Current Desire News and Events

Current Desire News and Events, Desire News Articles.
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Actively preparing or watching others prepare food can lead to eating more
Food preparation (both actively preparing food yourself as well as watching others) can lead to eating more, a new study in the journal Appetite reports. Researchers believe this could lead to weight gain or -- depending on an individual's diet -- could be a useful way to get people to eat more healthily. (2021-02-23)

UTEP professor's study may lead to solutions for overeating
The 10-member team made discoveries about a specific area of the brain tied to recollection and the desire to seek and consume food. It could lead to a way to inhibit the desire to overeat. (2021-02-12)

CO2 laser therapy helps improve sexual function in postmenopausal women with breast cancer
CLEVELAND, Ohio (Feb 3, 2021)--Postmenopausal women often complain of painful intercourse or a lack of desire caused by decreased estrogen levels, which affect vaginal elasticity and lubrication. Survivors of breast cancer typically experience worse symptoms as a result of cancer treatments, and concerns exist regarding hormone therapies. A new study suggests that fractional CO2 laser therapy may help. Study results are published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2021-02-03)

What makes people want more self-control?
A new study shows that people differ greatly in their desire to increase their self-control, and that merely having low self-control is not sufficient to induce a strong desire for better self-control. Desire for better self-control shows most potently after people acknowledge the relevance of self-control for their present needs. As such, the findings explain why so many self-control interventions fail, and direct future efforts to improve self-control. (2021-02-01)

Research shows preference for male children is declining in Bangladesh
Research from the University of Kent has demonstrated a decline in 'son preference' by women of childbearing age in Bangladesh. However, the study also shows that fertility decisions are still influenced according to son preference. (2021-01-22)

Having plants at home improved psychological well-being during lockdown
This was agreed by 74% of the more than 4,200 respondents in 46 countries. In fact, more than half of them (55.8%) stated that they would have preferred to have more plants in their house during that difficult period. (2021-01-21)

Stealing the spotlight in the field and kitchen
New dry beans from UC Davis combine desirable qualities for both farmers and consumers (2021-01-20)

COVID-19: Science scepticism may be reinforced by UK rush to approve vaccines
Former director of public health Professor John Ashton has said that scientific scepticism may be reinforced by the UK's rush to approve COVID vaccines for public use and the apparent political desire to be the first out of the blocks in contrast to our European neighbours. (2021-01-14)

More women embracing 'going flat' after mastectomy
A growing number of women forgoing reconstruction after a mastectomy say they're satisfied with their choice, even as some did not feel supported by their physician, according to a study led by researchers at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. (2021-01-04)

Children more willing to punish if the wrongdoer is 'taught a lesson'
Many children are willing to make personal sacrifices to punish wrongdoers -- and even more so if they believe punishment will teach the transgressor a lesson, a new Yale study published Nov. 23, 2020 in the journal Nature Human Behaviour shows. (2020-11-23)

Dogs are sensitive to their owners' choice despite their own preference
Inspired by work on infants, researchers investigated whether dogs' behaviors are guided by human displays of preference or by the animals' own choices. They found that dogs' looking times, but not fetching behavior, were influenced by the owner's expression of preference. Although the studies did not demonstrate that dogs override their own preferences for an object, the results suggested that the owners' expressed preference was perceived by the dogs and guided their perceptual focus. (2020-11-12)

Gambling addiction: an aid from patients' stories
How do people affected by pathological gambling tell their story? What information can we extract from their narratives? For the first time, a study conducted by SISSA and University of Roma Tre has analysed in detail the words and linguistic constructions used by people suffering from gambling. The researchers identified several characteristic elements of their emotional and cognitive state. The study, published in Addictive disorders and their treatment, opens up new scenarios for the development of recovery and prevention paths based on linguistic skills. (2020-11-10)

Menstrual dysfunction is more common among young athletes than among non-athletes
Menstrual dysfunction is more prevalent in young Finnish athletes than it is among non-athletes of a similar age, but athletes experience less body weight dissatisfaction than non-athletes do. These findings are from a recent study at the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. The study was conducted among members of sports clubs who exercised at least four times a week (athletes) and non-members (non-athletes). (2020-10-28)

COVID-19 anxiety linked to body image issues
A new study has found that anxiety and stress directly linked to COVID-19 could be causing a number of body image issues. The research, which involved 506 UK adults, found that worries linked to COVID-19 were associated with body dissatisfaction and a desire for thinness in women, and associated with body fat dissatisfaction and a desire for muscularity in men. (2020-10-22)

Study explores link between methamphetamine use and risky sexual behavior
Recreational use of the illicit drug methamphetamine has long been associated with increases in overall impatient and risky behavior. Now, a new study by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers affirms that meth use increases not only sexual desire but also, specifically and measurably, the risk of casual sex without a condom for those who have an increase in sexual desire. (2020-09-30)

Is it time to reframe the assisted dying debate?
Several articles published by The BMJ today explore the debate around assisted dying, in which, subject to safeguards, terminally ill people who are near to death, suffering, and of sound mind, could ask for drugs that they would take to end their lives. (2020-09-30)

Many women suffering from severe migraine might avoid pregnancy, but should they?
A survey of 607 women who suffer from severe migraine found twenty percent of the respondents are currently avoiding pregnancy because of their migraines. The women avoiding pregnancy due to severe migraine tend to be in their thirties, are more likely to have migraine triggered by menstruation, and are more likely to have very frequent attacks (chronic migraine) compared to their counterparts who are not avoiding pregnancy, according to a new study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2020-09-15)

Site of male sexual desire uncovered in brain
The locus of male sexual desire has been uncovered in specific regions of brain tissue where a key gene named aromatase is present, reports a new study in mice. The gene regulates sexual behavior in men, and thus can be targeted by drugs to either increase its function for low sexual desire or decrease its function for compulsive sexual desire, scientists said. Aromatase converts testosterone to estrogen in the brain, which drives male sexual activity. (2020-09-11)

Australia's wish list of exotic pets
Unsustainable trade of species is the major pathway for the introduction of invasive alien species at distant localities at higher frequencies. It is also a major driver of over-exploitation of wild populations. In a new study, published in the open-access journal Neobiota, scientists estimate the desire of Australians to own non-native and/or illegal pets and the major trends in this practice. In addition, the team suggests ways to improve biosecurity awareness in the country. (2020-08-20)

Pizza study shows body copes surprisingly well with one-off calorie indulgence
Young men can eat twice as much food as they need to feel 'full', research shows. (2020-07-24)

UK's Modern Slavery Act challenging for universities -- new study
The UK's universities are struggling to live up to the spirit and ambition of the Modern Slavery Act, hampered by poor oversight of their supply chains, a lack of skills and resource in supply chain management, a focus on reducing costs, and lacklustre engagement from many in senior management, a new study from the University of Bath shows. (2020-07-21)

Male sexual worries: What has changed in the post-Viagra age?
Scientists report a change in why men seek help for sexual problems, with fewer men complaining about impotence (erectile dysfunction) and premature ejaculation, and more men, especially younger men, complaining about low sexual desire and curvature of the penis (Peyronie's disease). (2020-07-18)

Cost prevents one in five US women from using their preferred contraception
Recent Supreme Court Ruling Will Increase Birth Control Costs for Many Women, Make it Less Likely They Will Use the Birth Control They Want (2020-07-13)

New study reveals people more likely to donate when reminded of own mortality
New research from the UBC Sauder School of Business shows that people are 30 per cent more likely to donate their assets when faced with their own mortality. (2020-07-08)

Do we know what we want in a romantic partner? No more than a random stranger would
New research coming out of the University of California, Davis, suggests that people's ideal partner preferences do not reflect any unique personal insight (2020-07-06)

Center for BrainHealth advances understanding of brain connectivity in cannabis users
Center for BrainHealth® recently examined underlying brain networks in long-term cannabis users to identify patterns of brain connectivity when the users crave or have a desire to consume cannabis. While regional brain activation and static connectivity in response to cravings have been studied before, fluctuations in brain network connectivity had not yet been examined in cannabis users. The findings from this study will help support the development of better treatment strategies for cannabis dependence. (2020-07-02)

'Playing hard to get' really works; here's why
A team of researchers from the University of Rochester and the Israeli-based Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya examined the effects of playing hard to get, a mating strategy that is likely to instill a certain degree of uncertainty. In a new study they show that making the chase harder increases a potential mate's desirability. (2020-06-08)

Get it over with, or procrastinate? New research explores our decision-making process
New research from the UBC Sauder School of Business may have figured out why. The study, published in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, reveals key insights into how excitement, anticipation and dread factor into people's decision-making. (2020-06-02)

Aiming for an enduring relationship
Why do some couples stay together yet others split up? Timing and desire for commitment are key indicators, according to new insights from SMU Assistant Professor Kenneth Tan. (2020-06-01)

Scarcity reduces consumers' concerns about prices, even during a pandemic, research shows
New research published in the Journal of Consumer Marketing Research finds that scarcity actually decreases consumers' tendency to use price to judge a product's quality. (2020-05-13)

How has the COVID-19 pandemic affected women's sexual behavior?
A recent study examines the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on female sexual behavior. (2020-05-12)

The feeling a limb doesn't belong is linked to lack of brain structure and connection
People with body integrity dysphoria (BID) often feel as though one of their healthy limbs isn't meant to be a part of their bodies. They may act as though the limb is missing or even seek its amputation 'to feel complete.' Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on May 7, 2020 have found that these feelings that a limb doesn't belong are mirrored in the brains of people with this condition. (2020-05-07)

COVID-19 baby boom? This new study suggests perhaps not
Over 80% of people surveyed in a study do not plan to conceive during the COVID-19 crisis, perhaps putting to rest suggestions that the lockdown could lead to rise in birth numbers. (2020-05-07)

Memory misfires help selfish maintain their self-image
When asked to recall how generous they were in the past, selfish people tend to remember being more benevolent than they actually were, according to a series of experiments by Yale psychologists and economists at University of Zurich published April 29, 2020 in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-04-29)

How does sugar drive consumption? Scientists discover gut-brain sugar sensor in mice
Artificial sweeteners have never fully succeeded in impersonating sugar. Now, a Columbia study in mice has identified a brain mechanism that may explain why. (2020-04-15)

Health warning labels on alcohol and snacks may reduce consumption
Image-and-text health warning labels, similar to those on cigarette boxes, show potential for reducing the consumption of alcoholic drinks and energy-dense snacks, such as chocolate bars, according to a study published in the open-access journal BMC Public Health. (2020-04-01)

Experiences of undesired effects of hormonal contraception
A study of women who experienced mental ill-health from a hormonal contraception indicates they value their mental well-being higher than a satisfactory sex life. Their experiences can influence their choice of contraception. This is one of four themes that researchers have identified in interviews with 24 women who experience negative effects of some hormonal contraception. The study, from Linköping University in Sweden, has been published in the European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care. (2020-03-31)

The desire for information: Blissful ignorance or painful truth?
A new study looks closely at why many people are so likely to avoid useful information -- even if it benefits their health. While creating a test that allows anyone to test their own preferences for seeking out or avoiding info, our researchers found, among other things, that impatient people are more likely to avoid learning information, preferring to avoid the prospect of immediate pain rather than make better long-term decisions. (2020-03-30)

People fearful of taking part in vital clinical research
A review, led by researchers at the University of York and Hull York Medical School, has found that fear about testing new treatments and possible side effects was the most common reason given by patients for not wanting to participate. (2020-03-16)

Poor physical health a barrier for job seekers with serious mental illness
People with serious mental illness believe their physical health problems rather than psychological health make it difficult for them to find jobs, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-03-12)

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