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Current Discrimination News and Events, Discrimination News Articles.
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Racial discrimination linked to suicidal thoughts in African American men
Suicide deaths among African American men have risen dramatically during the last 20 years, and racial discrimination may be a contributing factor in many cases, say University of Michigan researchers. (2019-10-30)
Report outlines social determinants' role in cancer and public health
A new report outlines the critical role social determinants play in shaping population health, highlighting that health disparities are systemic, and cut across multiple population characteristics, including race/ethnicity, age, disability status, sexual orientation or gender identity, or other characteristics historically linked to discrimination or exclusion. (2019-10-29)
When money is scarce, biased behavior happens faster
Discrimination may happen faster than the blink of an eye, especially during periods of economic scarcity, according to a new study from Cornell University. (2019-10-29)
Women surgical residents suffer more mistreatment, burnout, suicidal thoughts
Women surgical residents suffer more mistreatment than men, which leads to a higher burnout rate and more suicidal thoughts among female residents, reports a new study that surveyed trainees in all accredited 260 US general surgical residency programs. (2019-10-28)
Central Valley workplaces can be hostile for minority doctors
Despite the dire need for primary health care providers in California's Central Valley, workplace discrimination and harassment can cause them to change practices or leave the region entirely. (2019-10-23)
Study identifies religious bias against refugees
When you hold constant national origin, religion is the most powerful source of discrimination against refugees to the United States -- mattering more than gender, age, fluency in English or professional skill. (2019-10-10)
The Lancet: Evidence of mistreatment of women during childbirth in four low-income countries
Physical and verbal abuse during childbirth peaked between 30 minutes before birth until 15 minutes after birth, and mistreatment was more common in younger, less educated women, according to a study in The Lancet which combined observations of 2,016 women during labour and childbirth with surveys of 2,672 women post-childbirth in Ghana, Guinea, Myanmar, and Nigeria. (2019-10-08)
North American seismic networks can contribute to nuclear security
In a paper published as part of an upcoming focus section on regional seismic networks in Seismological Research Letters, University of Utah seismologist Keith Koper explains how the work of regional seismic networks in North America is contributing to nuclear test monitoring, particularly in the case of low-yield explosions. (2019-10-02)
Geriatrics experts on gender equity in health care: 'When women rise, we all rise'
Putting power and potential behind gender equity in health care isn't just common sense. (2019-10-01)
Mob mentality rules jackdaw flocks
Jackdaws are more likely to join a mob to drive off predators if lots of their fellow birds are up for the fight, new research shows. (2019-10-01)
Does being a 'superwoman' protect African American women's health?
A new study by University of California, Berkeley, researchers explores whether different facets of being a strong black woman, which researchers sometimes refer to as 'superwoman schema,' ultimately protect women from the negative health impacts of racial discrimination -- or cause more harm. (2019-09-30)
Georgia State research finds early life racial discrimination linked to depression, accelerated aging
Early life stress from racial discrimination puts African Americans at greater risk for accelerated aging, a marker for premature development of serious health problems and perhaps a shorter life expectancy, according to a study led by a Georgia State University psychology researcher. (2019-09-30)
Fathers may protect their LGB kids from health effects of discrimination
Lesbian, gay, and bisexual individuals who report being discriminated against but who feel close to their fathers have lower levels of C-reactive protein -- a measure of inflammation and cardiovascular risk -- than those without support from their fathers, finds a new study from researchers at NYU College of Global Public Health. (2019-09-18)
Experience of being a minority puts US teens at higher risk of anxiety, depression
Puerto Rican teens growing up as minorities in the South Bronx are more likely to experience anxiety and depression than their peers growing up as a majority in Puerto Rico, even under similar conditions of poverty. (2019-09-09)
Fix and prevent health disparities in children by supporting mom, and dad
According to the recent National Academies report on health disparities in children, one of the most important factors in preventing and addressing disparities is the well-being of the child's primary caregiver. (2019-09-05)
Giving people a 'digital identity' could leave them vulnerable to discrimination, experts warn
Global efforts to give millions of people missing key paper documents such as a birth certificates a digital identity could leave them vulnerable to persecution or discrimination, a new study warns. (2019-08-30)
Even scientists have gender stereotypes ... which can hamper the career of women researchers
However convinced we may be that science is not just for men, the concept of science remains much more strongly associated with masculinity than with femininity in people's minds. (2019-08-26)
Transgender college students four times as likely to experience mental health problems
In the largest mental health survey of gender minority college students, BU researchers Sarah Lipson and Julia Raifman find that transgender, gender-nonconforming, genderqueer, and nonbinary college students face enormous mental health disparities. (2019-08-16)
Neuroscientists make major breakthrough in 200-year-old puzzle
Weber's law is the most firmly established rule of psychophysics -- the science that relates the strength of physical stimuli to the sensations of the mind. (2019-08-12)
'Extensive gender discrimination in healthcare access' for women in India, suggests study
Women in India face 'extensive gender discrimination' in access to healthcare, suggests a study of outpatient appointments at one major tertiary care hospital in Delhi, and published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2019-08-07)
Canada's new dementia strategy needs commitment to be successful
Canada's new national dementia strategy can be successful with sustained political will, adequate funding, measurable targets and a commitment from all Canadians to achieve its goals, argues an editorial in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.190929. (2019-08-06)
Many North American indigenous youth experience symptoms of depression during adolescence
A new study that analyzed data on the development of depressive symptoms among Indigenous youth in the United States and Canada found that many of the youth had experienced these symptoms during adolescence. (2019-07-31)
Uncovering the roots of discrimination toward immigrants
Immigrants are often encouraged to assimilate into their new culture as a way of reducing conflict with their host societies, to appear less threatening to the culture and national identity of the host population. (2019-07-29)
Mediterranean diet during pregnancy associated with improved maternal health outcomes
A new clinical trial found women who followed a Mediterranean-style diet during pregnancy, including a daily portion of tree nuts (half being walnuts) and extra virgin olive oil, had a 35 percent lower risk of gestational diabetes and on average, gained 2.75 pounds less, compared to women who received standard prenatal care. (2019-07-24)
How mammals' brains evolved to distinguish odors is nothing to sniff at
Neuroscientists from the Salk Institute and UC San Diego have discovered that at least six types of mammals--from mice to cats--distinguish odors in roughly the same way, using circuitry in the brain that's evolutionarily preserved across species. (2019-07-18)
Homeless people are denied basic health care, research finds
A study led by the University of Birmingham, UK, has painted a shaming picture of neglect and discrimination shown towards the homeless when accessing UK health services. (2019-07-15)
Using artificial intelligence to detect discrimination
A new artificial intelligence (AI) tool for detecting unfair discrimination -- such as on the basis of race or gender -- has been created by researchers at Penn State and Columbia University. (2019-07-10)
Research questions link between unconscious bias and behavior
Implicit bias, a term for automatically activated mental associations, is often seen as a primary cause of discrimination against social groups such as women and racial minorities. (2019-07-01)
LGBTQ Asian-Americans seen as more 'American'
For Asian-Americans who are gay or lesbian, their sexual orientation may make them seem more 'American' than those who are presumed straight. (2019-06-27)
Seizures in Alzheimer's mouse model disrupt adult neurogenesis
Working with animal models of Alzheimer's disease, a team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine discovered that seizures that are associated with the disease both in animal models and humans alter the normal dynamics of neurogenesis in adult brains. (2019-06-25)
Hate speech on Twitter predicts frequency of real-life hate crimes
According to a first-of-its-kind study, cities with a higher incidence of a certain kind of racist tweets reported more actual hate crimes related to race, ethnicity, and national origin. (2019-06-24)
Ageism reduced by education, intergenerational contact
Researchers at Cornell University have shown for the first time that it is possible to reduce ageist attitudes, prejudices and stereotypes through education and intergenerational contact. (2019-06-21)
Latest artificial intelligence research from China in Big Data
China is among the leaders in the rapidly advancing artificial intelligence field, and its broad range of cutting-edge research expertise is on display in this special issue on 'Artificial Intelligence in China' of Big Data. (2019-06-18)
LGBTQ awareness lacking among American neurologists, new survey finds
A first-of-its-kind survey of American neurologists reveals that more than half carry the mistaken belief that a patient's sexual orientation and gender identity have no bearing on treatment of neurologic illness. (2019-06-17)
Evidence of hiring discrimination against nonwhite groups in 9 countries examined
A new meta-analysis on hiring discrimination by Northwestern University sociologist Lincoln Quillian and his colleagues finds evidence of pervasive hiring discrimination against all nonwhite groups in all nine countries they examined. (2019-06-17)
Supportive families and schools help prevent substance use among trans youth: UBC study
Strong family and school connections are helping prevent transgender youth from smoking cigarettes and using marijuana, even among those targeted by violence. (2019-06-10)
Sellers on classified ad websites favor buyers from affluent neighborhoods
New Rice University research has found that people selling stuff on classified ad websites prefer dealing with buyers from affluent neighborhoods. (2019-06-10)
Only 2% of black Chicagoan' allegations of police misconduct were sustained
Between 2011 and 2014, just 2% of allegations made by black Chicagoans resulted in a recommendation for sanction against an officer, compared to 20% for white complainants, and 7% for Latino complainants. (2019-06-06)
Racism has a toxic effect
Researchers have long known that racism is linked to health problems, but now results from a small study using RNA tests show that racism appears to increase chronic inflammation among African Americans. (2019-05-31)
Perceived discrimination associated with well-being in adults with poor vision
This study of nearly 7,700 men and women 50 or older in England looked at how common perceived discrimination was among those with visual impairment and how that was associated with emotional well-being. (2019-05-30)
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