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Current Disease Management News and Events, Disease Management News Articles.
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Focusing continuity of care on sicker patients can save millions of dollars annually
Research shows higher continuity of care, meaning a care team cooperatively involved in ongoing healthcare, is better for health outcomes, but can there be too much of a good thing? (2020-03-09)
New model improves management of wetland, floodplain and river habitats
Engineers have developed a unique computer model that may help predict strategies that improve the quality and size of aquatic, floodplain and wetland habitats. (2020-03-04)
How pest management strategies affect the bottom line
Concern regarding impacts of pesticides on the environment and human health has led to the development of integrated pest management (IPM) programs. (2020-02-28)
Scientists call on government to increase ambition to save our ocean
A team of marine scientists from across the UK, led by the Marine Conservation Research Group at the University of Plymouth, has called on the Government to increase its ambition to save the oceans by overhauling its approach to marine conservation management. (2020-02-25)
Big ideas in performance management 2.0
Industrial-era performance management paradigms and practices are outdated and ineffective in the modern VUCA work environment. (2020-02-19)
Improving protection of wildlife in national parks
Researchers call for uniform regulations to manage wild animals in European national parks. (2020-02-13)
Increasing number of grocery stores in some areas could reduce food waste up to 9%
Food waste is a big problem in the United States. (2020-02-12)
Herd immunity: Disease transmission from wildlife to livestock
Scientists provide guidelines for minimizing the risk of spreading disease between elk and cattle in Southern Alberta. (2020-02-12)
Dementia may reduce likelihood of a 'good death' for patients with cancer
As the population ages, the number of cancer patients with dementia has increased. (2020-02-05)
Authentic behavior at work leads to greater productivity, study shows
Matching behavior with the way you feel -- in other words, not faking it -- is more productive at work and leads to other benefits, according to a new study co-authored by Chris Rosen, management professor in the Sam M. (2020-02-03)
Success and failure of ecological management is highly variable
What do we really know about reasons attributed to the success or failure of wildlife management efforts? (2020-01-29)
Environmentally friendly shipping helps to reduce freight costs
The shipping sector has potential to gain profit by reducing carbon dioxide emissions. (2020-01-21)
Benefits of integrating cover crop with broiler litter in no-till dryland cotton systems
Although most cotton is grown in floodplain soils in the Mississippi Delta region, a large amount of cotton is also grown under no-till systems on upland soils that are vulnerable to erosion and have reduced organic matter. (2020-01-06)
Crop management study recommends 3-year rotations for potato production systems
Building and maintaining soil health is essential to agricultural sustainability, long-term productivity, and economic viability. (2020-01-03)
Brassica crops best for crop rotation and soil health in potato production systems
Crop rotation is vital to any crop production system. Rotating crops maintains crop productivity and soil health by replenishing organic matter, nutrients, soil structure, and other properties while also improving water management and reducing erosion. (2020-01-03)
Long-dormant disease becomes most dominant foliar disease in New York onion crops
Until recently, Stemphylium leaf blight has been considered a minor foliar disease as it has not done much damage in New York since the early 1990s. (2019-12-30)
Studies show integrated strategies work best for buffelgrass control
Buffelgrass is a drought-tolerant, invasive weed that threatens the biodiversity of native ecosystems in the drylands of the Americas and Australia. (2019-12-11)
Too many Canadians live with multiple chronic conditions, say UBC researchers
A lack of physical activity, a poor diet and too much stress are taking their toll on the health of Canadians, says a new UBC study. (2019-12-10)
Trends in Alzheimer's disease diagnoses across the United States
A recent analysis published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society offers estimates of the changes in incidence of Alzheimer's disease in the United States, confirming previous reports of a declining trend. (2019-12-04)
No kale left behind: A new supple management method to limit perishable waste
Many of us know that sting of disappointment when we realize our fridge contents are seriously past their prime. (2019-11-29)
Smooth operator: When earnings management is a good thing
New research from the Kelley School of Business makes the case that 'smoothing the numbers' can be beneficial -- if you have the right team in place to handle the job. (2019-11-26)
In the war on emerging crop diseases, scientists develop new 'War Room' simulations
This research evaluated the important sellers and villages in the Gulu region of Uganda, analyzing their potential role for spreading disease and distributing improved varieties of seed. (2019-11-21)
Craigslist linked to 15% increase in drug abuse facilities, 6% increase in overdose deaths
New research in the INFORMS journal Management Science looks at the influence online platforms have on the rising illegal drug epidemic. (2019-11-18)
Pesticide management is failing Australian and Great Barrier Reef waterways
Scientists say a failure of Australian management means excessive amounts of harmful chemicals -- many now banned in countries such as the EU, USA and Canada -- are damaging the country's waterways and the Great Barrier Reef. (2019-11-07)
Why have so many new diseases developed in the bagged salads sector?
Ready-to-eat salads, also known as fresh-cut or bagged salads, have steadily gained popularity since their introduction in Europe in the early 1980s. (2019-11-06)
Water mold research leads to greater understanding of corn diseases
Corn is a staple feed and biofuel crop with a value close to $3.7 billion in the Michigan economy alone. (2019-11-06)
Black, Hispanic women report more pain postpartum but receive less opioid medication
Non-Hispanic black and Hispanic women were significantly more likely to report higher pain scores compared to non-Hispanic white women during the postpartum period. (2019-11-06)
What we can learn from Indigenous land management
First Nations peoples' world view and connection to Country provide a rich source of knowledge and innovations for better land and water management policies when Indigenous decision-making is enacted, Australian researchers say. (2019-11-05)
Risk factors of MA in patients treated with therapeutic hyperthermia after cardiac arrest
Researchers showed that 20-50% of patients developed an irregular heartbeat that required defibrillation during the active cooling phase of therapeutic hypothermia following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. (2019-11-05)
Adding weight loss counseling to group visits improves diabetes outcomes
For people with difficult-to-control diabetes, adding intensive weight management counseling to group medical visits provided extra health benefits beyond improved blood-sugar control, according to a study led by researchers at the Duke Diet & Fitness Center and the Department of Veterans Affairs. (2019-11-04)
Study finds companies may be wise to share cybersecurity efforts
Research finds that when one company experiences a cybersecurity breach, other companies in the same field also become less attractive to investors. (2019-10-29)
Land management practices to reduce nitrogen load may be affected by climate changes
Nitrogen from agricultural production is a major cause of pollution in the Mississippi River Basin and contributes to large dead zones in the Gulf of Mexico. (2019-10-18)
Next-generation sequencing used to identify cotton blue disease in the United States
Cotton blue disease, caused by Cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV), was first reported in 1949 in the Central African Republic and then not again until 2005, when it was reported from Brazil. (2019-10-17)
First report of cotton blue disease in the United States
Reported from six counties in coastal Alabama in 2017, cotton blue disease affected approximately 25% of the state's cotton crop and caused a 4% yield loss. (2019-10-17)
Family members' emotional attachment limits family firm growth
New research led by Lancaster University Management School's Centre for Family Business shows family-related considerations often trump a desire to grow and expand in family firms. (2019-10-16)
New survey confirms muscadine grapes are affected by parasitic nematodes
Muscadines are also known for being hearty grapes, with a tough skin that protects them from many fungal diseases. (2019-10-15)
How bats relocate in response to tree loss
Identifying how groups of animals select where to live is important for understanding social dynamics and for management and conservation. (2019-10-09)
Pharmacists provide patient value in team-based care
As part of an innovative model being used at UNT Health Science Center, Dr. (2019-10-08)
Crappy news for the dung beetle and those who depend on them
You mightn't think that the life of a dung beetle, a creature who eats poop every day of its short life, could get any worse, but you'd be wrong. (2019-09-24)
Winning-at-all-costs in the workplace: Short-term gains could spell long-term disaster
Organizations endorsing a win-at-all-costs environment may find this management style good for the bottom-line, but it could come a price. (2019-09-18)
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