Current Divorce News and Events

Current Divorce News and Events, Divorce News Articles.
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Use of pronouns may show signs of an impeding breakup
Evidence of an impending breakup may exist in the small words used in everyday conversations months before either partner realizes where their relationship is heading, according to new psychology research. (2021-02-01)

Conflict between divorced parents can lead to mental health problems in children
A study from Arizona State University's REACH Institute has found that when children are exposed to conflict between their divorced or separated parents, they experience fear of abandonment. This worry about being abandoned in response to interparental conflict was associated with future mental health problems in children, especially for children who had strong relationships with their fathers. (2021-01-12)

Examining association of age, household dysfunction, outcomes in early adulthood
Population data from Denmark were used to examine whether age at exposure to negative experiences in childhood and adolescence (parents' unemployment, incarceration, mental disorders, death and divorce, and the child's foster care experiences) was associated with outcomes in early adulthood. (2021-01-07)

Measuring broken hearts: divorce has negative effects on physical and mental health
Divorce can be grueling, and researchers are interested in understanding the factors that affect mental and physical health during this experience. A recent study is the first to examine divorcees immediately after a divorce and finds that their mental and physical health is reduced, with conflict emerging a key factor. The results could help researchers to design interventions to support divorcees through their divorce. (2020-11-30)

What makes a happy couple, a happy family?
Being emotionally flexible may be one of the most important factors when it comes to longevity and overall health of your romantic and familial relationships. That's the finding of a new University of Rochester meta-analysis, published in the Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, which statistically combined the results of 174 separate studies that had looked at acceptance and commitment therapy, mindfulness, and emotion regulation. (2020-11-25)

Difficult to build a family after exposure to chemical weapons
People who have been exposed to chemical warfare agents (CWAs) feel uncertain, decades after the exposure, about their survival and ability to build a family, a University of Gothenburg study shows. Women are more severely affected than men. (2020-10-30)

Researchers take a stand on algorithm design for job centers: Landing a job isn't always the right goal
Algorithms that assess the risk of citizens becoming unemployed are currently being tested in a number of Danish municipalities. But according to a new study from the University of Copenhagen, gaining employment is not the only relevant goal for those out of work -- nor should it be for an algorithm. (2020-10-29)

Shorebirds more likely to divorce after successful breeding
Research led by the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath found that a range of factors affected the fidelity and parenting behaviour of plovers, rather than being defined by the species. (2020-09-28)

People who were children when their parents divorced have less 'love hormone'
People who were children when their parents were divorced showed lower levels of oxytocin -- the so-called ''love hormone'' -- when they were adults than those whose parents remained married, according to a Baylor University study. The lower level may play a role in having trouble forming attachments when they are grown. (2020-09-08)

Study of one million Danish children: Childhood adversity increases the risk of early death
Social adversity in early childhood appears to be a significant risk factor for death in early adulthood. Children who have experienced repeated serious adversity such as losing a parent, mental illness in the family, poverty or being placed in foster care have a 4.5 times higher risk of dying in early adulthood than children who have not experienced adversity during childhood. This is the conclusion of a new large-scale study conducted at the University of Copenhagen. (2020-08-19)

When it comes to happiness, what's love got to do with it?
Researchers from Michigan State University conducted one of the first studies of its kind to quantify the happiness of married, formerly married and single people at the end of their lives to find out just how much love and marriage played into overall well-being. (2020-07-23)

Study shows humans are optimists for most of life
Researchers from Michigan State University led the largest study of its kind to determine how optimistic people are in life and when as well as how major life events affect how optimistic they are about the future. (2020-07-13)

UBC study identifies social and behavioral factors most closely associated with dying
Smoking, divorce and alcohol abuse have the closest connection to death out of 57 social and behavioural factors analyzed in this study. The researchers analyzed data collected from 13,611 adults in the U.S. between 1992 and 2008, and identified which factors applied to those who died between 2008 and 2014. They intentionally excluded biological and medical factors. (2020-06-22)

New study examines impact of major life events on wellbeing
Researchers examined the effect of 18 major life events on wellbeing. (2020-05-28)

Study finds childhood cancer does not affect parental separation, divorce, and family planning in Denmark
The diagnosis of cancer in a child can be devastating to parents and other loved ones, but in a recent study from Denmark, having a child with cancer did not appear to impact parents' risk of separation or divorce or affect future family planning. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society (ACS). (2020-05-25)

Condom nation
Researchers at McMaster University have peered into the most intimate moments of sexually active women and men across Canada to ask if they're using condoms, all in an effort to gather data that could inform decisions around public health and sex education. (2020-02-20)

Love matters: How parents' love shapes children's lives
Parents often put their own relationship on the back burner to concentrate on their children, but a new study shows that when spouses love each other, children stay in school longer and marry later in life. (2020-02-12)

Why egalitarian values don't catch on in post-Soviet countries
People's values of personal choice, such as their attitudes towards abortion, divorce, and premarital sex, are usually determined their level of education, age, religiosity, and social status. At least this is the case in many countries such as the US and those in Europe. In a recent study, sociologists from HSE University and Max Planck Institute found that in post-Soviet countries, personal values are most determined by people's level of patriotism. http://jourssa.ru/?q=en/Lopatina%20et%20al_2019_4_Article (2020-02-11)

Study shows effects of Chinese divorce law on women's wellbeing
In a new study, Yale sociologist Emma Zang examined the consequences of the 2011 judicial interpretation on the well being of men and women. It found that while the judicial interpretation initially diminished women's well being by depriving them of property rights and economic autonomy, the negative effects weakened over the long term. (2020-01-24)

Conversational difficulties with father affect adolescent health
Conversational difficulties with father after a divorce affects the children's health negatively. (2020-01-14)

Husbands' stress increases if wives earn more than 40 per cent of household income
Husbands are least stressed when their wives earn up to 40% of household income but they become increasingly uncomfortable as their spouse's wages rise beyond that point. (2019-11-19)

Prenatal stress could affect baby's brain, say researchers
New research from King's College London has found that maternal stress before and during pregnancy could affect a baby's brain development. (2019-10-08)

For kids who face trauma, good neighbors or teachers can save their longterm health
New research shows just how important positive childhood experiences are for long-term health, especially for those who experience significant adversity as a child. Studies over the past 20 years have found a correlation between adverse childhood events (such as death or divorce) and worse health outcomes later in life. A new study discovers that positive childhood experiences, like having good neighbors, or a teacher you trust, have the potential to negate harmful health effects caused by adverse childhood experiences. (2019-09-16)

Beliefs about uncommitted sex may put marriages at risk
An individual's behaviors and attitudes in relation to uncommitted sexual relationships, even before the marriage, can contribute to marital satisfaction or dissolution. (2019-09-05)

FSU researchers find furry friends ease depression, loneliness after spousal loss
As Healthy Aging Month is underway this September, Florida State University researchers have found the companionship of a pet after the loss of a spouse can help reduce feelings of depression and loneliness in older adults. (2019-09-05)

'Stressors' in middle age linked to cognitive decline in older women
A new analysis of data on more than 900 Baltimore adults by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers has linked stressful life experiences among middle-aged women -- but not men -- to greater memory decline in later life. (2019-08-05)

Social networks and suicide prevention
Depression and mental health problems are increasing - and suicide and drug overdose rates are rising dramatically in the USA. In many US communities, traditional social networks -- face-to-face contacts of daily life -- are unraveling with the loss of social supports, Flinders University psychiatrists warn in a letter published in the international journal The Lancet. This is associated with increasing 'deaths of despair' related to alcohol, opiate overdose and suicide 'becoming more prevalent than ever.' (2019-05-22)

Childhood adversity linked to higher out-of-pocket health care costs in adulthood
A study has found that out-of-pocket health care spending and medical debt are substantially higher when adults have a history of adverse childhood experiences. The study showed that household medical costs were 30 percent higher, and the likelihood of medical debt was doubled, when an adult had lived through three or more adverse experiences during childhood. (2019-03-21)

Teens need to text, talk with parents often to maintain youth resiliency after a divorce
Texting, FaceTime and other popular communication methods among teens may help build supportive parent-youth relationships after a divorce, according to a Kansas State University family studies researcher. (2019-02-20)

Mom's reward: Female Galápagos seabird has a shorter lifespan than males
The male Nazca booby, a large seabird of the Galápagos Islands, often outlives the domineering female of the species, according to new research from Wake Forest University published today in the Journal of Animal Ecology. Why? It's a story of rotating sex partners, the cost of being a parent and how the body falls apart in old age. (2019-02-12)

Time parents spend with children key to academic success
The time parents spend with their children has a powerful effect on their educational achievement, according to a large study with a novel approach. Researchers analyzed data on children in Israel who lost a parent through death or divorce. (2019-02-04)

Why your number of romantic partners mirrors your mother
A new national study shows that people whose mothers had more partners -- married or cohabiting -- often follow the same path. Results suggest that mothers may pass on personality traits and relationship skills that make their children more or less likely to form stable relationships. (2018-11-13)

Updated Estimates of frequency of adverse childhood experiences
A new survey study suggests childhood adversity is common across sociodemographic groups but that some people are at higher risk of having experienced childhood adversity. The study updates the estimated frequency of adverse childhood experiences in the US adult population using a representative sample of people from 23 states. (2018-09-17)

Shared lifetime of grandmothers and grandchildren significantly increased since 1800s
The importance of grandmothers in the lives of their grandchildren has changed. The shared lifetime between grandmothers and their grandchildren has a fundamental effect on how grandparents and grandchildren influence each other. A study conducted by biologists at the University of Turku, based on Finnish parish registers, indicates that, in this agrarian society, the shared lifetime of grandchildren and their grandmothers was short. (2018-09-07)

On-again, off-again relationships might be toxic for mental health
A researcher from the University of Missouri says that the pattern of breaking up and getting back together can impact an individual's mental health and not for the better. He suggests people in these kinds of relationships should make informed decisions about stabilizing or safely terminating their relationships. (2018-08-23)

Study examines relationship between social disparities and benign prostatic hyperplasia
In an Andrologia study of 100,000 men in Korea, social disparities -- such as low education level and low household income, current or previous use of medical aid health insurance, blue-collar employment or unemployment, divorce, and low social capital of communities -- were all linked with a higher prevalence of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a condition that is characterized by an enlarged prostate due to aging, lower urinary tract blockage, and other factors. (2018-08-22)

The glass ceiling: Three reasons why it still exists and is hurting the economy
New research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business finds the glass ceiling -- that invisible barrier to advancement that women face at the top levels of the workplace -- remains as intractable as ever and is a drag on the economy. (2018-08-22)

Is parental belief in importance of religion associated with lower risk of suicidal behavior in kids?
Parents' belief in the importance of religion was associated with a lower risk for suicidal behavior by their children regardless of a child's own belief about the importance of religion and other known risk factors such as parental depression, suicidal behavior and divorce. (2018-08-08)

'Unreasonable behaviour' most common ground for divorce (new research suggests)
A new Oxford University study charts the changes in the main 'facts' that husbands and wives give for petitioning for divorce, since the Divorce Reform Act 1969 was implemented in 1971. It finds that over time, people's use of the law for legally ending their unions has changed considerably, with the fault-based fact of 'unreasonable behaviour' most used in recent years, and desertion the least. (2018-07-30)

Secular countries can expect future economic growth, confirms new study
New research measuring the importance of religion in 109 countries spanning the entire 20th century has reignited an age-old debate around the link between secularisation and economic growth. The study, published in Science Advances, has shown that a decline in religion influences a country's future economic prosperity. (2018-07-18)

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