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Current Disability News and Events, Disability News Articles.
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Medicinal cannabis may reduce behavioral problems in kids with intellectual disabilities
Cannabidiol, a type of medicinal cannabis, may reduce severe behavioural problems in children and adolescents with an intellectual disability a new study has found. (2020-06-24)

Mutations linked to intellectual disability point to overly active ion channe
Two mutations identified in individuals with developmental and epileptic brain disease can be traced back to the same ion channel. Researchers have now elucidated how both independent mutations affect the channel's function: by making it overly active and highly sensitive to stimulation. (2020-06-18)

Children with developmental disabilities more likely to develop asthma
Children with developmental disabilities or delay are more at risk of developing asthma, according to a new study published in JAMA Network Open led by public health researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) as part of the Center for Pediatric Population Health. (2020-06-16)

73% of LGBTQ youth bullied for reasons beyond their sexual identity
73% of SGM adolescents surveyed reported experiences of bias-based bullying for reasons beyond their sexual or gender identities, such as being bullied because of their body weight (57%), race/ethnicity (30%) and religion (27%). Each type of bullying was positively related to health risk, including depression, sleep problems, stress, and unhealthy weight control behaviors. (2020-06-15)

Experts clarify subtypes of multiple sclerosis to improve care and clinical trials
An international committee has clarified previously published descriptors of courses of MS and disease activity. MS subtypes are consensus definitions rather than pathologically defined phenotypes, and easily misconstrued. The clarification was prompted in part by differences in specified indications for MS therapies recently approved by the FDA and EMA. The goal is to improve care and refine the selection of clinical trial participants so that trial outcomes can better inform clinical care. (2020-06-11)

Keep moving to prevent major mobility disability
According to research, being physically inactive is the strongest risk factor for disability as we age. A team of researchers created a study to examine the effects of performing light physical activity and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity on older adults. The researchers were interested in studying how participating in these different intensities of activity, and whether a person spreads their physical activity throughout the day, affects the chances for developing a major mobility disability. (2020-06-11)

National survey gives insight into college-to-work experiences of recent college graduates
Recent college graduates with disabilities were as likely to be employed as their peers without disabilities with 90 percent of each group holding jobs after college. These findings reflect the pathways that have opened for people with disabilities since the ADA,. The Survey can also guide decision making made more complicated by the COVID economy; for example, encouraging transition-age students with disabilities to pursue higher education is solid advice. (2020-06-03)

Those with IDD more likely to die from COVID-19, study shows
A new study by researchers from Syracuse University and SUNY Upstate Medical University shows that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are more likely to die from COVID-19 than those without IDD. The disparity -- 1,800 more deaths per 100,000 people diagnosed with COVID-19 -- is likely related to a higher prevalence of comorbid diseases among those with IDD, and/or a higher percentage of people with IDD are living in congregate residential settings. (2020-05-28)

No evidence blanket 'do-not-resuscitate' orders for COVID-19 patients are necessary
It's inappropriate to consider blanket do-not-resuscitate orders for COVID-19 patients because adequate data is not yet available on US survival rates for in-hospital resuscitation of COVID-19 patients and data from China may not relate to US patients, according to a new article published today in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal. (2020-05-22)

Healthcare rationing could see 'unlawful deaths' from COVID-19, researchers claim
Current medical guidelines risk unlawful deaths of patients -- with doctors, hospitals, and even the government potentially liable -- if a second peak forces hard choices due to shortages of ventilators and other critical care resources. (2020-05-21)

Blood test may help predict whose MS will get worse
A blood test may help predict which people with multiple sclerosis (MS) will get worse during the following year, according to a study published in the May 20, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-05-20)

Cord blood study provides insights on benefits, limitations for autism treatment
In a recent study, Duke researchers tested whether a single infusion of a unit of a child's own or donor cord blood could improve social communication skills in children between the ages of 2-7 diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. (2020-05-19)

New rare disease with own facial features, cardiac defects and developmental delay
An international multicentre study describes a rare disease characterized by a series of recognizable facial features, cardiac defects and intellectual disability, which they propose to name as TRAF7 syndrome -according to the name of the gen that causes this pathology. (2020-05-19)

COVID-19 crisis triage -- Optimizing health outcomes and disability rights
New England Journal of Medicine article offers policy recommendations for triage protocols that save the most lives and protect core values, such as the equal moral worth of all people. (2020-05-19)

One in ten patients with major vascular event, infection, or cancer will be misdiagnosed
According to a new study published in De Gruyter's open access journal Diagnosis, approximately one in 10 people (9.6%) in the United States with symptoms caused by major vascular events, infections, or cancers will be misdiagnosed. (2020-05-15)

Washington Post's depictions of autism shift from 'cause and cure' to acceptance
The Washington Post's depiction of autism has shifted over the years from a focus on 'cause and cure' toward one of acceptance and accommodation, say the authors of a study that examined 315 articles published from 2007 to 2017. (2020-05-14)

Older, larger companies benefit from not investing in worker safety, study finds
Companies best equipped to provide safe workplaces are the least likely to do so, because they benefit financially from forgoing the cost of enacting workplace safety practices, a recent study found. In some cases, companies with worker injury claims were more than 50% more likely to survive than their safer counterparts. (2020-05-13)

New therapeutic targets for treating memory impairment in Down syndrome
Researchers from Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute studied the neural basis of intellectual disability in mice with Down syndrome and discovered that the neural networks of brain circuits relevant to memory and learning are over-activated and that the connectivity of these circuits is poor. They also identified biomarkers in brain rhythms that can predict memory deficits in the mice which are corrected by chronic treatment with a natural component of green tea, epigallocatechin gallate (2020-05-05)

Natural mood regulation low or even absent in people with depression
Mood varies from hour-to-hour, day-to-day and healthy mood regulation involves choosing activities that help settle one's mood. However, in situations where personal choices of activities are constrained, such as during periods of social isolation and lockdown, this natural mood regulation is impaired which might result in depression. New research, published today in JAMA Psychiatry, from the Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford suggests a new target for treating and reducing depression is supporting natural mood regulation. (2020-04-22)

Blood pressure awareness and control rates in Canadians are slipping alarmingly, particularly among women
In a new study that draws attention to a growing cardiovascular health concern, investigators report that an increasing number of Canadians, particularly women, are unaware that they have high blood pressure, and they are not getting treatment to control their hypertension. The study appears in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology, published by Elsevier. (2020-04-14)

For stroke survivors, light physical activity linked to better daily function
Stroke survivors who engage in a lot of light physical activity -- taking leisurely walks or attending to nonstrenuous household chores, for example -- also report fewer physical limitations than their more sedentary peers, a new study finds. (2020-04-02)

Risk of death from stroke falls by 24%
Thousands more patients each year are surviving strokes, as the risk of death and disability after a stroke fell significantly between 2000 and 2015, according to analysis by Guy's and St Thomas' researchers. (2020-03-30)

Researchers develop language test for people with Fragile X syndrome
Researchers have developed a test to measure the expressive language skills of people with Fragile X syndrome, a genetic disorder that may result in intellectual disability, cognitive impairment and symptoms of autism spectrum disorder. Expressive language refers to the use of words to convey meaning to others. The work was funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, part of the National Institutes of Health. (2020-03-24)

Five language outcome measures evaluated for intellectual disabilities studies
Expressive language sampling yielded five language-related outcome measures that may be useful for treatment studies in intellectual disabilities, especially fragile X syndrome. The measures were generally valid and reliable across the range of ages, IQs and autism symptom severity of participants. According to the study, led by UC Davis researchers and funded by NIH, the measures are also functional in supporting treatments that can improve language, providing far reaching benefits for individuals with intellectual disabilities. (2020-03-23)

Poor physical health a barrier for job seekers with serious mental illness
People with serious mental illness believe their physical health problems rather than psychological health make it difficult for them to find jobs, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-03-12)

Self-help groups empower caregivers of children with disabilities
Caregivers in low-income settings will be able to respond to the challenges of bringing up children with disabilities, thanks to a new model created by the University of East Anglia (UEA) and the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI). (2020-03-10)

Experts call for more support for parents of children with genetic learning disabilities
Parents of children with genetic conditions that cause learning disabilities are at risk of mental health problems, suggests new research published today in the British Journal of Psychiatry. The teams behind the study have called for greater support for parents whose child receives a genetic diagnosis for their learning disability. (2020-03-10)

Studies show number of US medical students with disabilities grows, but disparities continue
Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that the number of disabled students admitted to US medical schools rose from 2.9% to 4.9% over the last three years. However, the percentage of NIH-funded researchers with disabilities declined between 2008 and 2018. The grant success rate for this group was lower than for researchers without a disability, indicating that despite more people with disabilities prepared to enter biomedical research, their prospects as professionals are weakening. (2020-03-04)

Unintended pregnancy rates higher among women with disabilities, study says
Pregnancies among women with disabilities are 42% more likely to be unintended than pregnancies among women without disabilities, says a new report published in the journal Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health. (2020-02-28)

Multi-sensor band quickly and simply records subtle changes in patients with MS
An international team of scientists, led by UC San Diego researchers, has developed a new, multi-sensor tool that measures subtle changes in multiple sclerosis patients, allowing physicians to more frequently and more quickly respond to changes in symptoms or patient condition. (2020-02-26)

Validating Toolbox to evaluate cognitive processing in people with intellectual disability
Researchers at the UC Davis MIND Institute have updated and validated a series of tests in the NIH Toolbox Cognitive Battery. These tests, delivered on an iPad, can now be used to accurately assess cognitive processing in people with intellectual disability. (2020-02-24)

New study shows vision rehab treatment effective for stroke and injury related blindness
Jose Romano, Chief of the Stroke Division at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, co-authored a recently published international study that shows that visual rehabilitation is effective for patients who have suffered vision loss related to stroke or traumatic brain injury. The study titled 'Efficacy and predictors of Recovery of Function After Eye Movement Training in 296 Hemianopic Patients,' was recently published in the journal Cortex. It is the largest neuro-visual study of its kind. (2020-02-24)

Many older adults face new disabilities after hospital stays for serious illnesses
Older adults often face new disabilities after a hospital stay for a serious illness. Among the problems they may need to adjust to are difficulties with bathing and dressing, shopping and preparing meals, and getting around inside and outside the home. These new disabilities can lead to being hospitalized again, being placed in a nursing home, and more permanent declines in well-being. The longer a serious disability lasts, the worse it can be for an older adult. (2020-02-24)

Researchers adapt cognitive assessment for people with intellectual disability
The NIH Toolbox Cognitive Battery -- an assessment of cognitive functioning for adults and children participating in neuroscience research -- can be adapted to people with intellectual disabilities by modifying some test components and making accommodations for the test-takers' disabilities, according to researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health. (2020-02-24)

Fast treatment via mobile stroke unit reduced survivor disability
Stroke patients were more likely to get clot-busting treatment and received it faster if treatment started in a mobile stroke unit, an ambulance specially equipped to provide treatment. Those treated in a mobile stroke unit had less post-stroke disability, a German study found. (2020-02-20)

Boys with inattention-hyperactivity face increased risk for traumatic brain injuries
McGill-led research shows that boys exhibiting inattention-hyperactivity at age 10 have a higher risk for traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) in adolescence and adulthood. Treatments to reduce these behaviours may decrease the risk for TBIs. (2020-02-19)

Rise in global deaths and disability due to lung diseases over past three decades
There has been an increase in deaths and disability due to chronic respiratory (lung) diseases over the past three decades, finds an analysis of data from 195 countries published by The BMJ today. (2020-02-19)

Optimism reduces stroke severity, inflammation
Optimistic stroke survivors had lower inflammation levels, reduced stroke severity and less initial physical disability after three months compared to less optimistic survivors, according to the findings of a small study. Previous studies have associated optimism with improved health outcomes for other medical conditions, however, no studies previously assessed if this association exists among stroke patient. (2020-02-12)

Developing seizures after stroke may increase risk of death, disability
Developing seizures after severe stroke was linked to higher risk of death or disability. Brain injury caused by severe stroke, recurrent stroke or stroke at a younger age are linked with seizures after stroke. (2020-02-12)

Supervisors share effective ways to include people with disabilities in the workplace
Among the 201 7 survey's findings were processes that were effective, but underutilized by organizations, according to Dr. Phillips. ''For example, partnering with a disability organization was identified as a highly effective way to identify qualified candidates. However, only 28.5% of organizations had implemented this. Interestingly, 75% of supervisors said this would be feasible to implement.'' Other effective, but underutilized practices were auditing of hiring practices, supervisor training in accessible application and interview methods, job shadowing, onsite training, and job sharing. (2020-02-07)

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