Current Disease Control News and Events

Current Disease Control News and Events, Disease Control News Articles.
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Early functional SARS-COV-2 specific T cell response may prevent severe infection
Antibodies and T cells are components of the human immune system that directly act against viral infections and eliminate infected cells. A new study by scientists from Duke-NUS Medical School, provides evidence that an early presence of SARS-CoV-2 specific T cells in COVID-19 is likely to prevent severe disease. The study, published in Cell Reports, has important implications for the clinical management of COVID-19 patients. (2021-02-01)

An integrated approach for an effective prevention of Alzheimer´s disease
Recent studies demonstrate that styles of life involving interdependent actions of exercise, oriental practices such as QiGong, nutrition, mental and social activity and mindfulness are effective in preventing Alzheimer´s disease and other forms of dementia (2021-02-01)

Using VR training to boost our sense of agency and improve motor control
Patients with motor dysfunctions are on the rise across Japan as its population continues to age. A Tohoku University researcher has developed a new method of rehabilitation using virtual reality to increase the sense of agency over our body and aid motor skills. (2021-01-20)

Guppies have varying levels of self-control
Just like humans trying to stick to New Year's resolutions, guppies have varying levels of self-control, a new study shows. (2021-01-15)

Biological control agents can protect soybeans from Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS)
Recently, Mirian Pimentel, a PhD student, and a group of plant pathologists at Southern Illinois University, discovered a promising new tool to fight sudden death syndrome (SDS). They observed that several biological control agents (BCA), or beneficial fungi, were able to substantially reduce the growth of the causal pathogen agent of SDS. In some cases, these agents even overgrew the pathogen, parasitized it, and displayed evidence of ''feeding'' on it. (2020-09-02)

Weather-based decisions may reduce fungicide sprays on table beets
Use of a weather-based decision support system to schedule fungicides for the control of CLS in table beet reduces unnecessary expense to the grower and unnecessary exposure of a fungal population to single-site modes of action posing a high risk of resistance development. For more information, read 'Optimizing Cercospora Leaf Spot Control in Table Beet Using Action Thresholds and Disease Forecasting' in Plant Disease. (2020-07-21)

Stretching your legs may help prevent diseases such as heart diseases and diabetes
New research published today in The Journal of Physiology shows that 12 weeks of easy-to-administer passive stretching helps improve blood flow by making it easier for your arteries to dilate and decreasing their stiffness. (2020-07-02)

Need to control blood sugar? There's a drink for that, says UBC prof
With more people with diabetes and pre-diabetes looking for novel strategies to help control blood sugar, new research from UBC's Okanagan campus suggests that ketone monoester drinks--a popular new food supplement--may help do exactly that. (2020-01-07)

Childhood chores not related to self-control development
A University of Houston psychologist is reporting that although assigning household chores is considered an essential component of child-rearing, it turns out they might not help improve children's self-control. Assistant professor of psychology, Rodica Damian, also found that self-control predicted better work outcomes in young adulthood. (2019-11-05)

Scientists propose environmentally friendly control practices for harmful tomato disease
Tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD) is the most destructive disease of tomato, causing severe damage to crops worldwide and resulting in high economic losses. To combat this disease, many farmers opt for intensive application of insecticides. However, this practice is frequently ineffective and has a negative impact on the environment and human health. A team of scientists found two environmentally friendly control alternatives. (2019-08-05)

The surprising link between a babies' weeble-wobble and the genetics of motor control
Neuroscientists at the University of Sussex have revealed that complex movements, such as those that maintain our posture, can be controlled by a simple genetic system, providing a framework to better understand the molecular basis of diseases that affect motor control, like Huntington's and Parkinson's. (2019-07-30)

New treatment program offers hope for controlling wombat mange
New research from the University of Tasmania is offering hope that the deadly mange disease affecting Tasmanian wombats could eventually be brought under control for wild individuals and populations. (2019-07-24)

Uterine artery embolization can be considered for well controlled symptomatic leiomyomas
A new study published in the April 2019 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) investigates the safety of uterine artery embolization (UAE) for symptomatic leiomyomas in patients with various autoimmune diseases. (2019-03-29)

For older adults, sense of control tied to feeling younger
A recent study finds that older adults feel younger when they feel that they have more control over their daily lives, regardless of stress or health concerns. However, stress and health -- not a sense of control -- play a significant role in how old younger adults feel. (2019-03-15)

Subsidies for infection control to healthcare institutions help reduce infection levels
Researchers compared three types of infection control subsidies and found that under a limited budget, a dollar-for-dollar matching subsidy, in which policymakers match hospital spending for infection control measures, was the most effective at reducing the number of hospital-acquired infections. (2019-03-12)

Resistance training may help prevent type 2 diabetes
A new study published in Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews points to the benefits of exercise, especially resistance training (RT), for preventing type 2 diabetes. (2019-03-06)

The 'blue' in blueberries can help lower blood pressure
A new study published in the Journal of Gerontology Series A has found that eating 200g of blueberries every day for a month can lead to an improvement in blood vessel function and a decrease in systolic blood pressure in healthy people. (2019-02-20)

Psoriasis linked with need for cardiovascular interventions in patients with hypertension
Psoriasis is linked with increased risks of hypertension and cardiovascular disease, but its effect on the course of cardiovascular disease remains unknown. (2018-10-17)

CDC Guideline on diagnosis, management of mild traumatic brain injury in children
A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention evidence-based guideline on the diagnosis and management of mild traumatic brain injury (concussion) in children is detailed in a special communication article. The guideline includes 19 sets of recommendations on the diagnosis, prognosis, management and treatment of pediatric mild traumatic brain injury, including return to school and symptom management. (2018-09-04)

Towards winning the war on feral wild rabbits
New research shows how two biological control agents have been effective in reducing the numbers of feral rabbits in Australia. Using data from the largest wild rabbit study in the world, scientists have examined the long-term interaction of myxoma and rabbit haemorrhagic disease viruses. (2018-07-10)

Missed opportunities for HIV testing
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends at least annual testing for people at high risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), including men who have sex with men and people who inject drugs. A new study from the CDC estimates substantial numbers of people infected with HIV, but unaware of their infection, weren't offered HIV testing by clinicians they've recently seen. (2018-06-26)

Rewiring plant defence genes to reduce crop waste
Plants could be genetically rewired to better resist disease, helping safeguard crop yields worldwide according to new research by the universities of Warwick and York. Defensive feedback control system developed enables plants to strengthen their defenses to withstand attack by re-wiring existing gene connections The system uses same approach as aircraft autopilots use to counteract turbulence. (2018-06-18)

New methods for genetics analyses and diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease
Inflammatory bowel disease is a common chronic disease of the gut. Approximately one out of 250 Europeans suffer from this disease today. (2018-04-26)

Leadership and adaptive reserve are not associated with blood pressure control
Primary care leadership and practice resilience can strengthen organizational culture. In small primary care practices, however, practice adaptive reserve and leadership capability are not associated with baseline blood pressure control. (2018-04-09)

Are people with Parkinson's disease depressed or demoralized?
People with Parkinson's disease who show signs of depression may actually have a condition called demoralization, according to a study published in the April 4, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. That study found demoralization may be common in Parkinson's disease. (2018-04-04)

Study uncovers the intricacies of the pursuit of higher self-control
Self-control is a central human capacity associated with a wide range of personal and societal advantages. In view of its benefits, increasing self-control among children and adults has been advocated as a remedy to many of society's ailments, from childhood obesity to adulthood criminal behavior. Although widely considered highly beneficial, a recent review uncovers some disadvantages to high self-control. (2018-03-26)

PSU study: Kids from wealthier families feel more control over lives
Sociology professor Dara Shifrer examined which measures of socioeconomic status -- parents' education, family income, race and parents' occupation -- have the greatest influence over a child's locus of control and why (2018-03-22)

Intensive glucose control in type 2 diabetes can have adverse effects
The common approach of intensive glucose control to achieve low blood sugar targets in type 2 diabetes can increase the risk of mortality, finds a study by Cardiff University. (2017-11-15)

Long-term opioid use does not increase risk of Alzheimer's disease
Opioid use is not associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease, shows a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland. A previous study from the US reported an association between high cumulative doses of opioids and an increased risk of dementia, but the Finnish study does not confirm this finding. (2017-10-24)

Chronic wasting disease
Research published in the International Journal of Global Environmental Issues, summarizes the efforts in disease surveillance and risk management of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer and shows that past management strategies such as selective culling, herd reduction, and hunter surveillance have had only limited effectiveness. The summary points towards new advice for optimal, cost-effective strategies in aggressive disease control. (2017-09-26)

Liquid nutrition may benefit children with Crohn's disease
An analysis of published studies indicates that exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) -- when individuals receive only liquid nutrition -- may be an effective treatment for children with Crohn's disease. (2017-08-23)

Antiulcer drugs do not increase risk of Alzheimer's disease
The use of proton pump inhibitors does not increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease, shows a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland. Proton pump inhibitors are a type of antiulcer drug that is commonly used among older persons. (2017-08-07)

Medalist study underlines importance of glucose control in adults with Type 1 diabetes
Findings of the latest study of the Joslin 50-Year Medalists, who have had type 1 diabetes for at least 50 years, re-emphasize the importance of good blood glucose control and exercise in reducing complications and mortality rates for these older individuals. (2017-07-27)

Researchers call for paradigm shift in type 2 diabetes treatment
Results from four recent randomized clinical trials suggest that using medications that offer glucose control while reducing the risk for cardiovascular disease could improve patient outcomes. (2017-06-20)

Wanting more self-control could hinder our efforts to exert self-control, study finds
A new study shows that, ironically, wanting to have more self-control could actually be an obstacle to achieving it. It appears that the mere existence of a desire for self-control undermines one's confidence and brings one to disengage from self-control challenges (regardless of one's actual level of self-control). (2017-04-27)

Feeling out of control: Do consumers make practical purchases or luxury buys?
The common assumption about retail therapy is that it's all about indulging in things like pricey designer duds or the latest gadgets. But according to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are actually more likely to make practical purchases than splurge on luxury items when they feel less in control. (2017-03-22)

Cellular quality control process could be Huntington's disease drug target
The loss of motor function and mental acuity associated with Huntington's disease might be treatable by restoring a cellular quality control process, which Duke Health researchers have identified as a key factor in the degenerative illness. (2017-02-13)

A parallel hybrid controller based on the backstepping method
The semi-pelagic trawl is a relatively advanced trawl system which is mainly adopted to catch demersal fish such as squid and butterfish. Now aiming at improving its security in a complex working environment, this paper proposes a three-dimensional tracking control system for the guidance of a semi-pelagic trawl on a complicated trajectory. A new simplified mass-spring-barmodel is presented and the movement of the trawl system can be described by a group of state space equations. (2016-12-29)

Deadly sleeping sickness set to be eliminated in 6 years
Gambian sleeping sickness -- a deadly parasitic disease spread by tsetse flies -- could be eliminated in six years in key regions in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), according to new research by the University of Warwick. (2016-12-22)

Study links optimal asthma control with reduced health-care costs
In a study of 736 asthma patients in Singapore, good asthma control resulted in a saving of S$65 (US$48) per physician visit. Compared with an average cost of S$214 (US$158) per visit, this reduction represents a cost saving of 30 percent versus suboptimally controlled asthma. (2016-11-10)

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