Current Dimension News and Events

Current Dimension News and Events, Dimension News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 10 | 394 Results
The magic angle of twisted graphene
Trapped tightly between two monolayers of carbon superimposed at a precise angle, electrons interact and can produce superconductivity. This is what UCLouvain's researchers reveal in an article published in Nature. This property allows electric power to circulate without any resistivity, without energy lost, within the nanostructure. (2021-02-23)

Scientists propose a new heavy particle similar to the Higgs boson
Unlike the Higgs boson, discovered at CERN's Large Hadron Collider in 2012 after a 40-year quest, the new particle proposed by these researchers is so heavy that it could not be produced directly even in this collider The University of Granada is among the participants in this major scientific advancement in Theoretical Physics, which could help unravel the mysteries of dark matter (2021-02-23)

Searching for dark matter through the fifth dimension
Theoretical physicists of the PRISMA+ Cluster of Excellence at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz are working on a theory that goes beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. The central element is an extra dimension in spacetime. Until now, the scientists have faced the problem that the predictions of their theory could not be tested experimentally. They have now overcome this problem in a publication in the current issue of the European Physical Journal C. (2021-02-01)

RUDN University linguists conducted comprehensive study of how Russian speakers perceive Greek sound
Linguists from RUDN University found out how Russian speakers differentiate between similar consonants of the Greek language and associate them with Russian sounds. (2021-01-25)

COVID-19 cases, deaths in US increase with higher income inequality
US counties with higher income inequality faced higher rates of COVID-19 infections and deaths in the first 200 days of the pandemic, according to a new study. Counties with higher proportions of Black or Hispanic residents also had higher rates. The findings, published by JAMA Network Open, were based on county-level data for all 50 states and Washington, D.C. The lead author was Tim Liao, a sociology professor at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. (2021-01-25)

Industry collaboration leads to important milestone in the creation of a quantum computer
One of the obstacles for progress in the quest for a working quantum computer has been that the working devices that go into a quantum computer and perform the actual calculations, the qubits, have hitherto been made by universities and in small numbers. But in recent years, a pan-European collaboration, in partnership with French microelectronics leader CEA-Leti, has been exploring everyday transistors--that are present in billions in all our mobile phones--for their use as qubits. (2020-12-28)

New method to label and track nano-particles could improve our understanding of plastic pollution
A ground-breaking method to label and track manufactured nano-plastics could signal a paradigm shift in how we understand and care for environments, finds a new study. (2020-12-08)

Pitt researchers create nanoscale slalom course for electrons
''We already know how to shoot electrons ballistically through one-dimensional nanowires made from these oxide materials,'' explains Levy. ''What is different here is that we have changed the environment for the electrons, forcing them to weave left and right as they travel. This motion changes the properties of the electrons, giving rise to new behavior.'' (2020-11-25)

New analytical model detects mutations in breast cancer
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a computational model which is effective in detecting and identifying genetic mutations in breast tumours. The study, the largest of its kind in the world, includes results from over 3 200 patients with breast cancer. (2020-09-24)

Converting lateral scanning into axial focusing to speed up 3D microscopy
In optical microscopy, high-speed volumetric imaging is limited by either the slow axial scanning rate or aberrations introduced by the z-scanning mechanism. To overcome these limitations, scientists at UT Southwestern have introduced a novel optical design that transforms a lateral-scan motion into a scan in the third dimension. Their microscope realized laser focusing at a rate of 12 kHz and allowed observation of fast dynamics inside cells and the beating heart in Zebrafish embryos. (2020-09-23)

Shining a light on disordered and fractal systems
A research team led by the University of Tsukuba investigated the acoustic properties of disordered lysozyme proteins by using terahertz spectroscopy. They found that the fractal nature of the proteins is responsible for its unusually large vibrations at low frequencies, which may lead to a better theory for disordered materials. (2020-09-14)

Scientists propose nano-confinement strategy to form sub-nanometer reactors
Prof. LIU Jian from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and his collaborators proposed a nano-confinement strategy to host multiple Fe and Cu single atoms inside the extremely narrow yet regular surface cavities of graphitic carbon nitride to form 'sub-nanometer reactors'. (2020-09-04)

The mathematical magic of bending grids
A mathematical discovery opens up new possibilities for architecture and design: For any desired curved surface a flat grid of straight bars can be calculated that can be folded out to the desired curved structure. The result is a stable form that can even carry loads. (2020-08-24)

Nooks, crannies and critters
A team of ecologists and engineers have developed a relatively simple way to standardize how habitat complexity is measured. This new approach allows for insights into how structural changes to land and seascapes will alter ecosystems. (2020-08-24)

Sharing a secret...the quantum way
Researchers at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, have demonstrated a record setting quantum protocol for sharing a secret amongst many parties. (2020-07-31)

Recent advances in 2D, 3D and higher-order topological photonics
A research team from South Korea and the USA has provided a comprehensive review covering the recent progress in topological photonics, a recently emerging branch of photonics. This review introduces the basics of topological band theory and various two-dimensional topological phases, followed by three-dimensional topological phases and approaches to achieve them. Recently emerging fields including topological degeneracies in nonzero dimensions, Maxwellian spin waves, higher-order photonic topological phases, and layer pseudospin are also discussed. (2020-07-27)

Even if you want to, you can't ignore how people look or sound
Your perceptions of someone you just met are influenced in part by what they look like and how they sound. But can you ignore how someone looks or how they sound if you're told it is not relevant? Probably not, at least in most cases, a new study found. (2020-07-22)

Brain builds and uses maps of social networks, physical space, in the same way
Even in these social-distanced days, we keep in our heads a map of our relationships with other people: family, friends, coworkers and how they relate to each other. New research from the Center for Mind and Brain at UC Davis shows that we put together this social map in much the same way that we assemble a map of physical places and things. (2020-07-22)

Synthetic dimensions enable a new way to construct higher-order topological insulators
Higher-order topological insulators (HOTIs) are a new phase of matter predicted in 2017, involving complicated high-dimensional structures which show signature physical effects called ''corner modes.'' Now, scientists have proposed a recipe to construct such HOTIs and observe corner modes for photons in simpler, lower-dimensional structures by harnessing an emerging concept called ''synthetic dimensions.'' This construction allows flexible tuning of the topological behavior and opens avenues for even more exotic phases of photons in very high dimensions. (2020-07-21)

Topological photonics in fractal lattices
Photonic topological insulators are currently a subject of great interest because of the features: insulating bulk and topological edge states. Now, scientists from Technion in Israel found theoretically that photonic topological insulators can exist in fractal lattices, comprising only edges - with no bulk at all. Their results offer a realizable experimental platform to study topological fractals and provide new directions for exploring topological physics. (2020-07-21)

The nexus between economic inequality and social welfare
A new interpretation of the concept of inequity - in the sense of unequal distributions across individuals, time and states of the world -- and a new, general measure of welfare from a study just published in the Journal of Economic Surveys, with the contribution of the CMCC Foundation. (2020-06-16)

Environmental noise changes evolutionary cooperation between cellular components, model shows
Cells are massive factories, containing a multitude of substations devoted to specific tasks all devoted to keeping the overarching organism alive. Until now, researchers have questioned how such diverse components evolve in tandem -- especially when each component can evolve in a variety of ways. Two researchers based in Tokyo, Japan, have developed a statistical physics model to demonstrate how such evolution is possible. The results were published on May 26 in Physical Review Letters. (2020-06-06)

Extra choline may help pregnant women decrease negative effects of COVID-19 on their newborns
Pregnant women who take extra choline supplements may mitigate the negative impact that viral respiratory infections, including COVID-19, can have on their babies, according to a new study in the Journal of Psychiatric Research. (2020-06-01)

Solution to century-old math problem could predict transmission of infectious diseases
A Bristol academic has achieved a milestone in statistical/mathematical physics by solving a 100-year-old physics problem -- the discrete diffusion equation in finite space. (2020-05-29)

Antiferromagnetic fluoride nanocrystals
Recently, researchers from Peking University, Shenzhen University and National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) report that the altered passivation of specified facets can direct the synthesis of fluoride nanocrystals into dimension-controlled products in a colloidal approach. An anomalous hysteretic behavior together with thermal dependent exchange anisotropy and high field irreversibility are detected, which are ascribed to the coexistence of long-range antiferromagnetic order and surface spin-glass like freezing. (2020-05-12)

Evidence for plate tectonics on earth prior to 3.2 billion years ago
New research indicates that plate tectonics may have been well underway on Earth more than 3.2 billion years ago, adding a new dimension to an ongoing debate about exactly when plate tectonics began influencing the early evolution of the planet. An analysis of lingering magnetism in rocks from the nearly 3.2 billion year-old Honeyeater Basalt of the East Pilbara. (2020-04-22)

Boson particles discovery provides insights for quantum computing
Researchers working on a U.S. Army project discovered a key insight for the development of quantum devices and quantum computers. Scientists found that a class of particles known as bosons can behave as an opposite class of particles called fermions, when forced into a line. (2020-04-14)

Condensed matter: Bethe strings experimentally observed
90 years ago, the physicist Hans Bethe postulated that unusual patterns, so-called Bethe strings, appear in certain magnetic solids. Now an international team has succeeded in experimentally detecting such Bethe strings for the first time. They used neutron scattering experiments at various neutron facilities including the unique high-field magnet of BER II at HZB. The experimental data are in excellent agreement with the theoretical prediction of Bethe and prove once again the power of quantum physics. (2020-04-06)

Does relativity lie at the source of quantum exoticism?
Since its beginnings, quantum mechanics hasn't ceased to amaze us with its peculiarity, so difficult to understand. Why does one particle seem to pass through two slits simultaneously? Why instead of specific predictions can we only talk about evolution of probabilities? According to theorists from universities in Warsaw and Oxford, the most important features of the quantum world may result from the special theory of relativity, which until now seemed to have little to do with quantum mechanics. (2020-04-02)

Physical activity contributes to positive mental well-being in menopausal women
Late menopausal status is associated with an elevated level of depressive symptoms that indicate the negative dimension of mental well-being. However, menopause was not linked to positive dimensions of mental well-being in women aged 47 to 55. The results also suggest that a high level of physical activity was linked to fewer depressive symptoms, higher satisfaction with life and higher positive affectivity in menopausal women. (2020-04-01)

Quantum copycat: Researchers find a new way in which bosons behave like fermions
When a one-dimensional gas of strongly interacting bosons expands, the velocity distribution of the bosons transforms into one that is identical to non-interacting fermions. (2020-03-27)

Shifting dimensions: Exciting excitons in phosphorene
Scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have explored how an excited state of matter -- excitons -- behaves in phosphorene, a two-dimensional material that could be used in LEDs, solar cells, and other optoelectronic devices. The researchers found that they can control whether excitons interact in one or two dimensions within phosphorene, enhancing its prospects as a new material in optoelectronic devices. (2020-03-25)

Manipulating ligands
Chemists at TU Dresden succeeded in fabricating surface-clean noble metal aerogels boosting the electrocatalysis performance by revisiting ligand chemistry. Publication in Angewandte Chemie International Edition. (2020-03-24)

Deciphering disorder
Researchers have combined experimental and theoretical techniques to measure atomic positions of all the atoms in a 2D material and calculate how the arrangement impacts the electronic properties of various regions of the system. (2020-03-11)

Using a cappella to explain speech and music specialization
Speech and music are two fundamentally human activities that are decoded in different brain hemispheres. A new study used a unique approach to reveal why this specialization exists. (2020-02-27)

Telehealth interventions associated with improved obstetric outcomes
Physician-researchers at the George Washington University published a review suggesting that telehealth interventions are associated with improved obstetric outcomes. (2020-02-11)

Deep-sea osmolyte makes biomolecular machines heat-tolerant
Researchers have discovered a method to control biomolecular machines over a wide temperature range using deep-sea osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). This finding could open a new dimension in the application of artificial machines fabricated from biomolecular motors and other proteins. (2020-01-22)

Refining breast cancer classification by multiplexed imaging
An imaging approach developed at UZH enables the study of breast cancer tissue in greater detail. It uses 35 biomarkers to identify the different cell types in breast tumors and its surrounding area compared to the current standard of testing single markers. This increases the precision of tumor analysis and classification - and improves personalized diagnostics for breast cancer patients. (2020-01-20)

Having to defend one's sexuality increases fear of childbirth
In order to help people with fear of childbirth, there must be trust between the patient and the healthcare staff. But for many lesbian and bisexual women and transgender people, this trust never develops. These are the results of a study in the journal Midwifery from researchers at Linköping University. (2019-12-16)

Study pinpoints new drug targets to treat Nipah virus
Nipah virus, which is transmitted to humans from bats and pigs, has a high mortality rate and there are no licensed drugs against it. Now, researchers have used information on the structure of the Nipah virus to identified 150 possible inhibitors of the virus. The results are published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. (2019-12-12)

Page 1 of 10 | 394 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.