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Current Diversity News and Events, Diversity News Articles.
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How gliding animals fine-tuned the rules of evolution
Since its inception in 1867, The American Naturalist has maintained its position as one of the world's premier peer-reviewed publications in ecology, evolution, and behavior research. (2020-02-17)
Researchers uncover the moscow subway microbiome
Recently, a group of ITMO University researchers has looked into the microbiome of the Moscow Subway. (2020-02-13)
Huge bacteria-eating viruses found in DNA from gut of pregnant women and Tibetan hot spring
University of Melbourne and the University of California, Berkeley, scientists have discovered hundreds of unusually large, bacteria-killing viruses with capabilities normally associated with living organisms. (2020-02-13)
Gut feelings: Gut bacteria are linked to our personality
Sociable people have a higher abundance of certain types of gut bacteria and also more diverse bacteria, an Oxford University study has found. (2020-02-12)
New world map of fish genetic diversity
An international research team from ETH Zurich and French universities has studied genetic diversity among fish around the world for the first time. (2020-02-10)
'Rule breaking' plants may be climate change survivors
Plants that break some of the 'rules' of ecology by adapting in unconventional ways may have a higher chance of surviving climate change, according to researchers from the University of Queensland and Trinity College Dublin. (2020-02-09)
East African fish in need of recovery
A study of East African coral reefs has uncovered an unfolding calamity for the region: plummeting fish populations due to overfishing, which in turn could produce widespread food insecurity. (2020-02-06)
Simplifying simple sequence repeats
Simple sequence repeats (or microsatellites) continue to be widely used in a variety of biological disciplines, including forensics, paternity testing, population genetics, genetic mapping, and phylogeography. (2020-01-31)
Immune systems not prepared for climate change
Researchers have for the first time found a connection between the immune systems of different bird species, and the various climatic conditions in which they live. (2020-01-30)
Prescribed burns benefit bees
Freshly burned longleaf pine forests have more than double the total number of bees and bee species than similar forests that have not burned in over 50 years, according to new research from North Carolina State University. (2020-01-29)
Making 'lemonade': Chance observation leads to study of microbial bloom formation
A team from the Microbial Diversity course at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Mass., studied a brackish, shallow lagoon over time and found it releases hydrogen sulfide, particularly upon physical disturbance, causing blooms of anoxygenic sulfur-oxidizing phototrophs. (2020-01-23)
Fungal diversity and its relationship to the future of forests
Stanford researchers predict that climate change will reduce the diversity of symbiotic fungi that help trees grow. (2020-01-22)
Research supports new approach to mine reclamation
Geomorphic reclamation is a relatively novel approach intended to mimic the topography of nearby undisturbed lands, with a wide variety of terrain that is stable and less susceptible to erosion. (2020-01-21)
Caterpillar loss in tropical forest linked to extreme rain, temperature events
Using a 22-year dataset of plant-caterpillar-parasitoid interactions collected within a patch of protected Costa Rican lowland Caribbean forest, scientists report declines in caterpillar and parasitoid diversity and density that are paralleled by losses in an important ecosystem service: biocontrol of herbivores by parasitoids. (2020-01-21)
Climate may play a bigger role than deforestation in rainforest biodiversity
In a study on small mammal biodiversity in the Atlantic Forest, researchers found that climate may affect biodiversity in rainforests even more than deforestation does. (2020-01-17)
Human fetal lungs harbor a microbiome signature
The lungs and placentas of fetuses in the womb -- as young as 11 weeks after conception -- already show a bacterial microbiome signature, which suggests that bacteria may colonize the lungs well before birth. (2020-01-17)
New parasitoid wasp species discovered in the Amazon -- can manipulate host's behavior
A research group from the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku studies the diversity of parasitoid insects around the world. (2020-01-14)
Antibiotics could be promising treatment for form of dementia
Researchers at the University of Kentucky's College of Medicine have found that a class of antibiotics called aminoglycosides could be a promising treatment for frontotemporal dementia. (2020-01-10)
Improved functioning of diverse landscape mosaics
It is well-established that biodiverse ecosystems generally function better than monocultures. (2020-01-09)
Gut microbes may improve stroke recovery
New research shows that short chain fatty acids could help protect brain cells from damage caused by inflammation after a stroke. (2020-01-08)
Texas A&M study reveals domestic horse breed has third-lowest genetic diversity
A new study by Dr. Gus Cothran, professor emeritus at the Texas A&M School of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, has found that the Cleveland Bay horse breed has the third-lowest genetic variation level of domestic horses, ranking above only the notoriously inbred Friesian and Clydesdale breeds. (2019-12-18)
Even resilient common species are not immune to environmental crisis
A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore has found that the effective population size and genetic diversity of Singapore's Cynopterus brachyotis, believed to remain widely unaffected by urbanisation, has shrunk significantly over the last 90 years - revealing that the current biodiversity crisis may be much broader than widely assumed, affecting even species thought to be common and tolerant of fragmentation and habitat loss. (2019-12-17)
Southern white rhinos are threatened by incest and habitat fragmentation
The fragmentation of natural habitats by fences and human settlements is threatening the survival of the white rhinoceros. (2019-12-16)
UK insects struggling to find a home make a bee-line for foreign plants
Non-native plants are providing new homes for Britain's insects -- some of which are rare on native plants, a new study has found. (2019-12-16)
Multi-species grassland mixtures increase yield stability, even under drought conditions
In a two-year experiment in Ireland and Switzerland, researchers found a positive relationship between plant diversity and yield stability in intensely managed grassland, even under experimental drought conditions. (2019-12-10)
Hire more LGBTQ and disabled astronomers or risk falling behind, review finds
In a paper published in the journal Nature Astronomy, Professor Lisa Kewley, director of the ARC Centre of Excellence in All Sky Astrophysics (ASTRO 3D), finds that encouraging astronomers from marginalized communities will increase the chances of significant research discoveries. (2019-12-06)
Astronomy fellowship demonstrates measures to dismantle bias, increase diversity in STEM
Joyce Yen of the University of Washington recently worked with the Heising-Simons Foundation to dismantle bias and promote diversity in a prominent grant that the Foundation awards to postdoctoral researchers in planetary science. (2019-12-06)
Multiple correlations between brain complexity and locomotion pattern in vertebrates
Researchers at the Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, have uncovered multi-level relationships between locomotion - the ways animals move - and brain architecture, using high-definition 3D models of lizard and snake brains. (2019-12-05)
Ecology: Wildfire may benefit forest bats
Bats respond to wildfires in the Sierra Nevada Mountains in varied but often positive ways, a study in Scientific Reports suggests. (2019-12-05)
How flowers adapt to their pollinators
The first flowering plants originated more than 140 million years ago in the early Cretaceous. (2019-12-05)
Study: lack of tolerance, institutional confidence threaten democracies
The stability of democracies worldwide could be vulnerable if certain cultural values continue to decline, according to a new study published in Nature Human Behavior. (2019-12-02)
Paleontologists identify new group of pterosaurs
New research suggests that ancient flying reptiles known as pterosaurs were much more diverse than originally thought, according to a new study by an international group of paleontologists including scientists at the University of Alberta and the Museu Nacional in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (2019-11-29)
Nearly 40% of species are very rare and are vulnerable to climate change
Almost 40 percent of global flora is categorized as 'exceedingly rare,' and these species are most at risk of extinction by human development and as the climate continues to change, according to new University of Arizona-led research. (2019-11-27)
COP25 special collection: Keep climate change impacts under control by making biodiversity a focus
Under a 2°Celsius warming scenario, 80 to 83% of language areas in New Guinea -- home to the greatest biological and linguistic diversity of any tropical island on Earth -- will experience decreases in the diversity of useful plant species by 2070, according to a new study. (2019-11-27)
A century later, plant biodiversity struggles in wake of agricultural abandonment
Decades after farmland was abandoned, plant biodiversity and productivity struggle to recover, according to new University of Minnesota research. (2019-11-18)
Ancient Egyptians gathered birds from the wild for sacrifice and mummification
In ancient Egypt, sacred ibises were collected from their natural habitats to be ritually sacrificed, according to a study released Nov. (2019-11-13)
New research shows the more women on a company's board, the more market value is lost
A company with a gender-diverse board of directors is interpreted as revealing a preference for diversity and a weaker commitment to shareholder value, according to new research in the INFORMS journal Organization Science. (2019-11-12)
Evolutionary diversity is associated with Amazon forest productivity
An international team of researchers have revealed for the first time that Amazon forests with the greatest evolutionary diversity are the most productive. (2019-11-11)
How prenatal diet, delivery mode and infant feeding relate to pediatric allergies
Two new studies being presented at the ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting contain new information on how prenatal diet, the way the baby is delivered, and infant feeding practices can affect the risk of allergy. (2019-11-08)
Genetic diversity facilitates cancer therapy
Cancer patients with more different HLA genes respond better to treatment. (2019-11-08)
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