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Current Dietary Fiber News and Events, Dietary Fiber News Articles.
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Machine intelligence accelerates research into mapping brains
Scientists in Japan's brain science project have used machine intelligence to improve the accuracy and reliability of a powerful brain-mapping technique, a new study reports. Their development, published on December 18th in Scientific Reports, gives researchers more confidence in using the technique to untangle the human brain's wiring and to better understand the changes in this wiring that accompany neurological or mental disorders such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. (2020-12-18)

World's first transmission of 1 Petabit/s using a single-core multimode optical fiber
A group of researchers from the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT, Japan) and NOKIA Bell Labs (USA) and Prysimian Group (France) succeeded in the world's first transmission exceeding 1 petabit per second in a single-core multi-mode optical fiber. This increases the current record transmission in a multi-mode fiber by a factor of 2.5. The wideband optical transmission was enabled by mode multiplexers and a transmission fiber optimized for high optical bandwidth. (2020-12-18)

Carbon capture's next top model
Creating accurate, detailed models is key to scaling up carbon capture technology. A recent paper led by the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering examines and compares the various modeling approaches for hollow fiber membrane contactors (HFMCs), a type of carbon capture technology. The group analyzed over 150 cited studies of multiple modeling approaches to help researchers choose the technique best suited to their research. (2020-12-16)

Engineers develop soft robotic gripper
Scientists often look to nature for cues when designing robots - some robots mimic human hands while others simulate the actions of octopus arms or inchworms. Now, researchers in the University of Georgia College of Engineering have designed a new soft robotic gripper that draws inspiration from an unusual source: pole beans. (2020-12-15)

Resistance training paired with peanut protein affects muscle health in older adults
Researchers from Auburn University have found that when combined with resistance training, defatted peanut powder can be an effective plant-based protein option for positively affecting select markers of muscle growth and strength in untrained older adults. (2020-12-15)

An avocado a day keeps your gut microbes happy
Eating avocado as part of your daily diet can help improve gut health, a new study from University of Illinois shows. Avocados are a healthy food that is high in dietary fiber and monounsaturated fat. However, it was not clear how avocados impact the microbes in the gastrointestinal system or 'gut.' (2020-12-15)

Muscle cell secrets
A muscle fiber consists of just one cell, but many nuclei. A team at the MDC led by Professor Carmen Birchmeier has now shown just how varied these nuclei are. The study, which has been published in Nature Communications, can help us better understand muscle diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy. (2020-12-11)

Signs of healthy aging found in ergothioneine telomere study
Signs of healthy aging found in ergothioneine telomere in vitro study, published in the Journal of Dietary Supplements, demonstrating Blue California ErgoActive ergothioneine helped to preserve telomere length and reduced the rate of telomere shortening under oxidative stress. The conclusion suggests ergothioneine helps to support healthy aging. (2020-12-10)

Hibiscus reduces the toxicity of ammonia for rainbow trout, say RUDN University biologists
A team of biologists from RUDN University developed a hibiscus-based dietary supplement for trout that makes the fish less sensitive to ammonia pollution and more stress-resistant. (2020-12-07)

Photonics meets surface science in a cheap and accurate sensor for biological liquids
A new, simple, and inexpensive method of testing liquid biological samples that can be further developed to work in clinical settings, including real-time testing during surgery. The team plans to continue their research in increasing specificity as well as the sensitivity of this approach. They are going to file a patent application and look for industrial partners and investors interested in developing clinical devices based on this type of sensors. (2020-12-03)

Can we improve our health with doses of safe, live microbes on a daily basis?
A group of scientists recently published a review paper in The Journal of Nutrition, covering evidence to date on the link between live dietary microbes and human health. (2020-12-03)

Replacing red meat with plant foods may reduce the risk of heart disease
Replacing red meat with high quality plant foods such as beans, nuts, or soy may be associated with a modestly reduced risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), suggests a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-12-02)

Clothing, tattoos could be used to monitor patient health
A shirt that monitors your blood pressure or a pair of socks that can keep track of your cholesterol levels might be just a few years away from becoming reality. In Applied Physics Reviews, researchers examine the use of microfibers and nanofibers as wearable monitors that could keep track of a patient's vital signs. The microfiber- and nanofiber-based technology addresses growing concerns in the medical community about monitoring chronic illnesses as the population ages. (2020-12-01)

New method sees fibers in 3D, uses it to estimate conductivity
Designing a vehicle that can drive away the heat that is generated around it when traveling at hypersonic speeds requires an understanding of the thermal properties of the materials used to construct it. A recent two-part study at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign developed a method to create 3D models of the fibers within composite materials then used that information to predict the thermal conductivity of the material. (2020-12-01)

How does the spider spin its self-assembled silk?
Kyoto University researchers report on a new model for spider silk assembly. The key to spider silk 'spinning' is a combination of acidification and a process known as liquid-liquid phase separation, or LLPS. (2020-11-30)

Nonlinear beam cleaning in spatiotemporally mode-locked lasers
Researchers from École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland (EPFL) recently developed a new approach for generating high-energy, ultrashort pulses with single-mode beam quality: nonlinear beam cleaning in a multimode laser cavity. (2020-11-30)

Patterning method could pave the way for new fiber-based devices, smart textiles
Multimaterial fibers that integrate metal, glass and semiconductors could be useful for applications such as biomedicine, smart textiles and robotics. But because the fibers are composed of the same materials along their lengths, it is difficult to position functional elements, such as electrodes or sensors, at specific locations. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have developed a method to pattern hundreds-of-meters-long multimaterial fibers with embedded functional elements. (2020-11-25)

Eating dried fruit may be linked with better diet quality and health markers
Penn State research found that people who ate dried fruit were generally healthier than those who did not, and on days when people ate dried fruit they consumed greater amounts of some key nutrients than on days when they skipped. However, they also found that people consumed more total calories on days when they ate dried fruit. (2020-11-24)

Sestrin makes fruit flies live longer
Researchers identify positive effector behind reduced food intake. (2020-11-24)

Vegans, vegetarians and pescetarians may be at higher risk of bone fractures
Compared with people who ate meat, vegans with lower calcium and protein intakes on average, had a 43% higher risk of fractures anywhere in the body (total fractures), as well as higher risks of site-specific fractures of the hips, legs and vertebrae, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Medicine. (2020-11-22)

Scientists propose to make a laser scalpel with a 'curved' blade
Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University and Saratov State University teamed up with colleagues from Taiwan and proposed to make a laser 'blade' for a medical scalpel with a specified curved shape using a photonic 'hook'. (2020-11-20)

New fiber optic sensors transmit data up to 100 times faster
Fiber optic sensors - used in critical applications like detecting fires in tunnels, pinpointing leaks in pipelines and predicting landslides - are about to get even faster and more accurate. (2020-11-16)

National supplies of protein, carbs and fats can predict your lifespan
A new global study from the University of Sydney has looked at how macronutrient supplies (proteins, carbohydrates and fats) of different countries are associated with the risk of death at different ages. It is the most extensive analysis to date of corresponding national macronutrient supplies, survival statistics and economic data. (2020-11-16)

Diet affects skin gene expression in both healthy and atopic dogs
Differences in skin gene expression were observed between healthy and atopic Staffordshire Bull Terriers as well as between dogs that ate either dry food or raw food. Raw food appeared to activate the skin's immune system as well as the expression of genes that increase antioxidant production or have anti-inflammatory effects. (2020-11-13)

Gut check: Teff grain boosts stomach microbiome health
Cornell University food scientists confirm that the grain teff helps the stomach and enhances the nutritional value of iron and zinc, according to a new modeling method. (2020-11-13)

Landslide along Alaskan fjord could trigger tsunami
Scientists noted that the slope on Barry Arm fjord on Prince William Sound in southeastern Alaska slid some 120 meters from 2010 to 2017, a slow-moving landslide caused by glacial melt that could trigger a devastating tsunami. These are some of the first measurements to quantify how the slope is falling there; the study also models a potential tsunami. (2020-11-12)

Stretchable fiber optic sensors detect complex deformations simultaneously
A novel dual-core optical fiber made from stretchable materials offers a flexible approach to optomechanical sensing, researchers report. (2020-11-12)

Stretchable 'skin' sensor gives robots human sensation
Cornell University researchers have created a fiber-optic sensor that combines low-cost LEDs and dyes, resulting in a stretchable ''skin'' that detects deformations such as pressure, bending and strain. This sensor could give soft robotic systems - and anyone using augmented reality technology - the ability to feel the same rich, tactile sensations that mammals depend on to navigate the natural world. (2020-11-12)

Graphene controls laser frequency combs in fiber
Tuning laser frequency combs electrically can enrich diversity of comb outputs and help to stabilize them actively. By using a graphene heterogeneous fiber microcavity, researchers recently achieve such electrically tunable laser microcombs in-situ. In this implementation, graphene heterostructure was utilized as saturable absorber, temperature controller and dynamic feedback receiver simultaneously. Hence, rich frequency combs with span over half an octave, repetition 10GHz~80GHz, and phase noise down to -130 dBc/Hz@10kHz are generated. (2020-11-11)

Veganism: Vitamin B12 is well supplemented, iodine is a matter of concern
Those following a vegan diet have an increased risk of iodine deficiency. This is indicated by the results of a research project from the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). In the 'Risks and benefits of a vegan diet' (RBVD) study project, a BfR research team investigated the nutrient supply in 36 people following a vegan diet and 36 people with a mixed diet. (2020-11-10)

Dietary overlap of birds, bats and dragonflies disadvantageous in insect decline
According to a new Finnish study, different groups of insectivores compete for the same type of food. Researchers of the University of Turku, Finland, and the Finnish Museum of Natural History made a discovery by comparing birds, bats and dragonflies that forage in the same area in Southwest Finland. These very distantly related predators consumed the same insect groups. The results shed new light on the decline in insect populations. (2020-11-10)

Unhealthy dietary habits are associated with the risk of proteinuria onset
Researchers from Kanazawa University found out that unhealthy dietary habits as a risk factor for proteinuria onset which is a key prognostic factor of chronic kidney disease (CKD). By investigating over 26,000 patients with no prior CKD who underwent annual medical check-ups in Kanazawa between 1998 and 2014, skipping breakfast and late dinner were associated with proteinuria onset. These findings suggest that modification of dietary habits may be a potential treatment for CKD. (2020-11-09)

Diet and lifestyle during pregnancy linked to modifications in infants' DNA
A new study has shown pregnant women with obesity could reduce the health risks for their infants through improved diet and more physical activity. (2020-11-06)

Utilizing a 'krafty' waste product: Toward enhancing vehicle fuel economy
Researchers from Kanazawa University have chemically modified Kraft lignin -- ordinarily considered in the paper industry to be a waste product -- and used it to produce quality carbon fiber. When optimized in the future as an automotive structural material, it may reduce the fuel needed to power your car. (2020-11-05)

Physical activity and dietary counselling slows down development of insulin resistance in children
A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that individualised and family-based physical activity and dietary counselling considerably slows down the development of insulin resistance, which is a precursor of type 2 diabetes, in 6-9-year-old children. (2020-11-05)

Dietary supplement may help in the treatment of fatty liver
A recent study by researchers at the University of Jyväskylä was successful in partially preventing fatty liver disease in rats. Rats with fatty liver disease were fed with a dietary supplement that is known to increase the growth of good bacteria in the gut. Simultaneous with the increased abundance of the bacteria, the liver fat content decreased significantly. In addition, preliminary results from a human study seem promising. (2020-11-04)

Avoiding inflammatory foods can lower heart disease, stroke risk
Diets high in red and processed meat, refined grains and sugary beverages, which have been associated with increased inflammation in the body, can increase subsequent risk of heart disease and stroke compared to diets filled with anti-inflammatory foods according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. A separate JACC study assessed the positive effects eating walnuts, an anti-inflammatory food, had on decreasing inflammation and heart disease risk. (2020-11-02)

Eating less suppresses liver cancer due to fatty liver
Liver cancer from too much fat accumulation in the liver has been increasing in many countries including Japan. In order to change this unfortunate state of affairs, it is important to improve the prognosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Fatty liver is often improved through eating less, getting more exercise, and reducing body weight. The research group posed the question, ''Can eating less also suppress liver cancer caused by fatty liver?'' (2020-10-29)

Face mask aims to deactivate virus to protect others
Researchers have developed a face mask with an embedded antiviral layer that sanitizes the wearer's respiratory droplets to make them less infectious to others. (2020-10-29)

Extruded grains may be better for pigs
Extrusion is the norm in the pet and aqua feed industries, yet it remains unusual for swine feed in the United States. But the technology can improve energy and protein digestibility in pigs, according to research from the University of Illinois. (2020-10-23)

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