consequences of the COVID-19 lockdowns in England earlier this year has been a 25 per cent increase in the prescription of antibiotics by dentists, according to a new study published today in the British Dental Journal (BDJ). Prescription rates were the highest in London, with an increase of 60% for the same period and the lowest increases, less than 10%, were in the South-West of England. (2020-11-13)

New genus of chimaerid fish classified with help from Kazan University expert
A dental plate was found by Canadian national Stephen Suntok on the Pacific coast of British Columbia. Evgeny Popov, a renowned expert in chimaerids, was asked to assist in classification. (2020-11-05)

Priming the immune system to attack cancer
Research by an international team, co-led by the University of Pennsylvania's George Hajishengallis, showed how immune ''training'' transforms innate immune cells to target tumors. The findings could inform new approaches to cancer immunotherapy or even strategies for preventing tumor growth. (2020-10-29)

Most dentists have experienced aggression from patients
Roughly half of US dentists experienced verbal or reputational aggression by patients in the past year, and nearly one in four endured physical aggression, according to a new study led by researchers at NYU College of Dentistry. (2020-10-26)

Coating implants with 'artificial bone' to prevent inflammation
Bone disease is becoming increasingly prevalence in modern society due to population aging among other factors, and the use of dental and orthopedic implants to treat bone disease has been on the rise. To mitigate slow integration into the bone, Korean research team have developed a ceramic artificial bone coating with triple the adhesion strength compared to conventional coating materials. (2020-10-23)

Mechanism linking gum disease to heart disease, other inflammatory conditions discovered
The link between periodontal (gum) disease and other inflammatory conditions such as heart disease and diabetes has long been established, but the mechanism behind that association has, until now, remained a mystery. This month, a team of scientists and clinicians led by the University of Toronto's Faculty of Dentistry say they've found the reason why -- and it's related to the body's own hyperactive immune response. The findings were published in October in the Journal of Dental Research. (2020-10-20)

Report finds COVID-19 rate among dentists is less than one percent
Fewer than one percent of dentists nationwide were found to be COVID-19 positive, according to a first-of-its-kind report in the US based on data collected in June 2020. (2020-10-15)

Light stimulation makes bones heavier
Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers showed that laser ablation of bone inhibits expression of the osteogenesis inhibitor protein sclerostin without causing inflammation, unlike the conventional bur-drilling technique. Further investigations confirmed that this beneficial bio-stimulation works by inducing mechanical stress. These findings help advance research into the treatment of osteoporosis as well as specific enhancement of bone regrowth in orthopedic and dental surgery. (2020-10-08)

Oral cancer pain predicts likelihood of cancer spreading
Oral cancer is more likely to spread in patients experiencing high levels of pain, according to a team of researchers at NYU College of Dentistry that found genetic and cellular clues as to why metastatic oral cancers are so painful. (2020-10-07)

RTL1 gene a likely culprit behind temple and Kagami-Ogata syndromes
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have found that Rtl1, which is a mouse ortholog of the human RTL1 gene, appears to be the major gene responsible for muscle and placental defects in models of Temple and Kagami-Ogata syndromes, which are serious genetic conditions. Theirs is the first study to demonstrate that a domesticated gene that is specific to placental mammals plays an important role in fetal and neonatal muscle development. (2020-10-06)

Tumor progression depends on the tumor microenvironment
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) and Niigata University identified a novel mechanism by which tumors progress. By studying the role of TNF-α and TGF-β in the formation of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the researchers found that both proteins together exert a robust effect on the development of CAFs. They further found that oral cancer cells show increased tumor progression in response to TGF-β protein secreted from CAFs. The findings of this study could help develop novel cancer therapies. (2020-10-01)

Dentists from RUDN University presented a new classification of root canal shape changes
Individual characteristics of the shape and cross-section of the root canal are one of the main issues for dentists. The first stage of endodontic treatment requires detailed knowledge of root canal anatomy. A team of dentists from RUDN University studied and classified various changes in root canal shapes. The new classification will help doctors avoid diagnostic errors, better select their tools, and treat patients more efficiently. (2020-09-26)

Family care? Healed injuries suggest social behavior in ancestral wolves
Wolves today live and hunt in packs, which helps them take down large prey. But when did this group behavior evolve? An international research team has reported specimens of an ancestral wolf, Canis chihliensis, from the Ice Age of north China (~1.3 million years ago), with debilitating injuries to the jaws and leg. The wolf survived these injuries long enough to heal, supporting the likelihood of food-sharing and family care in this early canine. (2020-09-24)

Breakthrough for tomorrow's dentistry
New knowledge on the cellular makeup and growth of teeth can expedite developments in regenerative dentistry - a biological therapy for damaged teeth - as well as the treatment of tooth sensitivity. The study, which was conducted by researchers at Karolinska Institutet, is published in Nature Communications. (2020-09-23)

Increasing the effectiveness of cancer treatments: Anti-PD-L1 immunotherapy
Researh teams of Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) have uncovered how to increase the efficacy of anti-PD-L1 immunotherapy. Using a combination of molecular, biochemical, and bioinformatics approaches, they discovered that the nuclear localization of PD-L1 is controlled by acetylation at a single, specific, Lys site. In the nucleus, PD-L1 controls the expression of immune related genes. Therefore, targeting PD-L1 nuclear localization could enhance the efficacy of PD-1/PD-L1 blockade based immunotherapies. (2020-09-18)

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