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Current Disease Therapy News and Events, Disease Therapy News Articles.
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Is proton therapy the silver bullet for children with brain cancer?
How safe is proton therapy for children with brain cancer compared to the conventional x-ray radiation delivered post-surgery? (2020-11-11)

3D printed stents that treat inflammation
POSTECH Professor Dong-Woo Cho's research team develops bioink-loaded esophageal stents for treating radiation esophagitis. (2020-11-10)

Induced liver regeneration enhances CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene repair
Use of thyroid hormone to boost hepatocyte proliferation enhanced the efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene correction in the mouse liver. This dietary induction of hepatocyte regeneration may be a viable clinical strategy to enhance gene repair in the liver. (2020-11-10)

Penn Study supports use of radiation before CAR therapy for multiple myeloma
Administering radiation therapy to multiple myeloma patients waiting for CAR T cells to be manufactured was found to be safe and undisruptive to CAR T therapy. (2020-10-26)

ASTRO: Proton therapy for lung cancer may help reduce risk of heart diseases
Treating lung cancer patients with proton therapy may help reduce the risk of radiation-induced heart diseases. (2020-10-23)

Antiretroviral therapy can't completely stop accelerated cell aging seen in HIV
Untreated HIV infection is linked with epigenetic changes that suggest rapid aging. A new study by UCLA researchers shows that antiretroviral therapy given over two years was unable to completely restore age-appropriate epigenetic patterns, leaving patients more susceptible to aging-related illnesses. (2020-10-22)

Serum creatinine-to- cystatin C ratio predicts mortality
In patients initiating continuous renal replacement therapy for acute kidney injury, higher serum creatinine-to-cystatin C ratios were associated with lower mortality. (2020-10-21)

Anti-inflammatory therapy shows promise in slowing progression of multiple sclerosis
Intranasal administration of an anti-inflammatory drug helped reduce disease progression in a preclinical model of multiple sclerosis, according to recent research out of the University of Alberta. (2020-10-20)

Rutgers finds new way to personalize treatments for prostate cancer
Rutgers researchers have discovered human gene markers that work together to cause metastatic prostate cancer - cancer that spreads beyond the prostate. (2020-10-19)

Less invasive ventilation use grows dramatically, without needed data
Analysis of nearly 2.5 million Medicare-funded hospitalizations near the end of a patient's life found the use of non-invasive ventilation has increased substantially, even though there is little data to support its use in certain patient groups, such as those with cancer and dementia near the end of life. (2020-10-19)

Study identifies gene variants to help personalize treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis
A group of three gene variants, commonly inherited together, may provide clues to more successful treatment of pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), a chronic inflammation of the food pipe often confused with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A new study, led by researchers from Nemours Children's Health System and published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, identifies genetic variants that help predict which children with EoE may not respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medication therapy as a long-term solution. (2020-10-15)

Therapy plus medication better than medication alone in bipolar disorder
A review of 39 randomized clinical trials by scientists from UCLA and their colleagues from other institutions has found that combining the use medication with psychoeducational therapy is more effective at preventing a recurrence of illness in people with bipolar disorder than medication alone. (2020-10-14)

New therapy improves treatment for multiple sclerosis
A new therapy that binds a cytokine to a blood protein shows potential in treating multiple sclerosis, and may even prevent it. (2020-10-12)

More evidence of benefits of REGN-COV2 antibody cocktail to both protect from and treat disease
In June, two studies in Science reported an antibody cocktail against SARS-CoV-2 developed from studies in humanized mice and recovering patients. (2020-10-09)

Treating cystic fibrosis with mRNA therapy or CRISPR
The potential for treating cystic fibrosis (CF) using mRNA therapies or CRISPR gene editing is possible regardless of the causative mutation. CF clinical trials showing that a genotype-agnostic gene therapy for CF is possible (2020-10-08)

Advanced prostate cancer has an unexpected weakness that can be targeted by drugs
Kanazawa University researchers reported that the SUCLA2 gene is frequently involved in the deletion of the tumor suppressor gene RB1 in advanced prostate cancer. RB1 deletion makes cells resistant to hormone therapy but SUCLA2 deletion induces a metabolic weakness. The study showed that thymoquinone selectively killed SUCLA2-deficient prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The findings highlight a vulnerability of advanced prostate cancer cells that can be targeted by drugs. (2020-10-07)

Could arm squeezes with blood pressure cuffs help the brain recover after stroke?
People who are given clot-busting drugs after a stroke may recover better if they also are given a therapy called remote ischemic postconditioning, according to a new study published in the October 7, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Remote ischemic conditioning is when blood flow, and the oxygen it carries, is stopped and then restored repeatedly by blood pressure cuffs worn on the arms. (2020-10-07)

Fostamatinib in chronic immune thrombocytopenia: No comparison -- added benefit not proven
Fostamatinib in chronic immune thrombocytopenia: no comparison -- added benefit not proven The manufacturer conducted no direct or indirect comparison of its drug with an appropriate comparator therapy (eltrombopag or romiplostim). (2020-10-06)

Scientists propose immune cocktail therapy to boost cancer-immunity cycle in multiple aspects
A research team led by Prof. TIAN Huayu from the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry (CIAC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences proposed an innovative immune cocktail therapy that combined ICT along with other therapeutic approaches. The cocktail therapy achieved multiple boosting of the cancer-immunity cycle by utilizing a nano-delivery system. (2020-09-30)

How hormone therapy slows progression of atherosclerosis
As one of the most common treatments for effectively managing menopause symptoms, hormone therapy (HT) is also known to provide multiple health benefits, including slowing the progression of atherosclerosis. A study based on Early Versus Late Intervention Trial With Estradiol (ELITE) data evaluated the underlying mechanism of such benefit and will be presented during the 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), opening on September 28. (2020-09-28)

Cell therapy designed to treat inflammatory bowel disease
The UPV/EHU's NanoBioCel research group has for many years been developing systems enabling cells to be used as drugs. Cell therapy raises hopes for treating those diseases for which there are as yet no effective pharmacological solutions. Biomaterials, a leading journal in the field of materials sciences and medicine, has just published the paper 'Multifunctional biomimetic hydrogel systems to boost the immunomodulatory potential of mesenchymal stromal cells'. (2020-09-28)

Spinal cord stimulation reduces pain and motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease patients
A team of researchers in the United States and Japan reports that spinal cord stimulation (SCS) measurably decreased pain and reduced motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, both as a singular therapy and as a 'salvage therapy' after deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapies were ineffective. (2020-09-28)

Shorter time from symptom onset to hospitalization is associated with worse outcome in patients with COVID-19
New research presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online) shows that a shorter time from symptom onset to hospitalisation is associated with more serious disease and death in patients with COVID-19. The study is by Dr Annie Wong-Beringer and colleagues, University of Southern California (USC) School of Pharmacy, Los Angeles, CA, USA, and presented at ECCVID by co-author Amanda Chron. (2020-09-25)

Scientists identify dozens of genes allowing cancer cells to evade the immune system
Cancer immunotherapy can be extremely successful but so far has only worked in a fraction of patients and tumour types. To make it more widely available, more knowledge is needed about the genes involved in the interaction between cancer and immune cells. In the most comprehensive study to date, Toronto scientists have mapped 182 genes that make cancer cells more susceptible or resistant to T cell killing that could be harnessed to boost immunotherapy success. (2020-09-23)

Gene therapy corrects the cardiac effects of Friedreich's ataxia
Gene therapy was successfully used to overcome the cardiac effects of Freidreich's ataxia (FA) in a mouse model of the disease (2020-09-18)

Biologic therapy for psoriasis may reduce heart disease
Biologic therapy for psoriasis - protein-based infusions to suppress inflammation - was associated with a significant reduction in high-risk plaque in heart arteries, over one-year, according to new research. The positive association between biologic therapy and a decrease in high-risk plaque in heart arteries was significant after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and psoriasis severity. (2020-09-15)

The Josep Carreras Institute identifies a marker of poor evolution in Hodgkin's lymphoma
Dr. Manel Esteller, director of the Josep Carreras Leukemia Research Institute, published today in Blood journal, the discovery of a marker that allows predicting which patient with Hodgkin's lymphoma will present the aggressive clinical course, and will therefore be a case of special risk. (2020-09-15)

Quality over quantity in recovering language after stroke
New Edith Cowan University (ECU) research has found that intensive therapy is not necessarily best when it comes to treating the loss of language and communication in early recovery after a stroke. (2020-09-06)

Ultraviolet B exposure expands proenkephalin+ regulatory T cells with a healing function
Skin exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) induces expansion of regulatory T (Treg) cells with immunosuppressive activity. Here researchers found that UVB-expanded skin Treg (UVB-skin Treg) cells had a tissue repair function. UVB-skin Treg cells expressed proenkephalin (PENK) and amphiregulin (AREG), which promoted keratinocyte outgrowth and skin wound healing. Their results provide a new implication in developing a therapy using UVB-skin Treg cells. (2020-09-01)

Hope for 500 000 insomniacs in Norway
Digital sleep therapy could offer help to people with sleep problems and enable many of them to reduce their sleep medication after treatment. (2020-09-01)

Nanomaterials based strategies for treatment of hypoxic tumor
Hypoxic tumor microenvironment restricts efficiency of tumor therapies and leads to serious results of tumor recurrence and high mortality. Different strategies to treat hypoxic tumors based on nanomaterials have been utilized to eliminate the side effects of hypoxia on tumor therapies. The strategies could be summarized into two classes, i) elevating oxygen level in tumor by nanomaterials and ii) diminishing oxygen dependence of nanomaterials for hypoxic tumor therapy. (2020-08-31)

Black children with cancer three times less likely to receive proton radiotherapy than White children
A retrospective analysis led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital has found racial disparities in the use of the therapy for patients enrolled in trials. (2020-08-27)

Phase 1 human trials suggest UIC-developed breast cancer drug is safe, effective
A new type of breast cancer drug can help halt progression of disease and is not toxic, according to phase 1 clinical trials. (2020-08-27)

New therapy targets breast cancer metastases in brain
When breast cancer spreads to the brain, the prognosis is grim. Patients only have about six months to live. Women with HER2-positive breast cancer tend to develop brain metastases in up to 55% of cases. Chemotherapy drugs targeting breast cancer cells in the brain aren't effective, because they can't cross the blood-brain-barrier. But a new combination therapy targeting breast cancer tumors in the brain dramatically decreased tumor size and increased survival in a preclinical study. (2020-08-26)

Progress toward a treatment for Krabbe disease
The inherited disease, which typically kills children before their second birthday, has no cure, but a University of Pennsylvania study in a canine model offers hope for an effective gene therapy with lasting results. (2020-08-26)

In sickness and in health
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba have shown that for men with major cardiovascular disease risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, their wives are more likely to suffer from the same diseases. These results emphasize the need for extending disease concerns beyond relatives who share ancestry to the patient's spouse. Further, couple-based interventions are desirable for the management of lifestyle diseases, and spouses should be informed of their risk. (2020-08-25)

New blood, new hope: Transfusions protect the brain from stroke damage
In a study led by Xuefang ''Sophie'' Ren, a research assistant professor in the Department of Neuroscience, a team of West Virginia University neuroscientists found that blood substitution therapy rescues the brains of mice from ischemic damage, a potential breakthrough in stroke therapy. (2020-08-25)

A multicenter look at gene therapy for spinal muscular atrophy
A new study confirms the safety and efficacy of gene therapy in children with spinal muscular atrophy under two years old. (2020-08-25)

Biomedical scientists piece together how medication paralyzes parasitic worms
A new study upends the widely held belief that a medication used to treat lymphatic filariasis doesn't directly target the parasites that cause the disease. The research shows the medication, diethylcarbamazine, temporarily paralyzes the parasites. (2020-08-18)

Delaying prostate cancer radiation therapy offers room for flexibility in pandemic peak
A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital found that for men with unfavorable intermediate-risk or high-risk localized prostate cancer, who are receiving radiation and hormone therapy, delaying radiation while remaining on hormone therapy is unlikely to impact survival. (2020-08-13)

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