Current Diarrhea News and Events

Current Diarrhea News and Events, Diarrhea News Articles.
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Kittens could hold key to understanding deadly diarrheal disease in children
Kittens could be the model for understanding infectious, sometimes deadly, diarrheal disease in both animals and children. (2021-02-23)

Radioactive bone cement found to be safer in treating spinal tumors
A radioactive bone cement that's injected into bone to provide support and local irradiation is proving to be a safer alternative to conventional radiation therapy for bone tumors, according to a study led by University of California, Irvine researchers. (2021-02-16)

Multi-model approach could help farmers prepare for, contain PEDV outbreaks
Researchers used a three-model approach to trace the between-farm spread of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), as well as to analyze the efficacy of different control strategies in these scenarios. (2021-02-11)

Inflamed environment is C. diff paradise
A new study shows that the inflammation caused by Clostridioides difficile (C. diff) infection gives the pathogen a two-fold advantage: by both creating an inhospitable environment for competing bacteria and providing nutrients that enable C. diff to thrive. (2021-01-19)

Breakthrough on diarrhea virus opens up for new vaccines
Researchers at Umeå University in Sweden have for the first time at the atomic level succeeded in mapping what a virus looks like that causes diarrhea and annually kills about 50,000 children in the world. The discovery may in the long run provide the opportunity for completely new types of treatments for other viral diseases such as COVID-19. (2021-01-11)

Antibiotics not needed after most sinus surgeries: randomized controlled trial
Randomized controlled trial comparing antibiotics and placebo after routine endoscopic sinus surgery found no difference in outcomes including infection rates and symptoms. More gastrointestinal side effects were reported in patients taking antibiotics. (2021-01-06)

Shiga toxin's not supposed to kill you
E. coli food poisoning is one of the worst food poisonings, causing bloody diarrhea and kidney damage. But all the carnage might be just an unintended side effect, report researchers from UConn Health. Their findings might lead to more effective treatments for this potentially deadly disease. (2021-01-06)

Toxin provides clues to long-term effects of diarrhea caused by E. coli
A study from researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that a toxin produced by E. coli changes intestinal cells to benefit itself, an ability that could provide a clue to why the bacteria have been linked to nutritional problems such as malnutrition and stunted growth. (2020-12-09)

Specific bacterium in the gut linked to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
Researchers at the University of Gothenburg have detected a connection between Brachyspira, a genus of bacteria in the intestines, and IBS -- especially the form that causes diarrhea. Although the discovery needs confirmation in larger studies, there is hope that it might lead to new remedies for many people with irritable bowel syndrome. (2020-11-25)

How rotavirus causes severe gastrointestinal disease
Using intercellular calcium waves, rotavirus amplifies its ability to cause disease beyond the cells it directly infects. This is the first virus identified to activate ADP-mediated intercellular calcium waves. (2020-11-19)

Study examines trends in symptoms experienced at the end of life
A new analysis published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society indicates that fewer older adults may be experiencing certain symptoms that can restrict their activity at the end of life. (2020-11-04)

Review finds almost 20% of COVID-19 patients only show gastrointestinal symptoms
Almost one in five patients with COVID-19 may only show gastrointestinal symptoms, according to a review of academic studies published in the journal Abdominal Radiology. The findings of the review suggest abdominal radiologists need to remain vigilant during the pandemic while imaging patients. (2020-11-03)

Microbes in the gut could be protective against hazardous radiation exposure
A study by scientists at UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and colleagues showed that mice exposed to potentially lethal levels of total body radiation were protected from radiation damage if they had specific types of bacteria in their gut. They demonstrated that the bacteria mitigated radiation exposure and enhanced the recovery of blood cell production as well as repair of the gastrointestinal tract. (2020-10-30)

Swine coronavirus replicates in human cells
A strain of coronavirus that has devastated the pork industry has the potential to infect humans as well, according to new research from the Baric lab at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health. (2020-10-14)

Biomedical sciences researchers find new way to prevent and cure rotavirus, other viral infections
A combination of two substances secreted by the immune system can cure and prevent rotavirus infection, as well as potentially treat other viral infections that target epithelial cells, which cover body surfaces such as skin, blood vessels, organs and the urinary tract, according to researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. (2020-10-02)

Study finds surprisingly little difference in hospitalization rates between children with COVID-19
As the fall approaches, pediatric hospitals will start seeing children with seasonal influenza A and B. At the same time, COVID-19 will be co-circulating in communities with the flu and other respiratory viruses, making it more difficult to identify and prevent the novel coronavirus. (2020-09-08)

Factors that raise the risk of mortality among children with several acute malnutrition
#AJCN review identifies independent predictors of inpatient mortality among children with severe acute malnutrition: HIV infection, diarrhea, pneumonia, shock, lack of appetite, and low weight-to-height ratio. The authors found that children with a low weight-to-height ratio at hospital admission were at highest risk of mortality. ''Early recognition of these prognostic factors within the community, alongside risk stratification at hospital admission, may help reduce inpatient mortality among children with severe acute malnutrition,'' said author Jonathan Sturgeon. (2020-09-04)

Genomic analysis of STEC in a child reveals insights on a virulent, emerging fo
University at Buffalo researchers have completed the genomic analysis of an increasingly common strain of Shiga-toxin E. coli (STEC) that can cause severe disease outbreaks. (2020-09-02)

Poor hygiene is significant risk for antimicrobial-resistant bacteria colonization
Scientists have found clear indicators for how the interaction of poor hygiene and antibiotic use contribute to the colonization of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) bacteria in humans, a problem that contributes to hundreds of thousands of deaths annually. (2020-08-14)

USC scientists identify the order of COVID-19's symptoms
COVID-19 has some symptoms in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tracts that may help doctors rule out flu or other illnesses and hasten treatment. (2020-08-13)

Multi-species bacterial communities bounce back from environmental disturbances
Perturbations in the environment are common, and communities consisting of several species seem to find their way around the crisis. Species immigration is beneficial for community recovery. (2020-08-10)

GI symptoms linked to behavioral problems in children, especially those with autism
A new UC Davis Health study found that common gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation and bloating are linked to troubling sleep problems, self-harm and physical complaints in preschool children. According to the study, published Aug. 6 in Autism Research, these GI symptoms are much more common and potentially disruptive in young kids with autism. (2020-08-10)

Viral dark matter exposed: Metagenome database detects phage-derived antibacterial enzyme
In a pioneer study published in Cell Host & Microbe - Researchers at Osaka City University and The Institute for Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, reported intestinal bacterial and viral metagenome information from the fecal samples of 101 healthy Japanese individuals. This analysis, leveraging host bacteria-phage associations, detected phage-derived antibacterial enzymes that control pathobionts. As proof-of-concept, phage-derived endolysins are shown to regulate C. difficile infection in mice. (2020-07-10)

Microbiome confers resistance to cholera
Many parts of the world are in the midst of a deadly pandemic of cholera, an extreme form of watery diarrhea. UC Riverside scientists have discovered specific gut bacteria make some people resistant to it -- a finding that could save lives. (2020-06-29)

Why bacterial toxins are 'fascinating machines of death'
Bacterial toxins causing different illnesses share similar molecular mechanisms in a finding that could help treatment development as well as explain the emergence of new diseases. (2020-06-25)

New review helps translate probiotic science into practical primary care recommendations
Probiotic supplements are widely available and are promoted as a general way to support the gut microbiome and promote health. A new publication in the Journal of Family Practice summarizes the latest evidence on using probiotics for a variety of specific health conditions, providing practical recommendations to assist primary care physicians in advising their patients. The article, authored by current International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics board members. (2020-06-01)

Celiac disease linked to common chemical pollutants
Elevated blood levels of toxic chemicals found in pesticides, nonstick cookware, and fire retardants have been tied to an increased risk for celiac disease in young people, new research shows. (2020-05-12)

COVID-19 symptom tracker smartphone app could predict outbreak hotspots
Daily symptoms logged by more than two and a half million users of the COVID-19 Symptom Tracker, a mobile application launched in March 2020, suggest the tool could help to predict geographical hotspots of COVID-19 incidence up to a week in advance of official public health reports. (2020-05-05)

New COVID-19 guidance for gastroenterologists
AGA has published new expert recommendations in Gastroenterology: AGA Institute Rapid Review of the GI and Liver Manifestations of COVID-19, Meta-Analysis of International Data, and Recommendations for the Consultative Management of Patients with COVID-19. (2020-05-04)

Organoid models reveal how the COVID-19 virus infects human intestinal cells
A new analysis of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, reveals that the pathogen can infect and replicate in cells that line the inside of the human intestines. (2020-05-01)

To prevent antimicrobial resistance, vaccinate the world's kids
Childhood vaccination may be a powerful tool in the fight against antimicrobial resistance in low- and middle-income countries, finds a new analysis led by researchers University of California, Berkeley. The study found that immunization with two common vaccines -- the pneumococcal conjugate and rotavirus vaccines -- significantly reduces the rates of acute respiratory infections and diarrhea among small children in these settings. And, with fewer children getting sick or severely sick, fewer are receiving antibiotic treatment. (2020-04-29)

Digestive symptoms are prominent among COVID-19 patients reveals study in The American Journal of Gastroenterology
The American Journal of Gastroenterology published today a new study that reveals digestive symptoms, including diarrhea, are common in COVID-19 patients. The study comes from the Wuhan Medical Treatment Expert Group for COVID-19 in China. (2020-03-18)

'Scrambled' cells fix themselves
In the human body, cells shield themselves from disease-causing microbes by scrambling their lipids into liquids, according to new research by an international team headed by the Montreal Clinical Research Institute and Université de Montréal. (2020-01-28)

Algae shown to improve gastrointestinal health
A green, single-celled organism called Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has served as a model species for topics spanning algae-based biofuels to plant evolution. While algae have been used as dietary nutraceuticals that provide beneficial oils, vitamins, proteins, carbohydrates and antioxidants, the benefits of consuming C. reinhardtii were previously unexplored. Researchers have now completed the first study in humans demonstrating that C. reinhardtii helps improve human gastrointestinal problems related to irritable bowel syndrome, including diarrhea, gas and bloating. (2020-01-27)

Study: Pig virus is easily transmitted among chickens and turkeys
The first animal study of a pig virus' potential to jump to another species shows that the virus, once introduced to a select group of birds, is easily transmitted to healthy chickens and turkeys. (2020-01-15)

Less severe cases of diarrheal illness can still lead to child mortality, research shows
Diarrheal diseases are a leading cause of death for young children, accounting for nine percent of all deaths worldwide in children under 5 years of age, with most occurring in children under two years of age. Now, researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) found that even milder cases of diarrheal diseases can lead to death in young children. (2020-01-09)

Researchers develop predictive tools to tackle childhood diarrheal disease outbreaks in Botswana
Virginia Tech professor Kathleen Alexander and her research team discovered a critical link between environmental dynamics and human health. With this knowledge, researchers will have the capacity to begin to predict when diarrheal disease outbreaks will reoccur. Their findings were recently published in Nature Communications. (2020-01-07)

Researchers develop predictive tools to tackle childhood diarrheal disease outbreaks
Kathy Alexander, a professor of fish and wildlife conservation in the College of Natural Resources and Environment at Virginia Tech discovered an astonishing and robust link between environmental change and environmental dynamics, which ties human health to the health of the ecosystem. With this knowledge, researchers will be able to predict when diarrheal disease will reoccur. (2020-01-03)

Scientists link La Niña climate cycle to increased diarrhea
A study in Botswana by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health scientists finds that spikes in cases of life-threatening diarrhea in young children are associated with La Niña climate conditions. The findings published in the journal Nature Communications could provide the basis for an early-warning system that would allow public health officials to prepare for periods of increased diarrhea cases as long as seven months ahead of time. (2019-12-30)

Russian scientists studied the effect of selenium on the properties of basil
Today many agricultural plants are grown using hydroponics, i.e. in artificial soilless environments. The source of nutrients for the plants is a special substrate surrounding their roots. Thanks to this method agriculturists can harvest the plants all year round and control and adjust the conditions of cultivation. (2019-12-12)

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