Current Diamond News and Events

Current Diamond News and Events, Diamond News Articles.
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Climate-friendly foam building insulation may do more harm than good
The use of the polymeric flame retardant PolyFR in 'eco-friendly' foam plastic building insulation may be harmful to human health and the environment, according to a new commentary in Environmental Science & Technology. The authors' analysis identifies several points during the lifecycle of foam insulation that may expose workers, communities, and ecosystems to PolyFR and its potentially toxic breakdown products. (2021-02-23)

Locked MOFs are the key to high porosity
Sophisticated geometry design gives rise to a new form of crystalline material. (2021-02-18)

Scientists able to see how potential cancer treatment reacts in single cell
Using a 185 metre beamline at the Diamond synchrotron, researchers could see how Osmium, a rare precious metal that could be used for cancer treatments, reacts in a single human lung cancer cell. This is a major step forward in discovering new anti-cancer drugs for researchers at the University of Warwick. (2021-02-17)

Antibody-based COVID-19 treatments work best in concert with immune cells
Antibody-based drugs have been authorized for emergency use in COVID-19 patients by the Food and Drug Administration. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered that the ability to interact with other elements of the immune system is an indispensable part of the effectiveness of such antibodies. The findings could help improve the design of the next generation of antibody-based COVID-19 drugs. (2021-02-16)

Time perception and sense of touch: a new connection
The percept of time relates to the sense of touch. A new SISSA study ''A sensory integration account for time perception'' published in PLOS Computational Biology uncovers this connection. The main clue leading to the new theory is that the perceived duration of a vibration increases not only in relation to actual elapsed time but also in relation to the intensity of the vibration. (2021-02-10)

'Magnetic graphene' forms a new kind of magnetism
Researchers have identified a new form of magnetism in so-called magnetic graphene, which could point the way toward understanding superconductivity in this unusual type of material. (2021-02-08)

Researchers use nanomaterials to make 2D diamond clusters at room temperature
2D hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a promising material that can undergo transition to strong, super lightweight films. Researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering led by Elisa Riedo have discovered that h-BN in layered, molecule-thin 2D sheets can phase transition to c-BN at room temperature. (2021-01-26)

Diamonds need voltage
Diamonds are fascinating - as jewellery but also because of the extreme hardness of the material. How exactly this variant of carbon is formed deep underground and under extremely high pressures and temperatures remains a mystery. Now, researchers from the Russian Academy of Sciences Novosibirsk, collaborating with the German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ, have documented a new influencing factor in theory and experiment. Weak electric fields can be a decisive catalyst for its formation (2021-01-21)

Squeezing a rock-star material could make it stable enough for solar cells
A promising lead halide perovskite is great at converting sunlight to electricity, but it breaks down at room temperature. Now scientists have discovered how to stabilize it with pressure from a diamond anvil cell. The required pressure is well within the reach of industrial manufacturing requirements. (2021-01-21)

Putty-like composites of gallium metal with potential for real-world application
Researchers at the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) created a novel functional composite of gallium with putty or paste-like physical properties. The composite possesses excellent electromagnetic shielding properties as well as thermal conductivity. (2021-01-01)

Microfabricated elastic diamonds improve material's electronic properties
Overcoming a key obstacle in achieving diamond-based electronic and optoelectronic devices, researchers have presented a new way to fabricate micrometer-sized diamonds that can elastically stretch. (2020-12-31)

Stretching diamond for next-generation microelectronics
Diamond is the hardest material in nature. But out of many expectations, it also has great potential as an excellent electronic material. A joint research team led by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has demonstrated for the first time the large, uniform tensile elastic straining of microfabricated diamond arrays through the nanomechanical approach. Their findings have shown the potential of strained diamonds as prime candidates for advanced functional devices in microelectronics, photonics, and quantum information technologies. (2020-12-31)

Scientists and philosopher team up, propose a new way to categorize minerals
Minerals are the most durable, information-rich objects we can study to understand our planet's origin and evolution. However, the current classification system leaves unanswered questions for planetary scientists, geobiologists, paleontologists and others who strive to understand minerals' historical context. A new evolutionary approach to classifying minerals complements the existing protocols and offers the opportunity to rigorously document Earth's history. (2020-12-21)

Researchers develop Si-based super-high frequency nanoelectromechanical resonator
Recently, a group led by Prof. GUO Guoping from the University of Science and Technology of China of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, collaborating with Prof. ZHANG Zhen's group from Uppsala University, Sweden, designed and fabricated CMOS-compatible suspended SHT devices which worked as super-high frequency nanoelectromechanical resonators. The work was published in Advanced Materials. (2020-12-15)

Experiment to test quantum gravity just got a bit less complicated
Is gravity a quantum phenomenon? That has been one of the big outstanding questions in physics for decades. Together with colleagues from the UK, Anupam Mazumdar, a physicist from the University of Groningen, proposed an experiment that could settle the issue. However, it requires studying two very large entangled quantum systems in freefall. In a new paper, Mazumdar presents a way to reduce background noise to make this experiment more manageable. (2020-12-08)

Pollution from cooking remains in atmosphere for longer - study
Particulate emissions from cooking stay in the atmosphere for longer than previously thought, making a prolonged contribution to poor air quality and human health, according to a new study. (2020-12-08)

RUDN University physicists described a new type of amorphous solid bodies
Many substances with different chemical and physical properties, from diamonds to graphite, are made up of carbon atoms. Amorphous forms of solid carbon do not have a fixed crystal structure and consist of structural units--nanosized graphene particles. A team of physicists from RUDN University studied the structure of amorphous carbon and suggested classifying it as a separate type of amorphous solid bodies: a molecular amorphic with enforced fragmentation. (2020-12-02)

Transportation of water into the deep Earth by Al-phase D
Researchers at Ehime University have recently measured the propagation speed of ultrasonic waves in an aluminum-rich hydrous mineral called Al-phase D at pressure conditions relevant to the Earth's deep mantle. Their results suggest that seismic shear anomalies observed locally beneath subduction zones may reveal the presence of hydrous minerals in the uppermost lower mantle, which would have important implications for the Earth's interior because hydrogen affects considerably the physical and chemical properties of mantle minerals. (2020-11-30)

Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier
The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a study led by UCL researchers in the i-sense McKendry group. (2020-11-25)

Memories of past events retain remarkable fidelity even as we age
Even though people tend to remember fewer details about past events as time goes by, the details they do remember are retained with remarkable fidelity, according to a new study. This finding holds true regardless of the age of the person or the amount of time that elapsed since the event took place. (2020-11-24)

Controlling fully integrated nanodiamonds
Physicists at M√ľnster University have succeeded in fully integrating nanodiamonds into nanophotonic circuits and at the same time addressing several of these nanodiamonds optically. The study creates the basis for future applications in the field of quantum sensing schemes or quantum information processors. The results have been published in the journal Nano Letters. (2020-11-23)

Lethal brain infections in mice thwarted by decoy molecule
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a molecule that protects mice from brain infections caused by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), a mosquito-borne virus notorious for causing fast-spreading, deadly outbreaks in Mexico, Central America and northern South America. (2020-11-18)

Scientists defy nature to make insta-bling at room temperature
An international team of scientists has defied nature to make diamonds in minutes in a laboratory at room temperature - a process that normally requires billions of years, huge amounts of pressure and super-hot temperatures. (2020-11-17)

Sussex research points to new effective breast cancer treatment
An international five-year study led by scientists at the University of Sussex has provided strong evidence for an effective new target for breast cancer treatment. The study, The structure-function relationship of oncogenic LMTK3 being published in Science Advances, involved researchers from seven institutions across three countries including the UKs Diamond Light Source. It suggests LMTK3 inhibitors could be effectively used for treatment of breast cancer, and potentially other types of cancer such as lung, stomach, thyroid and bladder cancer patients (2020-11-13)

Antiferromagnetic material's giant stride towards application
The quest for high throughput intelligent computing paradigms - for big data and artificial intelligence - and the ever-increasing volume of digital information has led to an intensified demand for high-speed and low-power consuming next-generation electronic devices. The 'forgotten' world of antiferromagnets (AFM), a class of magnetic materials, offers promise in future electronic device development and complements present-day ferromagnet-based spintronic technologies. (2020-11-12)

Skoltech scientists developed a novel bone implant manufacturing method
Scientists from the Skoltech Center for Design, Manufacturing, and Materials (CDMM) have developed a method for designing and manufacturing complex-shaped ceramic bone implants with a controllable porous structure, which largely enhances tissue fusion efficiency. Specimens of designed ceramic implants were fabricated at a 3D printer. This method enables changing the porous structure so as to produce implants of different densities to accommodate the patients' individual needs. (2020-11-12)

Connecting two classes of unconventional superconductors
The understanding of unconventional superconductivity is one of the most challenging and fascinating tasks of solid-state physics. Different classes of unconventional superconductors share that superconductivity emerges near a magnetic phase despite the underlying physics is different. (2020-11-11)

Getting single-crystal diamond ready for electronics
Researchers from Osaka University and collaborating partners polished single-crystal diamond to near-atomic smoothness without damaging it. This will improve the performance and sustainability of future electronics. (2020-11-10)

Hybrid photoactive perovskites imaged with atomic resolution for the first-time
A new technique has been developed allowing reliable atomic-resolution images to be taken, for the first time, of hybrid photoactive perovskite thin films - highly favourable materials for efficient photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications. These images have significant implications for improving the performance of solar cell materials and have unlocked the next level of ability to understand these technologically important materials. The breakthrough is detailed in a new paper to be published in Science on 30 October, called Atomic-scale microstructure of metal halide perovskite. (2020-10-29)

Rice finds path to nanodiamond from graphene
Rice University researchers expand their theory on converting graphene into 2D diamond, or diamane. (2020-10-29)

Scientists discover unusual materials properties at ultrahigh pressure
An international team of scientists from NUST MISIS (Russia), Linköping University (Sweden) and University of Bayreuth (Germany) found that, contrary to the usual physical and chemical laws, the structure of some materials does not condense at ultrahigh pressures. Actually, it forms a porous framework filled with gas molecules. This happened with samples of Os, Hf, and W put together with N in a diamond anvil at a pressure of one million atmospheres. The discovery is described in Angewandte Chemie. (2020-10-20)

Natural nanodiamonds in oceanic rocks
Natural diamonds can form through low pressure and temperature geological processes on Earth, as stated in an article published in the journal Geochemical Perspectives Letters. (2020-10-16)

Rochester researchers synthesize room temperature superconducting material
Compressing simple molecular solids with hydrogen at extremely high pressures, University of Rochester scientists have, for the first time, created material that is superconducting at room temperature. Featured as the cover story in Nature, the work was conducted by the lab of Ranga Dias. His research team combined hydrogen with carbon and sulfur to photochemically synthesize simple organic-derived carbonaceous sulfur hydride in a diamond anvil cell. (2020-10-14)

UNLV and University of Rochester physicists observe room-temperature superconductivity
Physicists from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and the University of Rochester have made a breakthrough in the long sought-after quest for a room-temperature superconductor, what they call the ''holy grail'' of energy efficiency. (2020-10-14)

Ultra-sensitive nanothermometer under ambient conditions
Nanoscale temperature measurement with high sensitivity is important to studying many phenomena ranging from heat dissipation in nanocircuits to thermal processes in live systems. The most sensitive nanothermometer working under ambient conditions is demonstrated by hybridizing the critical magnetism of magnetic nanoparticles and the ultra-sensitive diamond-based magnetometer. The sensitivity of the hybrid nanothermometer is as high as 76 uK/sqrt(Hz). The ultra-sensitive nanothermometer offers a new tool to investigate thermal processes in nanoscale systems. (2020-10-14)

Diamond-studded silk wound dressing detects infection and improves healing
Scientists have developed a next generation wound dressing that can detect infection and improve healing in burns, skin grafts and chronic wounds. (2020-10-13)

Diamonds are a quantum scientist's best friend
New research details the phenomenon of what is called ''triplet superconductivity'' in diamond. Triplet superconductivity occurs when electrons move in a composite spin state rather than as a single pair. This is an extremely rare, yet efficient form of superconductivity that until now has only been known to occur in one or two other materials, and only theoretically in diamonds. (2020-10-07)

Diamonds found with gold in Canada's Far North offer clues to Earth's early history
The presence of diamonds in an outcrop atop an unrealized gold deposit in Canada's Far North mirrors the association found above the world's richest gold mine, according to University of Alberta research that fills in blanks about the thermal conditions of Earth's crust three billion years ago. (2020-10-06)

Scientists at NTU Singapore, MIT make electrifying diamond find
Diamond could conduct electricity like metals when deformed to strains at the nanoscale, according to predictions from a study by an international team of scientists led by NTU Singapore and MIT. Using computer simulations, the team, which also includes researchers from Russia, has shown as an early proof-of-concept that when bent, nanoscale diamond needles could reversibly alter their geometry and hence their electrical properties, giving them a metal-like conductivity at room temperature and pressure. (2020-10-05)

Turning diamond into metal
Researchers have discovered a way to tweak tiny needles of diamond in a controlled way to transform their electronic properties, dialing them from insulating, through semiconducting, all the way to highly conductive, or metallic. This can be induced dynamically and reversed at will, with no degradation of the diamond material. (2020-10-05)

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