Current Drilling News and Events

Current Drilling News and Events, Drilling News Articles.
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Shale gas development in PA increases exposure of some to air pollutants
Air pollution levels may have exceeded air quality standards during the development of some Marcellus Shale natural gas wells in Pennsylvania, potentially impacting more than 36,000 people in one year alone during the drilling boom, according to Penn State scientists. (2021-02-18)

First humans in Tasmania must have seen spectacular auroras
A small sub-alpine lake in western Tasmania has helped establish that 41,000 years ago Australia experienced the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion and that Tasmanian, Aboriginals, would've seen it. (2021-02-15)

Israel can expect a major earthquake of 6.5 on the Richter scale in the coming years
The researchers warn: In the coming years, it is likely that a devastating earthquake will hit, causing hundreds of deaths. (2021-01-06)

Evidence for a massive paleo-tsunami at ancient Tel Dor, Israel
Underwater excavation, borehole drilling, and modelling suggests a massive paleo-tsunami struck near the ancient settlement of Tel Dor between 9,910 to 9,290 years ago, according to a study published December 23, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Gilad Shtienberg, Richard Norris and Thomas Levy from the Scripps Center for Marine Archaeology, San Diego CA, USA, and colleagues from Utah State University and the University of Haifa. (2020-12-23)

Fracking sites may increase heart failure hospitalizations across large regions
Heart failure patients who live in communities affected by fracking are at increased risk for hospitalization, according to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology today. The study looked at the environmental exposure risk of thousands of heart failure patients across Pennsylvania. (2020-12-07)

How hot is too hot for life deep below the ocean floor?
At what depth beneath the seabed does it become so hot that microbial life is no longer possible? This question is the focus of a close scientific cooperative effort between JAMSTEC and MARUM -- Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen. An expedition by the drilling program IODP in 2016 has provided new insights into the temperature limits of life beneath the ocean floor. The findings have now been published by the international team in Science. (2020-12-03)

Researchers discover life in deep ocean sediments at or above water's boiling point
Research published today in the journal Science found single-celled organisms living in sediments 1180 meters beneath the ocean at temperatures of 120 degrees Celsius (2020-12-03)

Scientists have discovered an ancient lake bed deep beneath the Greenland ice
Scientists have detected what they say are the sediments of a huge ancient lake bed sealed more than a mile under the ice of northwest Greenland--the first-ever discovery of such a sub-glacial feature anywhere in the world. (2020-11-10)

Light stimulation makes bones heavier
Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers showed that laser ablation of bone inhibits expression of the osteogenesis inhibitor protein sclerostin without causing inflammation, unlike the conventional bur-drilling technique. Further investigations confirmed that this beneficial bio-stimulation works by inducing mechanical stress. These findings help advance research into the treatment of osteoporosis as well as specific enhancement of bone regrowth in orthopedic and dental surgery. (2020-10-08)

Unraveling 66 million years of climate history from ocean sediments
Researchers have analyzed data from deep-sea sediments in order to reconstruct Earth's climate with an unprecedented temporal resolution. To achieve this, the international team, led by Dr. Thomas Westerhold of MARUM and Dr. Norbert Marwan of PIK, compiled and analyzed a comprehensive dataset obtained from sediment cores from the ocean floor. The team's new climate reference curve is now published in Science. (2020-09-10)

High-fidelity record of Earth's climate history puts current changes in context
For the first time, climate scientists have compiled a continuous, high-fidelity record of variations in Earth's climate extending 66 million years into the past. The record reveals four distinctive climate states, which the researchers dubbed Hothouse, Warmhouse, Coolhouse, and Icehouse. These major climate states persisted for millions and sometimes tens of millions of years, and within each one the climate shows rhythmic variations corresponding to changes in Earth's orbit around the sun (2020-09-10)

66 million years of Earth's climate uncovered from ocean sediments
Changes in the Earth's climate over the last 66 million years have been revealed in unprecedented detail by a team involving UCL researchers, highlighting four distinctive climatic states and the natural million- and thousand-year variability that Earth's climate has experienced. (2020-09-10)

Scientists predicted new hard and superhard ternary compounds
Scientists have predicted new hard and superhard ternary compounds in the tungsten-molybdenum-boron system using computational methods. (2020-09-04)

How the seafloor of the Antarctic Ocean is changing - and the climate is following suit
Experts have reconstructed the depth of the Southern Ocean at key phases in the last 34 million years of the Antarctic's climate history (2020-08-04)

New study confirms extensive gas leaks in the North Sea
At abandoned oil & gas wells in the North Sea, considerable quantities of the potent greenhouse gas methane escape uncontrolled into the water. These leaks account for the dominant part of the total methane budget of the North Sea. This is shown in a new study recently published by researchers from GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany in the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control. It confirms earlier studies based on a greatly extended data basis. (2020-07-30)

Tailored light inspired by nature
An international research team with Prof. Cornelia Denz from the Institute of Applied Physics at the University of M√ľnster (Germany) develop for the first time light fields using caustics that do not change during propagation. With the new method, the physicists cleverly exploit light structures that can be seen in rainbows or when light is transmitted through drinking glasses. (2020-07-29)

New research finds graphene can act as surfactant
New research into graphene flakes has discovered that the material can act as a surfactant, for the first time demonstrating how it can be a versatile 2D stabiliser ideal for many industrial applications from oil extraction to paper processing. (2020-07-22)

What factors influence the likelihood of fracking-related seismicity in Oklahoma?
The depth of a hydraulic fracturing well in Oklahoma, among other factors, increases the probability that fracking will lead to earthquake activity, according to a new report in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. (2020-07-21)

Iron in the Greenland ice core relative to Asian loess records over the past 110,000 years
Xiao and colleagues examined ''iron hypothesis'' evidences in Greenland NEEM ice core. The result showed that the iron (Fe) records were significantly anti-correlated with the carbon oxide (CO2) concentrations during cold periods over the past 110 kyr B.P. The severe anthropogenic contamination has no significant impacts on the bioavailable Fe deposition in the NEEM ice core. (2020-07-03)

Skoltech researchers solve a 60-year-old puzzle about a superhard material
Skoltech researchers together with their industrial colleagues and academic partners have cracked a 1960s puzzle about the crystal structure of a superhard tungsten boride that can be extremely useful in various industrial applications, including drilling technology. (2020-07-03)

Building a harder diamond
Scientists at the University of Tsukuba create a theoretical carbon-based material that would be even harder than diamond. This work may have industrial applications for cutting and polishing in place of current synthetic diamond. (2020-07-01)

Oil forecasting technique adapted for spreadsheets may cut shale operator costs
Porous rock containing oil and natural gas are buried so deep inside the earth that shale operators rely on complex models of the underground environment to estimate fossil fuel recovery. These simulations are notoriously complex, requiring highly-skilled operators to run them. These factors indirectly impact the cost of shale oil production and ultimately, how much consumers pay for their fuel. (2020-06-22)

Simulating borehole ballooning helps ensure safe drilling of deep-water oil, gas
A device which simulates borehole ballooning, a detrimental side effect of deep-water drilling operations, is expected to ensure safe and efficient operations. If not prevented, borehole ballooning can lead to irreversible damage and serious drilling accidents, which can result in reservoir pollution and huge economic loss. In Review of Scientific Instruments, researchers present a device that can simulate this dangerous phenomenon in the hopes of preventing it. (2020-04-28)

Impacts of cover crop planting dates on soil properties after 4 years
Low biomass production limits cover crop effects on soils. (2020-04-02)

Scientists get first look at cause of 'slow motion' earthquakes
An international team of scientists has for the first time identified the conditions deep below the Earth's surface that lead to the triggering of so-called 'slow motion' earthquakes. (2020-03-25)

Eclectic rocks influence earthquake types
New Zealand's largest fault is a jumble of mixed-up rocks of all shapes, sizes, compositions and origins. According to research from a global team of scientists, this motley mixture could help explain why the fault generates slow-motion earthquakes known as 'slow slip events' as well as destructive, tsunami-generating tremors. (2020-03-25)

Paper: Disposal of wastewater from hydraulic fracturing poses dangers to drivers
A new paper co-written by Yilan Xu, a professor of agricultural and consumer economics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, shows that the growing traffic burden in shale energy boomtowns from trucks hauling wastewater to disposal sites resulted in a surge of road fatalities and severe accidents. (2020-03-02)

Shale drilling activity linked to increased sexually transmitted infections in Texas, Yale study
Researchers at the Yale School of Public Health have found that rates of two sexually transmitted infections (STIs), gonorrhea and chlamydia, are 15% and 10% higher, respectively, in Texas counties with high shale drilling activity (''fracking''), compared to counties without any fracking. (2020-02-13)

Geothermal energy: Drilling a 3,000 meters deep well
Destabilising the precarious equilibrium at depth with geothermal wells may reactivate the geological layers causing earthquakes. Researchers (UNIGE/CNR) have studied the seismic activity linked to a geothermal drilling in search of supercritical fluids. They discovered that the drilling did not cause uncontrolled seismic activity. This drilling under such critical conditions suggests that the technology is on the verge of mastering geothermal energy, paving the way for new sources of non-polluting heat and electricity. (2020-02-10)

Scientists show solar system processes control the carbon cycle throughout Earth's history
This new work sheds fresh light on the complicated interplay of factors affecting global climate and the carbon cycle -- and on what transpired millions of years ago to spark two of the most devastating extinction events in Earth's history. (2020-02-10)

Deformation of Zealandia, Earth's Hidden continent, linked to forging of the Ring of Fire
Recent seafloor drilling has revealed that the 'hidden continent' of Zealandia -- a region of continental crust twice the size of India submerged beneath the southwest Pacific Ocean -- experienced dramatic elevation changes between about 50 million and 35 million years ago. (2020-02-06)

Chitosan-graft-Polyacrylamide tested as inhibitor of hydrate formation
Currently, 90% of the hydrocarbon resources of the entire continental shelf of Russia are concentrated in the Arctic, including 70% on the shelf of the Barents and Kara Seas. Scientists understand that the shelf is a promising future, and the necessary technological basis for its future development should already be created. (2020-02-04)

Seismic biomarkers in Japan Trench fault zone reveal history of large earthquakes
Researchers used a novel technique to study the faults in the Japan Trench, the subduction zone where the magnitude 9.1 Tohoku-Oki earthquake struck in 2011. Their findings reveal a long history of large earthquakes in this fault zone, where they found multiple faults with evidence of more than 10 meters of slip during large earthquakes. (2020-01-27)

The Blue Acceleration: Recent colossal rise in human pressure on ocean quantified
Human pressure on the world's ocean accelerated sharply at the start of the 21st century and shows no sign of slowing, according to a comprehensive new analysis on the state of the ocean. Scientists have dubbed the dramatic rise the ''Blue Acceleration''. The researchers from the Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, synthesized 50-years of data from shipping, drilling, deep-sea mining, aquaculture, bioprospecting and much more. The results are published in the journal One Earth, 24 January. (2020-01-24)

Asteroid impact killed dinosaurs while volcanism shaped life in the aftermath
Researchers who analyzed well-preserved ocean drilling and global temperature records have added support to the idea that the primary cause of the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg) mass extinction was an asteroid impact, rather than extreme volcanism. (2020-01-16)

Air pollution from oil and gas production sites visible from space
US and European satellites help scientists measure nitrogen dioxide from drilling, production and flaring. (2020-01-15)

Effects of natural gas assessed in study of shale gas boom in Appalachian basin
A new study estimated the cumulative effects of the shale gas boom in the Appalachian basin in the early 2000s on air quality, climate change, and employment. The study found that effects on air quality and employment followed the boom-and-bust cycle, but effects on climate change will likely persist for generations to come. The study, which also considered how to compensate for these effects, provides insights for long-term decision making in this field. (2019-12-17)

Experts call for more active prevention of tooth decay for children's teeth
Three-year trial comparing three treatment strategies for tooth decay in children's teeth finds no evidence to suggest that conventional fillings are more successful than sealing decay into teeth, or using preventive methods alone. 43% of those participating in the study experienced toothache or dental infection regardless of the treatment received. FiCTION is the largest study of its kind to date; with 1,144 children, their parents, and 72 NHS dental clinics in the UK involved. (2019-11-27)

US public views on climate and energy
Majorities of Americans say the federal government is doing too little for key aspects of the environment. And most believe the US should focus on development of alternative sources of energy over expansion of fossil fuels, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. (2019-11-25)

Rocky Mountain not-so high: Oil, gas wells drive down Colorado home values, reveals WVU research
Heather Stephens, assistant professor of resource economics and management at West Virginia University, found that shale development negatively impacts house prices, particularly for houses with private water and close proximity to the mountains. (2019-11-12)

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