Current Discrimination News and Events | Page 2

Current Discrimination News and Events, Discrimination News Articles.
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Magnitude comparison distinguishes small earthquakes from explosions in US west
By comparing two magnitude measurements for seismic events recorded locally, researchers can tell whether the event was a small earthquake or a single-fire buried chemical explosion. (2020-10-13)

Transgender people who experience discrimination likelier to have poor mental health
A University of Waikato study has found that transgender people who have experienced stigma, including harassment, violence, and discrimination because of their identity are much more likely to have poor mental health outcomes. (2020-10-11)

Discrimination contributes to poorer heart health for LGBTQ adults
The majority of LGBTQ adults report experiencing discrimination from a health care professional. Compared to cisgender heterosexual adults, LGBTQ populations experience multi-level, psychological and social stressors, including exposure to discrimination and violence, yet data on how these stressors affect their cardiovascular health is limited. Policy changes within health care education and clinical settings are needed to improve LGBTQ cardiovascular health. (2020-10-08)

Study looks at encoding the odor of cigarette smoke
A recent publication in the Journal of Neuroscience by a group of researchers at the University of Kentucky looks at Encoding the Odor of Cigarette Smoke. Tim McClintock, a physiology professor at UK, says their work lays a foundation for two things. (2020-09-30)

LBG individuals use stimulants at higher rates than heterosexuals
Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) individuals report higher rates of medical, non-medical, and illegal stimulant use compared to heterosexuals, mirroring patterns seen in other substance use. The study by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health researchers provides the most detailed picture to date on stimulant use by LGB subgroups and gender. Findings are published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. (2020-09-24)

During pandemic, racism puts additional stress on Asian Americans
People of Asian ancestry face yet another set of challenges posed by racism and xenophobia which has soared during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-09-24)

Poll: Americans' views of systemic racism divided by race
In the wake of outrage across the nation and racial justice protests spurred by the deaths and injuries of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Jacob Blake and other Black Americans, more than half of Americans believe policing in the country is not fair, according to a new national poll released today by the UMass Lowell Center for Public Opinion. (2020-09-23)

Muslims, atheists more likely to face religious discrimination in US
A new study led by the University of Washington found that Muslims and atheists in the United States are more likely than those of Christian faiths to experience religious discrimination. Researchers focused on public schools and tested how principals responded to an individual's expression of religious belief. (2020-09-22)

Medical mistrust grounded in structural and systemic racism affects HIV care for Black women in the US South
For Black women in the southern United States, mistrust of the health care system that is grounded in structural and systemic racism is a key factor affecting participation in HIV prevention and treatment services, reports a study in the September/October issue of the Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (JANAC). The official journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, JANAC is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-09-17)

Star-cells "shine" to make sense of touch
The IBS research group reports a rather surprise finding as to how GABA works to control the tactile sense. GABA, known for its inhibitory function, actually enhances the sensory input processing by accelerating the signal processing and sharpening the sensitivity of signal magnitude. (2020-09-08)

State laws key to HIV prevention efforts
HIV prevention remains a public health priority in the United States. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a drug regimen recommended for individuals who have engaged in behaviors that place them at elevated risk for HIV. When used consistently, daily oral PrEP has been shown to reduce HIV transmission by 99 percent. However, despite increases in PrEP awareness and uptake over the past several years, data show that four of five people who could benefit from PrEP did not access the medication in 2018. (2020-09-08)

Warning: Epidemics are often followed by unrest
History teaches that social tension accumulated over an epidemic can lead to significant episodes of rebellion, according to a study. (2020-09-07)

Bus drivers more likely to let white customers ride for free
A new paper in The Economic Journal finds that bus drivers are more likely to let white riders ride for free and less likely to let Black riders ride without paying the fee. (2020-09-02)

Having a doctor who shares the same race may ease patient's angst
When doctors are the same race as their patients, it can sometimes forge a sense of comfort that helps to reduce anxiety and pain, particularly for Black patients, new research from the University of Miami suggests. (2020-08-24)

Research challenges popular belief that 'unbridled ambition' costs female candidates votes
A new study into voter behaviour in the US and UK argues that electorates value aspiration and ambition among female candidates seeking office challenging common assumptions. (2020-08-19)

Young gay men's health care needs not being met
Young gay men who are uncomfortable discussing sexual issues with their primary care providers and experience health care discrimination are less likely to seek coordinated care, leading to missed opportunities for early diagnosis of chronic and mental health issues, according to Rutgers researchers. (2020-08-19)

Increasing graduation rates of students of color with more faculty of color
A new analysis published in Public Administration found that student graduation rates improve as more faculty employed by a college or university share sex and race/ethnic identities with students. (2020-08-19)

Employers reject transgender people
Employers in Sweden more often reject job applications from transgender people -- especially in male-dominated occupations. Moreover, transgender people face discrimination from two different grounds for discrimination. This is according to a study from Linköping University that was recently published in the journal Labour Economics. (2020-08-13)

Research suggests bias against natural hair limits job opportunities for black women
New research suggests Black women with natural hairstyles, such as curly afros, braids or twists, are often perceived as less professional than Black women with straightened hair. (2020-08-12)

Racial discrimination linked to suicide
New research findings from the University of Houston indicate that racial discrimination is so painful that it is linked to the ability to die by suicide, a presumed prerequisite for being able to take one's own life, and certain mental health tools - like reframing an incident - can help. (2020-08-03)

Anti-Asian racism during COVID-19 has historical ties in United States
Anti-Asian hate crimes during health crises are unfortunately not new, according to a new academic paper examining the history of this phenomenon. The research team, including an Iowa State University criminal justice researcher, looked at how anti-Asian hate crimes during the COVID-19 pandemic have furthered the historical 'othering' of Asian Americans and reproduced inequalities. (2020-07-29)

Supportive communities and progressive politics can reduce suicide risk among LGBTQ girls
Many LGBTQ youth continue to experience stigma and discrimination despite Canada's progress in protecting human rights. New research from UBC's school of nursing shows that supportive communities--and a progressive political climate--can help mitigate the effects of stigma on mental health. (2020-07-28)

A new approach to aiding black male trauma survivors
Many Black men suffer symptoms of traumatic stress in the aftermath of traumatic injury, and they also often carry social concerns, including experiences of discrimination and stigma. Yet despite their significant needs, underserved populations often have limited access to behavioral health care as well as a lack of financial resources to pay for such care. Because of these barriers, many trauma survivors do not seek professional behavioral health care and instead rely on informal or alternative sources of care. (2020-07-23)

Perceived "whiteness" of Middle Eastern Americans correlates with discrimination
The perceived ''whiteness'' of Americans of Middle Eastern and North African descent is indirectly tied to discrimination against them, and may feed a ''negative cycle'' in which public awareness of discrimination leads to more discrimination, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2020-07-22)

Lifetime discrimination and greater risk of high blood pressure in African Americans
Experiences of discrimination over a lifetime is associated with high blood pressure in African American adults, according to findings published this month in the journal Hypertension from researchers at the Urban Health Collaborative at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health. (2020-07-17)

Analysis finds multiple social disadvantages magnify stroke risk
Living with multiple social disadvantages, including low education, low annual household income, social isolation, living in a neighborhood with high poverty or with poor public health infrastructure, lack of health insurance or being Black, collectively increases the risk of stroke. Younger individuals with multiple social disadvantages, such as Black women living in impoverished neighborhoods in the Southeast United States with inadequate access to healthcare, may be excellent candidates for focused, early interventions to help reduce strokes. (2020-07-16)

Patients with substance use disorder discriminated against by post-acute care facilities
A new study shows that 29 percent of private post-acute care facilities in Massachusetts explicitly discriminated against hospitalized individuals with opioid use disorder, rejecting their referral for admission. Led by researchers at Boston Medical Center's (BMC's) Grayken Center for Addiction, the study showed that 15 percent of the rejections among patients with substance use disorders were denied due to a substance use disorder diagnosis or because they were being treated for opioid use disorder with buprenorphine or methadone. (2020-07-16)

International conference on social determinants of health identified change needs
In November 2019, clinicians, health administrators, educators and researchers from around the world gathered in Toronto to discuss how to best address social determinants of health from a primary care perspective. (2020-07-14)

LGBT-friendly medical practices improve STD/HIV screening rates for vulnerable populations
This report--describing the first national quality improvement collaborative focused on providing culturally affirming care for LGBT people--finds that making primary care practices more LGBT-friendly and inclusive may improve STD and HIV screening rates among this vulnerable population. (2020-07-14)

Most 50+ adults say they've experienced ageism; most still hold positive aging attitudes
Everyday ageism is common in the lives of Americans over 50, a new poll finds, with more than 80% saying they often experience at least one form of ageism in their day-to-day lives. But the poll also suggests that most older adults hold positive attitudes toward aging; two-thirds said life over 50 is better than they thought it would be. (2020-07-13)

COVID-related discrimination disproportionately impacts racial minorities, study shows
USC Dornsife's ''Understanding Coronavirus in America'' tracking survey reveals that discrimination against people who are perceived to have COVID-19, regardless of their true infection status, increased from March to April 2020. (2020-07-07)

Study: Troubling connection between workplace pregnancy discrimination and health of mothers, babies
Perceived pregnancy discrimination indirectly relates to increased levels of postpartum depressive symptoms for mothers and lower birth weights, lower gestational ages and increased numbers of doctor visits for babies, according to a management study led by Baylor University. (2020-07-07)

How prison and police discrimination affect black sexual minority men's health
Incarceration and police discrimination may contribute to HIV, depression and anxiety among Black gay, bisexual and other sexual minority men, according to a Rutgers led study. (2020-07-02)

Lifetime discrimination may increase risk of hypertension among African Americans
A study of African Americans in Mississippi shows an association between experiencing discrimination over a lifetime and developing hypertension (also referred to as high blood pressure). African Americans who reported medium and high levels of lifetime discrimination, compared to those who reported low lifetime discrimination, had a higher risk for hypertension. (2020-07-01)

Showing pro-diversity feelings are the norm makes individuals more tolerant
Showing people how their peers feel about diversity in their community can make their actions more inclusive, make members of marginalized groups feel more like they belong, and even help close racial achievement gaps in education, according to a new study. (2020-07-01)

From age 8 we spontaneously link vocal to facial emotion
Do children have to wait until age 8 to recognize -- spontaneously and without instructions -- the same emotion of happiness or anger depending on whether it is expressed by a voice or on a face? Scientists from the University of Geneva and the Swiss Centre for Affective Sciences have compared the ability of children and adults to make a spontaneous link between a heard voice and the corresponding emotional expression on a natural or virtual. (2020-06-30)

Sexist views on education within families affect future academic choices
The lockdown measures introduced to prevent the spread of the coronavirus have led to classrooms being closed. In certain households, this may result in young people being more influenced by scenarios with a prevalence of sexism -- gender-based discrimination. This is particularly relevant in the case of those students having to make decisions this year, regarding their choice of training module or university degree subject. A study has analysed academic sexism in baccalaureate programmes at schools. (2020-06-26)

Automated stage discrimination of Parkinson's Disease -- BIO Integration
Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this research article the authors Vered Aharonson, Nabeel Seedat, Simon Israeli-Korn, Sharon Hassin-Baer, Michiel Postema and Gilad Yahalom from the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, Tel Aviv Academic College of Engineering, Tel Aviv, Israel, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel and Tel Aviv University, Israel consider automated stage discrimination of Parkinson's Disease. (2020-06-26)

Gender bias kept alive by people who think it's dead
Workplace gender bias is being kept alive by people who think it's no longer an issue, new research suggests. (2020-06-26)

Researchers study myxobacteria's ability to distinguish self from non-self
The new research addresses the mechanism of how myxobacteria discriminate and how highly related strains recently diverged, or evolved, into distinct social groups. (2020-06-22)

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