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Current Divorce News and Events, Divorce News Articles.
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Parents who had severe trauma, stresses in childhood more likely to have kids with behavioral health problems
A new study finds that severe childhood trauma and stresses early in parents' lives are linked to higher rates of behavioral health problems in their own children. (2018-07-09)

Closer monitoring of surgeons needed to stave off burn-out and heavy drinking
Surgeons need closer monitoring to stave off their risk of burn-out, heavy drinking, and other unhealthy behaviours, and it's time for the profession to fix this problem itself before the government steps in, urges a leading surgeon in an editorial published in the Journal of ISAKOS (JISAKOS). (2018-06-25)

Brain matures faster due to childhood stress
Stress in early childhood leads to faster maturation of certain brain regions during adolescence. In contrast, stress experienced later in life leads to slower maturation of the adolescent brain. This is the outcome of a long-term study conducted by researchers of Radboud University in which 37 subjects have been monitored for almost 20 years. The findings will be published in Scientific Reports on June 15. (2018-06-15)

Smoking, lack of exercise linked to early death after divorce
A growing body of research links divorce to a wide range of poor health outcomes, including greater risk for early death. A new University of Arizona study points to two possible culprits: a greater likelihood of smoking after divorce and lower levels of physical activity. (2018-05-29)

Gap in financial literacy widens for couples the longer the relationship lasts, study suggests
As couples mature together, they often grow apart in their level of interest and skill in handling their finances. A disparity in financial literacy that may be small or even nonexistent at first can increase over time depending on how much responsibility one partner undertakes, according to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Colorado-Boulder. (2018-05-01)

Skewed sex ratios causes single fathers to bring up the young
When the balance of the sexes is skewed towards one gender, parents are more likely to split up, leaving the father to care for the offspring, says a study from an international team of scientists studying bird populations. (2018-04-25)

Divorce and low socioeconomic status carry higher risk of second heart attack or stroke
Heart attack survivors who are divorced or have low socioeconomic status have a higher risk of a second attack, according to research from Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a European Society of Cardiology journal. (2018-04-17)

Equal earnings help couples say 'I do' and stay together
Recent work by Patrick Ishizuka, a postdoctoral fellow at Cornell University's Cornell Population Center, is the first to offer empirical evidence that cohabitating couples are likely to get married only when they earn as much as their married peers. (2018-04-12)

Negative fateful life events and the brains of middle-aged men
Conflict, a death in the family, financial hardship and serious medical crises are all associated with accelerated physical aging. In a new study, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine found that such negative fateful life events -- or FLEs -- appear to also specifically accelerate aging in the brain. (2018-04-05)

Gender roles highlight gender bias in judicial decisions
Judges may be just as biased or even more biased than the general public in deciding court cases where traditional gender roles are challenged, according to a new study published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science. (2018-04-03)

Brain SPECT imaging predicts outcomes in depressed patients
New research from the Amen Clinics shows that brain SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging, a study that measures blood flow and activity patterns, identifies who is likely to get better from depression and who is not. The study is published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, because depression is a highly treatable risk for cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. (2018-03-20)

How people cope with difficult life events fuels development of wisdom, study finds
How a person responds to a difficult life event such as a death or divorce helps shape the development of their wisdom over time, a new study from Oregon State University suggests. (2018-02-20)

Marriage may help stave off dementia
Marriage may lower the risk of developing dementia, concludes a synthesis of the available evidence published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. (2017-11-28)

Why rural coal families are less likely to divorce
Rural coal-mining families show resilience against divorce when faced with the economic downturns common in the industry, a new study suggests. Researchers found that rural counties with higher levels of coal jobs had lower divorce rates compared with similar counties with fewer coal jobs during the 1990s, when the coal industry was losing jobs. (2017-11-20)

Has the Mental Health Act had its day?
Patients with a 'mental disorder' in England and Wales can be detained and treated against their will under the Mental Health Act (MHA). The United Nations has said the UK should repeal legislation authorising compulsory treatment in healthcare. (2017-11-15)

Childhood spankings can lead to adult mental health problems
Getting spanked as a child can lead to a host of mental health problems in adulthood, say University of Michigan researchers. (2017-11-02)

Co-parenting after the end of a violent marriage: What does the first year look like?
Intimate partner violence is not uncommon among divorcing couples. Whether a woman experienced intimate partner violence during marriage -- and the kind of violence she experienced -- has an impact on how well she and her former partner are able to co-parent after separation. Researchers at the University of Illinois wanted to find out how co-parenting varies during the first year after separation for mothers who have experienced different types of violence in their marriages. (2017-11-01)

Hispanic children and exposure to adverse experiences
A new study of national survey information gathered on more than 12,000 Hispanic children from immigrant and U.S.-native families found that although they experience more poverty, those from immigrant families reported fewer exposures to such adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) as parental divorce and scenes of violence. (2017-10-11)

Why does divorce run in families? The answer may be genetics
Children of divorced parents are more likely to get divorced when compared to those who grew up in two-parent families -- and genetic factors are the primary explanation, according to a new study by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University and Lund University in Sweden. (2017-10-04)

Parents not confident schools can assist child with chronic disease, mental health
Most parents are sure schools would be able to provide basic first aid but are less confident about a school's ability to respond to more complex health situations, such as an asthma attack or mental health problem. (2017-09-18)

Immigrant parents report fewer adverse childhood experiences than US-born parents
A new study found immigrants reported fewer potentially health-harming adverse childhood experiences, such as abuse, violence, or divorce, than native-born Americans. The findings, which will be highlighted in an abstract presentation during the American Academy of Pediatrics 2017 National Conference & Exhibition, suggest immigrants may experience different forms of stress early in life than do those born in the United States. (2017-09-15)

Shared custody equals less stress for children
Children who live full time with one parent are more likely to feel stressed than children in shared custody situations. The benefit holds regardless of the level of conflict between the parents or between parent and child. These are the results of a new study from Stockholm University's Demography Unit. (2017-08-30)

Married patients with heart disease have better survival rates
Marriage is a vital factor affecting the survival of patients who have had a heart attack, as well as the survival of patients with the most important risk factors, according to research presented today at ESC Congress. (2017-08-28)

Babies of kidnapped brides suffer, too
Bride kidnapping remains a common practice in a handful of countries. And when young women are kidnapped into marriage, their babies pay a price, suggests new research from Duke University. The researchers looked at the Central Asian republic of Kyrgyzstan, where bride kidnapping remains widespread. Infants born to kidnapped brides had birthweights 80 to 190 grams lower than other babies, says the new paper, which appears online in Demography. (2017-08-02)

FSU researcher paves new path toward preventing obesity
People who experience unpredictable childhoods face a higher risk of becoming obese as adults. (2017-07-24)

Individualistic practices and values increasing around the world
Individualism is thought to be on the rise in Western countries, but new research suggests that increasing individualism may actually be a global phenomenon. The findings, published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, show that increasing socioeconomic development is an especially strong predictor of increasing individualistic practices and values in a country over time. (2017-07-18)

At the cellular level, a child's loss of a father is associated with increased stress
The absence of a father -- due to incarceration, death, separation or divorce -- has adverse physical and behavioral consequences for a growing child. But little is known about the biological processes that underlie this link between father loss and child well-being. In a study published July 18 in the journal Pediatrics, a team of researchers, including those from Princeton University, report that the loss of a father has a significant adverse effect on telomeres, the protective nucleoprotein end caps of chromosomes. (2017-07-18)

Fertility treatment does not increase the risk of divorce
Despite repeated claims that the disappointments of infertility and stress of treatment can put intolerable strain on relationships, a large nationwide study involving more than 40,000 women has found that fertility treatment does not increase the risk of divorce. (2017-07-05)

The surprising trend in extramarital sex in America
Older Americans are cheating on their spouses more than their younger counterparts, with 20 percent of married Americans over age 55 reporting they've engaged in extramarital sex. Just 14 percent of those under age 55 say they've cheated. (2017-07-05)

Marriage makes men fatter, shows new research
Being married makes men gain weight, and the early days of fatherhood add to the problem, finds new research from the University of Bath's School of Management. (2017-06-21)

To connect biology with electronics, be rigid, yet flexible
Scientists have measured a thin film made of a polymer as it interacted with ions and electrons. They show how there are rigid and non-rigid regions of the film, and that these regions could accommodate electrons or ions -- but not both equally. (2017-06-19)

Study of sisters helps explain dad's influence on risky sexual behavior
Researchers have shown links between father involvement and daughters' sexual behavior, with the standard explanation attributing that influence to shared genes that impact both a father's behavior and relationships and his child's problem behavior, including engaging in risky sex and affiliating with delinquent peers. But a study led by a University of Utah researcher and published in Developmental Psychology suggests that even though genes likely play a part, they may not be the whole story. (2017-06-08)

Parents' divorce increases risk of health disorders in children
The children's well-being is usually one of the biggest concerns when a couple gets a divorce. Scientists at the universities of Santiago de Compostela and Vigo have carried out a study into how divorce affects the children's health, finding increased risk of genitourinary, gastrointestinal, dermatological and neurological issues. (2017-05-24)

Keeping young women's weight gain to less than 800g/year could help prevent progression from healthy weight to overweight and obesity
New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Porto, Portugal (May 17-20) shows that rates of weight gain are established by the time women are 18-23 years old. Measuring rates of weight gain at this age could identify women who are likely to become overweight or obese by the time they are 40. Furthermore, women who are divorced, separated or widowed, and those who smoke >10/day are most at risk of becoming overweight or obese. (2017-05-18)

Narrative journaling may help heart health post-divorce
Journaling after divorce could improve cardiovascular health -- but only if it is done in an expressive way that tells a story, new University of Arizona research suggests. (2017-05-08)

'Narrative expressive writing' might protect against harmful health effects of divorce-related stress
For people going through a divorce, a technique called narrative expressive writing -- not just writing about their emotions, but creating a meaningful narrative of their experience -- may reduce the harmful cardiovascular effects of stress related to marital separation, reports a study in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. (2017-05-08)

Ordinary sounding expressions of teen angst may signal early depression
While it's estimated at least one in 10 teens in the US suffer from depression at some point, few will use the word 'depressed' to describe negative emotions hanging over them. Instead, new research at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting in San Francisco suggests, they're likely to use terms such as 'stressed,' or 'down,' and other words that may sound like ordinary teen angst but could be a signal of more serious, pre-depressive symptoms. (2017-05-04)

Loss of spouse or partner to suicide linked to physical, mental disorders
People who lose a partner to suicide are at increased risk for a number of mental and physical disorders, including cancer, depression, herniated discs and mood disorders than those in the general population, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. (2017-03-22)

Researchers gain insight into day-to-day lives of parents raising children with autism
A new study by the University of Wisconsin-Madison looks at the daily experiences of the parents of children with autism spectrum disorder to provide a more detailed picture of the strengths and vulnerabilities of couples raising a child with ASD. (2017-03-20)

Research shows infertility tied to relationship disruption in Ghana
New research shows Ghanaian women who have problems conceiving are more likely to experience relationship breakdown. (2017-03-07)

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